Gov. Wolf: Masks Help Stop the Spread of COVID-19

first_img June 23, 2020 Gov. Wolf: Masks Help Stop the Spread of COVID-19 Press Release,  Public Health Governor Tom Wolf today noted that research confirms the importance of wearing masks to stop the spread of COVID-19 and that Pennsylvanians are required to wear masks when entering any business in all counties in both yellow and green phases of reopening.“As most counties are in or will soon be in the green phase of reopening, mask-wearing is a vital measure to help stop the spread of COVID-19,” Gov. Wolf said. “Pennsylvania has emerged as a leader among states for reduced cases amid increased reopening and we want that to continue to keep people safe and healthy while returning to many of the activities we enjoyed before COVID.”The mask requirement is part of Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel’s Levine’s order, “Directing Public Health Safety Measures for Businesses Permitted to Maintain In-person Operations,” which pertains to all counties regardless of the phase of reopening. The order requires businesses to enforce mask-wearing unless someone has an underlying health condition that prevents them from wearing a mask. Children two or younger are not required to wear masks.According to a recent study in the Institute of Physics, wearing simple medical masks or improvised facial coverings reduces community exposures from asymptomatic, but unknowingly infectious, individuals.The study concludes that while people may perceive them to be ineffective or burdensome to wear, “wearing some form of exhaled barrier (mask) out in public during pathogen outbreaks is an altruistic act serving not only as a form of enhanced cough or sneeze etiquette, but also to reduce the aerosols emitted from normal breathing or when talking. Without daily testing, nobody can be certain that they are not an asymptotic disease vector. Scientifically, this is a positive step towards helping combat the current COVID-19 pandemic.”U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams took to twitter on Sunday to advise that mask-wearing is contributing to and not infringing on freedom, tweeting in part, “Some feel face coverings infringe on their freedom of choice- but if more wear them, we’ll have MORE freedom to go out.”In addition to mask wearing, Gov. Wolf and Sec. of Health Dr. Rachel Levine have advised that robust testing and contact tracing in green counties are keys to safe, phased reopening.The state continues to increase testing and ramp up contact-tracing efforts. As of June 18 (the most recent data available), there are a total of 518 contact tracers, and a total of 4,161 contacts being monitored.The Department of Health received a total of 89,350 test results in the past seven days, an average of 12,764 a day. The 30-day average of test results received is more than 13,934.There were 2,763 total cases added to investigations for the week of June 12 through 18.“Mask-wearing needs to be a part of our everyday routines,” Gov. Wolf said. “When you leave the house, grab your keys, your wallet and your mask. Mask-wearing has proven to be an important deterrent to the spread of the virus and keeping Pennsylvanians safe and healthy is the goal as we reopen and continue our mitigation efforts.”The state’s business guidance outlines mask-wearing requirements and additional safety parameters for both employees and customers.Read more on Gov. Wolf’s Process to Reopen PA here.Ver esta página en español.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Election night ends with surprise Trump victory over Clinton

first_imgRepublican presidential nominee Donald Trump won the 2016 election on Tuesday night, beating out Democrat Hillary Clinton in a narrow and largely unexpected victory.Of the 11 battleground states — Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin — nine went to Trump.There was a tense flip-flop between Trump and Clinton up until the last electoral votes came in. Bob Shrum, a political science professor at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences and longtime political consultant, explained his concerns when Donald Trump gripped 244 electoral votes.“At the beginning of the day, they said it would take a miracle for Donald Trump to win,” Shrum said. “At this point it would take a miracle for Hillary Clinton to win. She is losing states Democrats almost always carry.”It was a miracle that never came.Near 11:30 p.m. PST, Trump was able to win the state of Wisconsin and garner 276 total electoral votes, six votes more than the necessary number to be president. Shortly afterward, Clinton called Trump to concede the election.The results garnered mixed feelings in students watching the votes come in.Doctoral student Erica Silva met the results with uneasiness, especially in contrast to the optimism expressed in the 2008 and 2012 elections.“My freshman year, we watched Obama win the election, and the mood on campus was one of joy and hope,” Silva said. “Right now I think that the mood here is one of despair, one of shock, one of disbelief. We’re not really sure what’s going on.”Conservative voices were also present. Diego Hernandez, a sophomore majoring in physics, said that he was overjoyed and relieved by the prospect of a Trump presidency.“I think it [is] a very trying time for Americans, so in a sense I’m a relieved that Hillary didn’t win, mainly because of Supreme Court nominations,” Hernandez said. “We need to keep a conservative majority on the court. I’m hoping [Trump] will be able to get the recipe of success right, but I think no matter what he does he will always be a step above Clinton.”Over the past several weeks, most major polls had predicted a Clinton victory. As of Tuesday morning, The New York Times gave Clinton an 84 percent chance of winning, though the Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Daybreak Poll stood out for its prediction of a Trump win.Students largely reflected this divide between the polling predictions and the actual results, expressing surprise and shock.“I did not expect this at all. I thought it would be a very easy win for Hillary,” said Thomas Demoner, a junior majoring in business administration with a concentration in cinematic arts. “I never really took Trump seriously. I’m a little embarrassed, [because] he’s definitely going to decay the country’s image.”Sophie Greensite, a junior majoring in economics, mirrored Demoner’s statements, especially in regard to the numerous swing states that Trump won.“I’m worried for our country,” Greensite said. “Trump just instills such a divisive rhetoric in people, and I don’t stand for anything that he says. I think that he’s only going to serve to further separate our nation.”Ted Steinberg, a junior majoring in policy, planning and development, said that he accepts the results of the election despite being taken aback by them.“I am shocked but also somewhat ashamed that I’m shocked,” Steinberg said. “We always hear that the polls aren’t 100 percent, and here we are trusting the polls a little too much, in part out of a cautious optimism that I guess came around and bit us.”Senate results were announced on Tuesday night as well, with Republicans winning 51 seats and Democrats winning 47, leaving a Republican majority. The House of Representatives also maintained its Republican majority, with 235 seats announced to the Democrats’ 185.Nitika Johri, a senior majoring in cognitive science, said that the advent of a Republican president coupled with a Republican majority in Congress was extremely concerning.“I’m feeling pretty disheartened and a little bit scared,” Johri said. “A Trump presidency is scary enough, but what’s scary to me is also having Republicans hold the House and the Senate and what is going to happen with the Supreme Court justices. I feel scared not only for myself as a colored female, but I feel scared for a lot of the people who have expressed interest in being Democrats or being progressive.”last_img read more