Riverdale Producers Tease Upcoming Musical Episode

first_img“Riverdale” is about to get a little more musical.The hit series is set to air a big musical episode April 18, and at PaleyFest on Sunday the cast and crew gave fans a preview.Series showrunner Roberto Aguirre-Sacada revealed that the team has wanted to do a musical episode from the very beginning. Twitter Advertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment center_img Advertisement Facebook Advertisementlast_img

THE RAY OF SUNSHINE

first_imgAdvertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Advertisement Toronto’s Mirian Njoh is a designer, model and digital content impresario who was ostracized because of her albinism. Now, with her blog, Ugly Duckling Diaries, she’s a muse to others who feels like the odd one out.Where I’m at style-wiseI always joke that, for me, getting dressed is the hardest part of the day. I think so deeply about fashion because I love it so much. I’d say my style is experimental, versatile, and a little bit street. Any time I’m lounging with friends or taking it easy, that’s an athleisure day. I’ll put on Nikes or cool sweats or something. If I have a meeting, I’ll be more put together—maybe some Ankara prints that are bright and colourful.DIY is in my DNAIt was a normal thing for me to see people making their own clothes: my grandma used to sew church clothes, formal and casual wear for my sisters and me, or make a quilt using scraps from old fabrics. My mom would make curtains. I ran with that DIY stuff, too. I wasn’t rich, so it was “if you can’t buy it, you have to make it.” I got a sewing machine when I was 13. That opened up a lot of my curiosity. I would go online to sewing blogs or read forums with people who reconstructed their old T-shirts into new clothes.center_img Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

CAS Morocco to Play 2017 and 2019 African Cup of Nations

Rabat – The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) has lifted on Thursday Morocco’s ban from participating in the 2017 and 2019 African Cup of Nations, which was imposed by the Confederation of African Football (CAF).CAS said that the “sanctions imposed by CAF on the FRMF have been set aside, with the exception of the fine, which is however reduced to $50,000.”The Confederation of African Football’s Executive Committee decided to ban Morocco from the next two African Nations Cup tournaments after asking to postpone the 2015 Afcon due to fears of the Ebola virus. Morocco was fined to pay a $1 million and was also ordered to pay 8 million euros in damages to CAF and its partners.

GOP activist sues Rhode Island over launch of sports betting

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — A Republican activist is suing over sports betting in Rhode Island, saying the state should have sought voter approval before legalizing and launching it.Daniel Harrop said Thursday sports betting should stop pending a statewide referendum. Former Rhode Island Republican Party Chairman Brandon Bell and attorney Joe Larisa filed a lawsuit against state lottery officials Wednesday on behalf of Harrop, a member of the party’s central committee.Democratic Senate President Dominick Ruggerio has said legal advice says voters approved sports betting when they approved casino gambling. He’s confident Rhode Island would prevail in any challenge.Harrop says he’s not opposed to gambling, but believes the state must follow its constitution and ask voters whether gambling should expand.Rhode Island is the only New England state currently offering sports betting.The Associated Press read more

Kenyan farmers receive UN help to withstand drought prevent food crisis

13 October 2011The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is helping farmers in eastern Kenya make the necessary investments today to withstand drought and prevent food security crises tomorrow. The agency is assisting over 5,000 farming households terrace their fields to conserve rain water for crop use and prevent the soils from being washed away, as well as building simple dams for better harvesting of rain water, states a news release.In return for their labour, the farmers receive vouchers they can redeem for food and building materials for the community-owned dams.Dan Rugabira, FAO’s Representative in Kenya, said such efforts can help farmers “hold the line” and get back on their feet quickly amid bad weather. This particular area of Kenya is subject to intense bursts of rainfall, which can strip away fertile topsoil. Rainwater is lost through run-off, leaving seasonal river beds bone dry the rest of the year.“By building up farmers’ resilience to bad weather today, we help avoid crises tomorrow,” said Mr. Rugabira.FAO also noted that seed stocks in the region are almost depleted and high food and fuel prices have placed an additional strain, forcing families to eat fewer meals a day or to sell off livestock.However, the food situation in these parts of eastern Kenya, though difficult, is not as dire as in other areas of the country or in Somalia, which is facing a humanitarian crisis that is also affecting other parts of the Horn of Africa.“That is precisely why these types of projects are so crucial right now,” said Mr. Rugabira.“We provide families with vouchers they can exchange for basic household items or food while at the same time building vital infrastructure to improve their resilience, so they are not completely blindsided each time the rains fail.”Most people in this arid and semi-arid area of Kenya survive by farming small plots of land and raising livestock such as a few head of cattle or some goats or sheep.They depend on the rains to grow cereal crops such as sorghum, millet and maize, as well as grain legumes such as cowpeas, green grams, beans and pigeon peas. However, consecutive years of patchy rainfall mean that farmers here have not had a decent harvest in two – even three – seasons. read more

