Importance of immunization stressed as school begins

first_imgProvincial Health Officer, Doctor Perry Kendall, is out with his annual reminder for parents, to start the school year with an up-to-date immunization schedule.He says, “By the time a child reaches five or six years old, he or she should have received booster shots that protect against, measles, polio, chicken pox, whooping cough and more,” and he adds, “kids in grades six and nine should receive follow-up vaccinations.”Doctor Kendall believes over the past 50 years, childhood immunization has been one of the primary keys, to saving young lives and preventing illness.- Advertisement -“Being up to date with your child’s immunizations is really critically important. It will protect your child, but also importantly the community, and it will protect children who themselves aren’t able to be vaccinated because of some underlying medical condition.”All that said, parents are reminded to check with the local public health unit or their health care provider to see if any shots are missing in a family immunization schedule.last_img read more

LETTERKENNY RESIDENT GETS THE ‘SCENT’ OF JAIL AFTER AFTERSHAVE THEFT

first_imgA Romanian teenager living in Letterkenny has pleaded guilty to stealing eight bottles of aftershave from a Derry department store.19-year-old Robert Christian Bicler, of Station House, Pearse Road in Letterkenny, appeared before Derry Magistrates Court on Wednesday. He also admitted possession of a tin-foil lined bag which he used to conceal the bottles.Bicler was given a five-month jail sentence, suspended for two years.The court was told Bicler, who recently arrived in Ireland from Italy, took the aftershave, vauled at £285, from Debenhams’ Foyleside store on Tuesday.District Judge Barney McElholm was told Bicler had previously been given a police caution for stealing perfume from the same store in October.Defence solicitor Walter Hegarty said because of some “cultural peculiarities” in areas of Romania, shoplifting was not regarded as a serious criminal offence.He also said Bicler planned to sell the perfume and send the money to his ill mother in Romania.The judge said such behaviour put at risk the jobs of shop employees.LETTERKENNY RESIDENT GETS THE ‘SCENT’ OF JAIL AFTER AFTERSHAVE THEFT was last modified: October 26th, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

FINAL TALLY: O DOMHNAILL AND GALLAGHER TOP GLENTIES POLL

first_imgSeamus O Domhnaill is delighted with result. Pic Donegal Daily.Seamus O Domhnaill topped the poll in Glenties with Maire Therese Gallagher also certain to take a seat tomorrow. Final tallies are as follows:Enda Bonner (FF) 1,103 Brian Carr (Ind) 530John Curran (FG) 476Padraig Doherty (Ind) 494M T Gallagher (SF) 1,527 Hughie McBride (FF) 336Joe McCarron (DDI) 137Michael McClafferty (Ind) 684M C McG Easpaig (Ind) 990Ian Molloy (FF) 870 Seamus O Domhnaill (FF) 1,816John S O Fearraigh (SF) 1,096Seamus Rodgers (Labour) 710Terence Slowey (FG) 861 FINAL TALLY: O DOMHNAILL AND GALLAGHER TOP GLENTIES POLL was last modified: May 24th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Glenties final tally 2014last_img read more

NBA Draft: Warriors acquire Alen Smailagić from New Orleans, select Eric Paschall at No. 41

first_imgOAKLAND – The Warriors just added a player that they considered worth more valuable than $1.3 million and a future second-round pick. The Warriors also added another player by trading an undisclosed amount of future second-round picks to New Orleans.The Warriors selected Villanova senior forward Eric Paschall at No. 41 in the NBA Draft on Thursday shortly after acquiring Alen Smailagić from the New Orleans Pelicans after he was selected at No. 39. The Warriors acquired the No. 41 pick from …last_img

Gallery: future football stars

first_imgCompiled and photographed by Bongani Nkosi The Dreamfields Project, established in 2007 by radio personality John Perlman, joined forces with the Gauteng Department of Sports and Recreation to stage a one-day football competition in Kgolagano Primary School in Daveyton, east of Johannesburg. After receiving full kit, aspiring stars from eight primary schools in the area took to the field of play to show off their skills.• Read the full story Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.  • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image MORE GALLERIESlast_img read more

Can Conditioned Attics Be Too Big?

first_imgPolyurethane foam is expensiveSpray polyurethane foam has some advantages that make it very attractive to some builders and homeowners, but it’s also much more expensive than other options — closed-cell foam more so than open-cell foam. The price premium, and the limited depth available for insulation between rafters, may result in less-than-optimum insulation levels in the house.“If a builder’s idea of a conditioned attic is to move the insulation to the rafters — but to install less — then the homeowner is getting cheated,” Holladay says.He adds that when spray-foam contractors try to convince homeowners to accept thin installations of insulation in an effort to make their product more competitive on price, they are “cutting corners,” while “code enforcement officials are looking the other way or getting bamboozled by fast-talking spray-foam contractors instead of doing their job. As a result, homeowners are left with homes that have below-code levels of insulation. That’s wrong.”The problem may be more pronounced with open-cell foam because it has a lower R-value per inch than closed-cell foam, as Fincher himself points out. “If Martin is correct, then perhaps I’ve been bamboozled by the insulation contractor who installed 5 1/2 in. of closed-cell on the underside of the rafters,” he writes. “I questioned him because it was only around R-19 and he confidently explained to me that it would work.“…It’s really hard to cipher through what is factual and what is not,” he adds. “Without a whole lot of actual empirical testing and data, you almost have to try something and see if it works. That’s a scary proposition for me.”John Brooks adds numbers to the mix, taken from a recent price quote in Dallas: R-30 open-cell foam at the roof deck for $2.80 per sq. ft. vs. R-30 cellulose at the attic floor for 50 cents a sq. ft.In Fincher’s 4,000-sq. ft. house, cellulose would cost $2,000 while foam would cost $14,000. He calls this a “$12,000 incentive” to air-seal the attic floor and find a way of putting the HVAC system within the conditioned space. True, reducing the square footage of new houses is one way of reducing energy use while consuming fewer natural resources, both fundamental green-building objectives.“Build a smaller, better, well detailed house that has more amenities and lower operating costs for those that live there,” suggests Corian Johnston. “…A well done small house can still be worth as much as a larger one, so you could have the same profit margin with a much better product. Sort of a quality-over-quantity approach.”But, as Fincher points out, homebuyers often want big houses, not little ones, leaving builders stuck between the realities of the marketplace and their own goals.“I didn’t create the market for bigger homes,” Fincher writes. “The market exists in spite of myself and other builders. If and as the market changes to smaller homes (which it is, but maybe not small enough for some of you) builders will adapt as well because we’re not doing this for kicks and grins, we’re doing this with the hopes of making a profit.“I made a decision to build a better home that uses far fewer resources over its life cycle than the same home built to code. I call that being ‘green.’ That decision has added a whole new level of complexity to my building process which increased both my hard and soft costs which I probably won’t ever completely recover in my market.”“I’m OK with that because I’m still making enough money to keep me engaged in this business and I feel better about the improved product that I offer,” he adds. First, reconsider the size of the houseAlthough the size of the houses that Fincher builds is not directly related to his question, some green building advocates may still wince. Brett Moyer is one of them.“Since this a green building forum, I think I should say a couple of things,” Moyer writes. “You certainly have the right to build these ridiculously large monstrosities. You certainly have the right to install spray foams and foam sheathings, and place HVAC and ductwork in the attic.I just hope you aren’t promoting these excessive dwellings as ‘green’ homes, because they are CERTAINLY not green.” RELATED ARTICLES James Fincher is a builder in Oklahoma who’s leaning toward designs with conditioned attics insulated with spray polyurethane foam.However, he’s not convinced that a conditioned attic is the best approach in a large home — something, say, in the 4,000 sq. ft. to 5,000 sq. ft. range.The problem, as he puts it in his Q&A post, is the “sheer volume” of attics in a house this large, and whether the increase in volume will force him to use a bigger HVAC system.The exchange that follows delves into the merits of conditioned attics — that is, those that are heated and cooled just like the rest of the house — versus unheated attics separated from the rest of the house by a layer of insulation on the attic floor.That’s the subject of this week’s Q&A Spotlight. Our expert’s opinionHere’s what GBA technical director Peter Yost had to say:No doubt, any conditioned attic (no matter the pitch or ceiling square area) is better