Treaty First Nation in BC votes to implement livingwage policy for workers

Treaty First Nation in B.C. votes to implement living-wage policy for workers by The Canadian Press Posted Oct 28, 2014 6:15 pm MDT PORT ALBERNI, B.C. – A Vancouver Island First Nation is implementing a living-wage policy, boosting the pay of some of its workers by almost $7 an hour.Port Alberni’s Huu-ay-aht (who-way-at) First Nation says members of the executive council voted to implement policy on Friday.Unlike a minimum wage, a living wage takes into account families’ needs to cover their basic expenses.The minimum wage in B.C. is $10.25 per hour, but the Huu-ay-aht say they have calculated the living wage for Port Alberni at $17.22 per hour or $33,579 annually.The Huu-ay-aht say it will become the first band in Canada to adopt such a policy and is following in the footsteps of the City of New Westminster which implemented a similar policy in May 2010.The band is one of five Maa-nulth First Nations, which implemented a modern-day treaty with the federal and provincial governments in 2011.“The treaty has given us the ability to make decisions based on our values and goals, and implement those decisions in accordance with our own laws,” says Coun. Tom Mexsis Happynook.“The living-wage policy shows how the treaty gives us the ability to chart our own future.” AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

New stamps for International Day of UN Peacekeepers unveiled

“On this day, we continue to honour the memory of those who gave their lives to the cause of peace, and pay tribute to all men and women who carry on their legacy by serving in the field,” the association said. “UNPA is proud to issue stamps that feature images of the important work of UN peacekeepers around the world.” The stamps will be issued jointly with the Austrian Post on Sunday, and a pre-launch ceremony will be held tomorrow at the World Stamp Show in New York, UNPA said. The UNPA said the stamps can be purchased at unstamps.org, as well as at UNPA stamp shops in New York, Geneva and Vienna. The International Day of UN Peacekeepers was established by the General Assembly in 2002 in tribute to all the men and women serving in peace operations for their high level of professionalism, dedication and courage, as well as to honour the memory of those who have lost their lives in the cause of peace. The Assembly designated 29 May as the Day because it was the date in 1948 when the UN Truce Supervision Organization (UNTSO), the world body’s first peacekeeping mission, began operations in Palestine. The 2016 observance of the Day marks the eighth successive year in which the Organization has honoured more than 100 “Blue Helmets” who lost their lives in the previous year while serving the cause of peace. While the official Day is on 29 May, UN Headquarters in New York this year celebrated on 19 May, under the theme Honouring Our Heroes. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon presided over a wreath-laying ceremony in honour of the nearly 3,500 peacekeepers who have lost their lives while serving under the UN flag. He also presided over a ceremony during which the Dag Hammarskjöld Medal was awarded posthumously to the 129 military, police and civilian personnel who lost their lives while serving in peacekeeping operations during 2015. In addition, Mr. Ban led an inaugural ceremony to award the “Captain Mbaye Diagne Medal for Exceptional Courage. The first such medal was presented to the family of the late Captain Diagne, who saved hundreds of lives in 1994 while serving as a peacekeeper in Rwanda before succumbing to fatal injury incurred while on duty. In his message to mark the Day, the Secretary-General stressed that the confidence the world places in UN peacekeeping is reflected in its “massive growth” in recent years, in terms of both numbers and complexity. He noted that 15 years ago, the Organization had fewer than 40,000 military and police personnel. Today, more than 105,000 uniformed personnel from 124 troop- and police-contributing countries serve under the blue flag, alongside 18,000 international and civilian staff and UN volunteers. “They manifest the best attributes of global solidarity, courageously serving in dangerous environments to provide security to some of the world’s most vulnerable,” the Secretary-General said. UN offices, alongside Member States and non-governmental organizations, hold solemn events throughout 29 May to honour fallen peacekeepers. UN peacekeeping operations mark the Day each year by strengthening bonds with the local populations on whose behalf they serve. They hold sporting events, visits to schools and orphanages, art and essay competitions, photo exhibits, neighbourhood clean-ups, tree plantings, concerts, and conferences and workshops on peace issues. The events held around the world can be tracked under the hashtag #Together4Peace. read more

Louisville names Norton as Cardinals health care provider

Louisville student-athletes will also have online and mobile access to a nurse practitioner for non-urgent ailments. Athletic director Vince Tyra called it a “great day” in a release announcing the partnership.(Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) Louisville Cardinals athletics logo LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) – Louisville has named Norton Healthcare as the Cardinals’ official health care provider.The partnership announced Thursday will provide medical support for all 23 sports programs, including physicals and network access to physicians, orthopedic surgeons and neurologists. Norton Sports Health will also help fund athletic trainers on the sidelines, campus training rooms and imaging equipment. The region’s largest health care provider will also offer mental health services with access to counseling and performance specialists.- Advertisement – read more

VIDEO Goal or no goal

← Previous Story TOP 30 TRANSFERS SUMMER 2014: Duvnjak and Omeyer lead the “golden list” Next Story → DOMINATION: FC Barcelona win IHF Super Globe 2014! SG Flensburg have suffered surprising defeat against Al Sadd at the IHF Super Globe semi-final in Doha, Qatar. Players of Ljubomir Vranjes had a chance to score for extra-time in the last attack, but the goal of Anders Eggert was disallowed. Find out why…

LaCie launches Philippe Starckdesigned Blade Runner 4TB hard drive

first_imgFor me, the look of an external hard drive isn’t of any great importance, but sometimes a new design appears that can’t fail to turn your head. LaCie’s new Blade Runner drive is one of those designs, and it’s all due to world famous designer Philippe Starck’s involvement.Starck has designed everything from interiors to toothbrushes, motorcycles, and street lights. But LaCie convinced him to use his talents on a hard drive housing (again), and the end result is the Blade Runner you see above and below.The Blade Runner is meant to represent an “angular cage-like shell” that poses the question of whether or not we can cage technology. The aluminum cage and blades are meant to act as a very effective cooling aid to help dissipate heat from the drive quickly while at the same time looking great on your desk.Inside you’ll find a 4TB hard drive accessible by a USB 3.0 connection. There’s also a single LED power button that glows orange to show drive activity. At $299, the custom-built Blade Runner isn’t cheap, but then it is aimed at the “design conscious consumer.” And as well as the 4TB local storage you also get access to 10GB additional cloud storage using Wuala.It may actually be hard to secure a Blade Runner as LaCie is only producing 9,999 of them, and the product page already says it’s out of stock. It also isn’t the first time Starck has used his design skills for LaCie. You may remember the Toaster hard drives released in 2009, which similarly turned heads.More at LaCielast_img read more