performing, in terms of energy performance and indoor air quality, than exposed HVAC equipment and ducts above the ceiling insulation and air barrier.And in addition to Martin’s suggestion of constructing a small attic mechanical room, there is Building America research supporting some performance advantages of “buried” attic HVAC distribution systems. Also, see this article .But I have to agree with Martin when he states near the end of his related blog on conditioned attics, that “creating a conditioned attic is a solution to a fundamental design flaw.”A high performance home starts with high performance design — if you can’t find design solutions to keep all HVAC ducts and equipment in conditioned space, you missed the earliest and most effective solution. Here is how Steve Baczek, the resident GBA architect puts it:“Creating a mechanical room that is effectively air sealed within a vented attic is a straight-up challenge. I don’t believe the approach has much merit either. I have been asked to do it a number of times and reluctantly have, knowing the likely outcome. When tested for performance, they just don’t work as planned. It’s one of those concepts that seems easy, gets people on board at the design/planning stage, only to fail at the post-construction/ leak-chasing phase. In lieu of this approach, I would put the air handler in the conditioned space and run sealed ductwork in the attic, buried under R-50+ of cellulose. Not the best solution, but not a bad second choice, and one that is pretty easy on the pocketbook. You could also spray the ductwork with CCSF and cover with cellulose at a cheaper cost than spraying the attic.”So onto what I would do. You need an architect who understands HVAC design and performance. I understand this is a challenge. I have had too-many-to-mention (or want to remember) conversations with architects who preach out about high performance house design, and just don’t get it.In a 4,000-square-foot house, depending on the design and site, you are probably talking about one large mechanical room (40 sq. ft.) or two smaller mechanical rooms (20 sq. ft. each – 40 sq. ft. total). Either way, the space accounts for 1% of the conditioned space. This house probably has closets bigger than that.I remember working with a builder to re-engineer his houses and the architect who designed them. The architect argued vehemently with me about how there was just no room in the plan for mechanicals. I simply asked, have you ever designed a house this size without a powder room? Or a laundry room? Her replied, “never.” I simply said you need to place the same priority on the mechanical room as you do the powder room and the laundry room. With that in mind, I would suggest one or two mechanical rooms in the conditioned space, using dropped soffits and ceiling locations to distribute the HVAC system. If a client wants a 4,000-square-foot house, chances are the house will come with 9- or 10-ft. ceilings. A good architect, using this ceiling height to his or her advantage, can create not only a high performance home, but also an aesthetically pleasing one. It’s simply a win/win! Vented or Unvented Attic?Creating a Conditioned Attic Getting Insulation Out of Your Walls and CeilingsAttic Design Upgrades Weighing two energy penaltiesWhen HVAC equipment is installed in an unconditioned attic, the system has to work harder in both the heating and cooling seasons. Soaring attic temperatures in summer greatly lower air conditioning efficiencies; in winter, the problem is reversed but no less problematic.GBA senior editor Martin Holladay calls that “Energy Penalty #1.” He adds that insulating between rafters to create a conditioned attic creates a different energy penalty — “Energy Penalty #2” — namely, the additional energy required to heat and cool the attic now that the volume of the home’s conditioned space has been increased.“Here’s what you need to remember: Energy Penalty #1 is always much bigger than Energy Penalty #2,” Holladay writes, “so there is always a net gain (lower operating costs) when you create a conditioned attic (assuming, of course, that we’re talking about houses with ductwork in the attic).”That said, he adds, there are alternatives. One would be to bring heating and cooling ducts inside the thermal envelope with the use of soffits that hide them. Another would be to build a small mechanical room in part of the attic that could be heated and cooled, rather than making the entire attic a conditioned space.A related factor, notes Corian Johnston, is the increased surface area of an insulated roof compared to an insulated flat ceiling. “A 9/12 roof will have 25% greater surface area than the flat ceiling,” Johnston writes, “so that even with the same R-value and performance of insulation, there is a theoretical 25% greater heat loss or gain. This doesn’t include gable end walls that will add additional area.“Second, heat rises, and unless the ceiling is a barrier, which is not likely although possible, heat will rise into the attic instead of being in the living area conditioned space,” he says. “This may be desirable for cooling but not for heating.”last_img read more

Interview: Director of Photography Jake Swantko of Netflix’s Icarus

first_imgNot every documentary turns out the way you intend. Find out how this filmmaker pivoted to tell a remarkable story.All images via Netflix.We had the opportunity to sit down with the DP Jake Swantko of Netflix’s latest documentary, Icarus. This riveting documentary begins by attempting to reveal the truth about steroid use in sports. However, after consulting with a Russian scientist, the story takes a drastic turn from a Supersize Me-like experiment into a story of espionage while shining a light on one of the biggest scandals in sports history.PremiumBeat: Will you tell us a little bit about your background and how it led to your work on Icarus?Jake Swantko: Yes, well I come from a journalism background. I graduated from the University of Oregon with a degree in communications and then that program went on to basically become cinematography towards the end of my tenure in school. I started shooting documentaries right towards my senior year and then picked up a gig with National Geographic. It’s been a long road. I started off in Oregon and then lived in L.A. for about a year, then I moved to New York, and then briefly after I moved to New York I did some work during the Ukraine Revolution. After that I got a call from Bryan, probably two or three months after I did that work, and he basically told me about this idea for a project that he wanted to start shooting in a month in Boulder, Colorado. So he connected me to a producer who I worked with for quiet a while. I then basically met this guy in Colorado. It started off with this guy with all his belongings in an SUV.For me the camera’s always been able to speak the way I see. To be able to find so much of your voice with the camera, it’s been just a revelation throughout my career. It’s been great to become more of a cinematographer and learn and be able to capture the things as you want to imagine them. I think that’s always been the ethos of my work is to try and capture what I see. It was perfect for Brian and I to meet like that. He needed a journalist, or he needed somebody kind of with that background, and so yeah — I kind of just took off from there.PB: Will you tell us a little bit about the camera package you used on the film?JS: Yes, we used a Canon Vixia for sort of that Supersize Me candidness that you see a lot of in the film. We shot with a Canon C300 and a 24-70, 16-35, and a 70-200. The camera was just the perfect package for us. I shoot with that camera on a Glidecam HD2000 on the back of the motorcycle. The camera ended up being able to balance on the Glidecam. Also, the dynamic range and also the versatility to shoot both action sports but also be able to go incognito enough to go into these Moscow labs and shoot with Gregory. It was the camera to use. Then when the dual pixel autofocus came out, it made it much better to control.PB: The plot of the film almost completely changes; it does a complete 180. As a cinematographer did you have to adjust your shooting style and approach with that change in story or direction?JS: It’s funny, so I come from a journalism background. I had to switch my brain to shoot action sports, and then once it became this political sort of thing, I realized this is more conversation-based and less action. It was definitely at the beginning trying to figure out how to shoot action sports first and take chances with it. Once it became like this is, it was more like nothing strange.PB: As filmmakers was the plot change a gradual process and you happened to find yourself in this new story, or was it immediate and you had to make that quick decision to switch?JS: Well, it was gradual. It’s just weird how it all came about. The second trip of the races, we ended it in Geneva, and then we would leave from Geneva to Moscow to go talk with Gregory. There was kind of a gradual transition in the middle of it. Then when you go from over the course of three years, I guess anything is gradual. I mean when you start to look at it full circle, we started off with a Canon Vixia camera shooting this guy getting out of his car with all his belongings in Colorado. Then you’re filming a Russian chemist getting fingerprinted to enter into witness protection.PB: Did you have that feeling that you struck gold with where the story went?JS: Gregory certainly at one point said “Ryan you’re a very lucky  man.” With Gregory, he’s always saying very explicit and controversial things, but he’s just Gregory, you know. So it seemed like fun and games, and then, yeah — all of a  sudden it was this thing, and we were releasing documents to the New York Times, and the story was on the front page. Then it’s like Wow!PB: So I absolutely loved the lighting in your interviews. Can you tell me a little bit about your lighting approach for those?JS: I love to use pretty simple things to assist natural light as much as possible. I think the C300 is a great camera; its color rendition in daylight is so perfect. Basically what I would do is rig together an 85-watt fluorescent bulb in a china ball and push through silk. Then other than that, we had KinoFlos when we had bigger setups.PB: Will you tell us a little more about your GlideCam setup?JS: When I was approaching shooting and style, I was like I need to take more risk. I was up against the footage from the Tour de France where they have ENG cameras on motorcycles built out. I was going to have none of these and go like 100 miles an hour downhill. Plus, I had to shoot like 14- to 16-hour days. So I was like I’m trying using the C300 on the GlideCam, and it balanced.PB: What’s the main thing you want people to take away from your work on this film? JS: When you are a cinematographer like me, if you are coming from a journalism background, you kind of feel sort of the same things that I feel. Gregory is by far the most intelligent, charismatic, interesting character I’ve ever met. I really hope that people see him for that. There’s a lot of stigma around what he did and the measures he took to beat the system. I would just say (and to echo the film a little bit) he’s risking his life to do something extremely unpopular that no one wants to hear about. The goal of this film is to give him a voice and give whistleblowers like him a voice. There’s no incentive to do what he’s doing, no incentive whatsoever.last_img read more