Fair City is having an allfemale episode and theyre all heading to

first_img 46 Comments Source: RTÉ Fair City/Twitter Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Share59 Tweet Email3 Short URL TONIGHT’S EPISODE OF Fair City is to feature an all-female cast to mark International Women’s Day.In a first for the RTÉ soap, no men will feature in an episode with about a dozen female cast members sharing the screen time.The premise sees the women locked in McCoy’s pub with RTÉ saying that “the cocktails flow” as the night progresses.“We have been planning this for a long time,” executive producer Brigie deCourcy told Morning Ireland. http://jrnl.ie/3276249 Source: RTÉ – IRELAND’S NATIONAL PUBLIC SERVICE MEDIA/YouTubeAs part of further shows based around International Women’s Day, RTÉ will also broadcast an hour-long documentary tomorrow called Women on Walls.The programme focuses on the first four female members of the Royal Irish Academy as well as eight living female scientist in the fields of science, technology, engineering and maths.Read: The pay difference between Irish men and women is getting bigger >Read: What Irish women want: ‘We must demand what is right and challenge what is frightening’ > By Rónán Duffy Wednesday 8 Mar 2017, 9:48 AM We are delighted to have an all female #FairCity episode on March 8th to mark #InternationalWomensDay #herecomethegirls! pic.twitter.com/PlOdo9byZ0— RTÉ Fair City (@RTEFairCity) March 6, 2017 We worked out about six months ago that we had a range of storylines that were being driven by women. So we thought it’d be great fun to have them all collide on the one night.DeCourcy says the plot has been “slightly orchestrated” to get all the women in the same place but that the episode will see a number of storylines coming to a head.“There are no men, they are off looking after the babies or they’re taking a little holiday or they’re at the other end of the phone, and we have about 11 or 12 of our really strong female characters fighting it out,”So there’ll be slaps and there’ll be secrets and there’ll be lies and there’ll be reveals and there’ll be lots of dancing. Fair City is having an all-female episode… and they’re all heading to the pub The show is celebrating International Women’s Day. 18,557 Views Mar 8th 2017, 9:48 AM last_img read more

La plus grande collection de chants et sons danimaux débarque sur Internet

first_imgLa plus grande collection de chants et sons d’animaux débarque sur InternetLe laboratoire d’ornithologie de l’université américaine de Cornell, dans l’État de New York, a numérisé sur son site Internet pas moins de 150.000 enregistrements appartenant à quelque 9.000 espèces animales.Savez-vous à quoi ressemble le chant d’une bécassine de Wilson ou d’un canard Fuligule à tête rouge ? Non ? Eh bien désormais il est possible de le savoir en quelques clics ! L’université américaine de Cornell qui possède un formidable laboratoire d’ornithologie a décidé de partager les très nombreux enregistrements de chants de toutes sortes d’espèces animales dont elle dispose. Pour en faire profiter tout le monde, les chercheurs ont ainsi mis sur leur site internet quelque 150.000 enregistrements appartenant à pas moins de 9.000 espèces. Il aura fallu une douzaine d’années pour numériser l’équivalent de 7.513 heures de sons, soit plus de 10 terabytes de données ! D’ores et déjà disponibles sur le site de la bibliothèque Macauley du laboratoire d’ornithologie, ces chants comportent aussi bien celui de lémurs que d’un morse, d’oiseaux, de baleines, de pingouin ou de reinettes. Le plus vieil enregistrement numérisé date du 18 mai 1929 et offre durant 9 secondes les vocalises d’un Bruant chanteur écouté au Stewart Park d’Ithaca.”Notre collection audio est la plus grande et la plus vieille du monde. Maintenant, c’est aussi la plus accessible”, a expliqué dans un communiqué Mike Webster, directeur de la bibliothèque. “Nous travaillons pour améliorer les fonctions de recherche et créer des outils que les personnes pourraient utiliser pour collecter les enregistrements et les télécharger directement dans les archives. Notre but est de rendre la bibliothèque Macaulay la plus utile possible pour le public”, a t-il ajouté.Des sons et chants utiles à tous À lire aussiDengue : symptômes, traitement, prévention, où en est-on ?Aujourd’hui, chaque enregistrement est présenté en mentionnant le nom de l’animal, la date d’enregistrement, le lieu et l’auteur de la captation, de même que l’habitat de l’animal au moment de l’enregistrement. La référence du fichier, sa localisation sur une carte et le type de son sont également précisés. Ainsi, la banque pourrait rendre de grands services à des publics très différents, chercheurs, amateurs d’oiseaux, réalisateurs de films voire développeurs d’applications.”Maintenant que nous avons numérisé les enregistrements auparavant archivés, l’équipe des archives se concentre sur du matériel nouveau fourni par des enregistreurs amateurs ou professionnels à travers le monde pour véritablement construire une collection”, a commenté de son côté Greg Budney, conservateur audio. “De plus, c’est juste un vrai plaisir d’écouter ces sons. Avez-vous déjà entendu le son d’un morse sous l’eau ? C’est un son incroyable”.Pour découvrir la fameuse collection, rendez-vous sur le site : http://macaulaylibrary.org/Le 2 février 2013 à 10:59 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