Dortmund Beats Benfica 4-0 for Champions League Quarterfinal

first_imgDORTMUND, Germany (AP) — Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang scored a hat trick and Christian Pulisic claimed his first Champions League goal as Borussia Dortmund overcame Benfica 4-0 to reach the quarterfinals on Wednesday.Aubameyang had missed a penalty as Dortmund lost 1-0 in the first leg of the Round of 16 contest, but he made up for that by taking his tally to seven goals in seven games as the German side progressed 4-1 on aggregate.Barcelona shocked Paris Saint-Germain 6-1 in Wednesday’s other game with the winner in injury time to progress 6-5 on aggregate.Aubameyang got Dortmund off to a flying start in the fourth minute, heading in from point blank range after Pulisic headed on a corner.Click image to see the highlightsPulisic was playing in place of the injured Marco Reus, with the 18-year-old American making his eighth Champions League appearance.Dortmund kept the visitors pegged back, with Marc Bartra going close and then Ousmane Dembele trying his luck from distance.It was midway through the half before Benfica finally got forward, though Roman Buerki easily saved Franco Cervi’s low shot — a good chance for the visitors.Fear of conceding an away goal seemed to weigh on the Dortmund defense.Cervi should have scored after the break after Lukasz Piszczek botched a clearance but the Dortmund defender scrambled back in time to block.Piszczek more than made up for his error by finding the impressive Pulisic to score at the other end in the 59th with a brilliant chip over the outrushing Ederson.Within two minutes Dortmund had another as Aubameyang grabbed his second from Marcel Schmelzer’s volleyed cross after Julian Weigl picked him out with a fine diagonal ball.Bartra hit the post with a header before Aubameyang completed his hat trick with five minutes remaining thanks to Erik Durm’s cross.Benfica’s Luisao and Victor Lindelof jumps for the ball next to Dortmund’s Lukasz Piszczek during the Champions League round of 16, first leg, soccer match between Benfica and Borussia Dortmund at the Luz stadium in Lisbon, Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Armando Franca) TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

‘Liverpool should blame forwards, not defenders’