Manatee freed from drainage ditch in Fort Myers

first_imgFORT MYERS, Fla. (WSVN) — Authorities came to the rescue of a manatee that had become stuck in a drainage ditch in Fort Myers.Fort Myers Police officers, Lee County Sheriff’s Office deputies and Florida Fish and Wildlife officers responded to the trapped marine mammal off Summerlin Road and Brantley Road, Monday morning.Officers and deputies worked together to free the manatee.Officials said the animal was stuck in the ditch for about two hours.Rescue crews believe the sea cow traveled through the drain to the ditch during high tide on the river.The manatee was taken to Orlando for treatment and released into Horton Park in Cape Coral.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img

CEC asks law enforcers to create congenial voting atmosphere

first_imgChief election commissioner KM Nurul Huda. File photoExpressing the hope that Sunday’s national election will be held in a festive mood, chief election commissioner KM Nurul Huda on Friday urged the members of law enforcement agencies to create a congenial environment so that all can cast their votes as per their choice, reports UNB.“Huge aspirants are participating in the election. I hope, the election will be held in a festive mood,” he said.The CEC came up with the remarks while visiting the media booth at the Result Announcement Centre of Nirbachan Bhaban in the city.“I urge the members of law enforcement agencies to ensure security so that minority people can go to the voting centres, cast their votes and return home safely,” he said.Replying to a question about the fear of opposition parties, the CEC said, “We’re ready to prove them wrong. The voters will cast their votes in a festive environment.”last_img read more

Fraudulence in Russian polls say opposition NGO

first_imgA woman casts her vote for Russia`s presidential elections at the Russian embassy in Berlin on 18 March 2018. AFPRussian opposition activists and an NGO on Sunday reported ballot stuffing and multiple voting during the presidential election which is set to see Vladimir Putin win a fourth Kremlin term.The non-governmental election monitor Golos, which publishes a list of fraud cases online, by early afternoon had counted 1,764 irregularities, including observers prevented from carrying out their work.The movement of Alexei Navalny, Putin’s most vocal opponent who has been barred from standing in the election for legal reasons, said it had sent out 33,000 volunteers to monitor the election.Navalny’s website reported hundreds of cases of fraud, notably in Moscow and the region around the capital, Saint Petersburg and Bashkortostan in the Urals.Support for Putin is significantly lower in Moscow and Saint Petersburg than in Russia as a whole, according to recent official polls.Navalny supporters working as election monitors were prevented from entering some polling stations, a lawyer for the campaign said during a press briefing.Navalny himself tweeted a link to a video showing ballot stuffing in a polling station in Russia’s far east.The Central Election Commission said it will investigate.Some 80 per cent of polling stations are under video surveillance, according to the commission.In the absence of doubt over the outcome, the main focus of the election has become voter turnout-with the Kremlin seeking a strong mandate for Putin and Navalny calling for a boycott of polls he denounces as a sham.Opposition activists said they had also witnessed voters being bussed to polling stations by police and discount coupons being given to Russians who turned out to vote.last_img

Refreshing history

first_imgWith this thought, Doordarshan is set to telecast Dastan-E-Urdu, a new 13-part docu-drama series, bringing alive the fascinating history of this Indian language, breaking the myths by unveiling several interesting cross-cultural connections every Sunday at 9:30 pm.  Directed by Aparna Srivastava Reddy and produced by eminent Urdu activist Kamna Prasad, the 13 part series of Dastan-E-Urdu explores the journey of Urdu language and its mushtarqa tehzeeb. Be it literature, journalism or popular culture, expressed in recent times through theatre, films, television or the new media, Urdu language has retained its eminent place in the mind and hearts of people. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’In order to showcase the language’s grandeur and its tehzeeb in purest sense, Dastan-E-Urdu has deployed deep research into Urdu’s language journey, while conceptualising it. Dastan-E-Urdu takes the viewer on a pan-India journey, capturing all the aspects and nuances that underscore Urdu’s poetic opulence, its Ganga-Jamuni syncretic essence as well its everlasting, universal appeal.‘Understanding the evolution of Urdu, gives fresh insights into who we are as Indians’ is the bottom line of the show. Covering myriad shades and influences of Urdu language, the programme is being shot all over the country – from Kashmir to Kerala. It delves into dramatisation of key personalities and reconstructions of key periods in the history of the language. Galaxy of experts including Prof Gopi Chand Narang, Javed Akhtar, Prof Shamim Hanfi, Shamsur Rehman Farukhi, Pt Gulzar Dehlvi, Prof Mushirul Hasan, Dr Karan Singh and Farooq Sheikh among other stalwarts creates a panoramic view of Urdu’s evolutionary journey for the viewer. The music for the show is given by Shubha Mudgal.last_img read more

Super Smart Oven Wont Screw Up Dinner

first_img Hear from Polar Explorers, ultra marathoners, authors, artists and a range of other unique personalities to better understand the traits that make excellence possible. How Success Happens 3 min read June 12, 2015center_img Terrible cooks, take note: A new “smart” chef is coming to the rescue, a futuristic little oven that automatically recognizes the food you put in it and — voila — cooks it to perfection for you. All you have to do is rustle up the grub and turn a knob.The Jestsons-esque mini cooking machine is called the June Intelligent Oven. It’s a quad core processor-powered computer that cooks, toasts, roasts and bakes and broils, basically without any input from you, well, other than the food itself.Designed by former Apple engineers Nikhil Bhogal and Matt Van Horn, the touchscreen countertop cooker uses some fancy tech — “Food ID” algorithms, an internal HD camera and digital scales in its four “feet” — to figure out what you’ve placed inside of it, how hot to cook it to and for how long. Within seconds, it identifies the food and gets cookin’.Related: Modernist Cuisine’s Food Lab and the Science of FlavorFor a taste of what June does, dig in:“Like cruise control on your car, June continually calculates the power needed to maintain a constant temperature,” so says the product’s website. Cooking on cruise control. Now there’s a hot mess we can get behind.Goodbye constantly getting up to check on your food (and some of the sensual, experimental joys of cooking). Hello more of whatever else you’d like to do while it auto-cooks. You’ll know exactly the moment your food is done because the Wi-Fi-enabled oven lets you know on your smartphone. It sends push notifications to you via June’s free companion app, which — get this — lets you see (and drool over) a live video feed of your food as it cooks. You know, to build up your appetite and make you feel like you’re still in control. The app also invites you to indulge your forn addiction, enabling you to snap selfies of your noms and, yes, serve them fresh on Instagram, too.Related: This Unassuming Kitchen Tool Blocks Wi-Fi So You Can Take Back MealtimeRigged with carbon fiber heating elements, the gizmo heats to 350 degrees Fahrenheit in just about four minutes. As for what you can whip up with June, it’s designed to cook “pretty much anything.” Cookies, pies, meats, veggies, breads. You can even dry fruit in it, if you’re into that kind of thing.Bummer, not all foods are recognized by June just yet. The beta units, slated for release this fall, will only identify 15 commonly cooked ones to start. But its makers say the more people use it, the smarter it gets. They also plan to issue “Food ID” software updates over time. So fear not. June should eventually know that you like your ribeye roast medium rare. You’ll still be stuck on basting duty, though.At $1,500 a pop, June’s price tag seems a touch overcooked. Maybe not if you’re a kitchen tech collector or just plain sick of burning dinner. It’s available for pre-order today with a $95 deposit. Non-beta units are expected to ship next spring, hopefully in time for glazed Easter ham. Who’s hungry?Related: OMG Yes: A Smart Mattress Cover That Can Brew Your Morning Coffee Listen Nowlast_img read more