first_imgLiverpool Salah, Coutinho and Co to blame for Liverpool struggles, not defenders – Ince Chris Burton Last updated 2 years ago 22:13 28/9/2017 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Mohamed Salah Liverpool Getty Images Liverpool Premier League Jürgen Klopp The former Reds midfielder believes a much-criticised defensive unit would not be under so much pressure if the forwards were doing their job Liverpool should be blaming their inconsistencies on their forwards, not their defenders, according to Paul Ince.The Reds have once again found clean sheets hard to come by this season, with their frailties at the back being exposed on a regular basis.Liverpool 8/15 to keep Newcastle clean sheet Article continues below Editors’ Picks Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. Jurgen Klopp has faced criticism for failing to address those issues during the summer transfer window, although the German has maintained that the right players were not available.Ince feels too much is being made of the defensive leaks, with those misfiring at the opposite end of the field just as culpable for the struggles to generate momentum on Merseyside.The former Reds midfielder wrote in a column for Paddy Power: “I really sympathise with Jurgen Klopp, because he’s brought a philosophy into Liverpool that sees his team create chance after chance consistently.“They’re brilliant going forward and, the thing is, if his forwards don’t take those chances they put pressure on the back five or six.“If they’d have taken a few more of those chances this season – including against Spartak in the Champions League where they drew 1-1 – the game would’ve finished three or 4-0. And if they’d been better in front of goal, no one would be moaning about their defence.“There’s got to be more onus on those forward players for not getting the ball in the net and being more clinical.”Paul Ince Liverpool forwards blameInce added: “[The forwards] are getting away with it and avoiding the criticism, even though it’s those players at fault for missing golden chances.“But while everyone bangs on about the defence, the heat is taken off them, and I feel for Klopp, because he can’t put the ball in the back of the net for them.“Every time Liverpool concede a goal at the minute everyone goes on about their defence and I think it’s a bit unfair. Klopp will get that right, just like he has the forward line.“But there could also be an issue with protection from the wingers and some of the midfield players too, defending should start right from the front.“If you allow balls to go into the box willy-nilly, with wingers not doing their jobs then, yes, it’s going to end in goals. And if you haven’t been finishing chances at the other end, then obviously, it’s going to result in losses.”Liverpool have collected just one win from six fixtures since the last international break and remain stuck on two clean sheets for the season.There is another rest period on the domestic front approaching, with the Reds getting one final opportunity to put things right before that break when they travel to Newcastle on Sunday to face former boss Rafa Benitez. Subscribe to Goal’s Liverpool Correspondent Neil Jones’ weekly email bringing you the best Liverpool FC writing from around the weblast_img read more

Worlds 1st Ocean Cleanup System Launched

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: The Ocean Cleanup The Dutch non-profit organization, The Ocean Cleanup, launched the world’s first ocean cleanup system from the San Francisco Bay on September 8.The cleanup system, named System 001, is heading to a location 240 nautical miles offshore for a two-week trial before continuing its journey toward the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, 1,200 nautical miles offshore, to start the cleanup.System 001 is being towed from the San Francisco Bay by the vessel Maersk Launcher, provided to the project by Danish Maersk Group and DeepGreen, its current charter holder.The system consists of a 600-meter-long U-shaped floating barrier with a three-meter skirt attached below. The system is designed to be propelled by wind and waves, allowing it to passively catch and concentrate plastic debris in front of it. Due to its shape, the debris will be funnelled to the center of the system. Moving slightly faster than the plastic, the system will act like a giant Pac-Man, skimming the surface of the ocean.The Ocean Cleanup’s first cleanup system, System 001, is now on route into the Pacific Ocean. Follow our progress over the next months as we head to the middle of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. pic.twitter.com/jvWg1PDHDw— The Ocean Cleanup (@TheOceanCleanup) September 8, 2018 The system will be deployed in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, the world’s largest accumulation zone of ocean plastics. Situated halfway between Hawaii and California, the patch contains 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic, and covers an area twice the size of Texas.The Ocean Cleanup said that it the first plastic could be collected and returned to land within 6 months after deployment. This will mark the first time that free floating plastic will have been successfully collected at sea. After returning the plastic to land, The Ocean Cleanup plans to recycle the material into products and use the proceeds to help fund the cleanup operations.Once successful, and if the funding is available, The Ocean Cleanup aims to scale up to a fleet of approximately 60 systems focused on the Great Pacific Garbage Patch over the next two years. The Ocean Cleanup projects that the full fleet can remove half of the plastic in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch within five years’ time. This is in line with The Ocean Cleanup’s ultimate goal: reducing the amount of plastic in the world’s oceans by at least 90% by 2040.last_img read more