Highlights of the 2012 NCoBC Meeting Utilizing Social Media

first_img Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Technology Reports View all 9 items Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Videos | Women’s Health | March 29, 2012 Highlights of the 2012 NCoBC Meeting: Utilizing Social Media Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Highlights of the 2012 NCoBC Meeting: Utilizing Social MediaVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:23Loaded: 0.39%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:23 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018. center_img Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Molecular Imaging View all 22 items AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Find more SCCT news and videos Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Recent Videos View all 606 items Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Gary Levine, M.D., program chair/incoming president of the National Consortium of Breast Centers, discusses how breast centers can use social media to educate the public regarding breast health and their services at the 2012 NCoBC meeting, held in Las Vegas in March. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Conference Coverage View all 396 items Women’s Health View all 62 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Information Technology View all 220 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes.last_img read more

Puerto Viejo Voice

first_imgNo related posts. If you’re interested in learning more about energy or body work, check out the Healing Arts Courses at Bliss Healing Center in the Puerto Viejo Mall. Teachers Julie Hickey and Dan Springer offer a selection of trainings to suit your style. Attune to Reiki Level 1 Aug. 25 and 26.Other upcoming offerings include Thai massage and Cranio Sacral therapy. Bliss offers both levels 1 and 2 of these courses. A deposit of $50 holds your spot. Email info@blisscostarica.com for more information or call 2756-8224.A new program for children has been initiated at Centro Educativo Playa Chiquita. Wednesdays at 2 p.m., the center offers children’s community cinema; entrance fee and popcorn for only {1,000 ($2) per person. The Centro Educativo is also organizing books and accepting donations to begin opening the library to the community. If you would like to donate time, books or need more information, call 2750-0754.The current hot topic in the Caribbean is a voluntary annexation of the South Caribbean communities Cahuita, Puerto Viejo and Manzanillo to Panama. These communities are seeking union with the Bocas del Toro province. It’s popping up on our Facebook newsfeeds, Twitter accounts, and blogs, elperiodicocr.com, infierno.ticoblogger.com, our beloved Tico Times; everyone is piping in! Edwin Patterson (ex-diputado of the Citizen Action Party) has been the voice behind the movement, but many with homes and businesses within the Maritime Zone have backed him amid unrest with the Maritime Zone Law initiations.-Kristin Gilbert Ramirezkristinlgilbert@gmail.com  Facebook Commentslast_img read more

Top Stories

first_img Top Stories What an MLB source said about the D-backs’ trade haul for Greinke Cardinals expect improving Murphy to contribute right away Comments   Share   The Cardinals aren’t the only team interested in want-out quarterback Kevin Kolb.According to NBC Sports, the Seattle Seahawks offered the Eagles a first and third round pick for Kolb.The Eagles have seemed more interested in getting players in exchange for Kolb rather than draft picks, but if the organization listened to Seattle’s offer, it could be beneficial for the Cardinals.With rumors of Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie possibly being moved in a trade for Kolb, the Cardinals looked set to shock fans with who they were willing to give up in exchange for a proven starting quarterback.center_img The impact of a possible DRC trade could be lessened by the draft selection of Patrick Peterson, but the Cardinals could benefit from two excellent young corners.When the lockout comes to a close, the Cardinals will have to decide if Kolb is worth the loss of a possible key player, or, if the rumored Seattle offer turns out to be true, a few draft picks. Nevada officials reach out to D-backs on potential relocation D-backs president Derrick Hall: Franchise ‘still focused on Arizona’last_img read more