Gardai suspect Falcarragh housefire was deliberate

first_imgGardai are investigating a suspicious fire which gutted a home in the Falcarragh area.The house at Upper Dunmore was vacant at the time and nobody was injured during the blaze which happened on Thursday night last.Gardai say they have not ruled out that the fire may have been started maliciously. The house is owned by a local man but he has not been living at the house for some time.Anybody with any information is asked to contact Gardai at Milford Garda station.Gardai suspect Falcarragh housefire was deliberate was last modified: October 8th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Falcarraghfiresuspiciouslast_img read more

Video: How to do the diski dance

first_imgStart learning the soccer-based moves of South Africa’s diski dance and you’ll start feeling the rhythm of African football – and the energy and passion that’s in store for the world at the 2010 Fifa World Cup.last_img

Facebook Graph Search: Noisier And Nosier Than Ever

first_imgTags:#Facebook#friends#Instagram#notifications#social media#twitter A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Related Posts Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verificationcenter_img In rolling out its new Graph Search, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was quick to caution that “it’s going to take years to index the whole map of the graph.”  That’s great.  It gives me time to completely remove myself from Facebook.When I dropped off Facebook a few weeks ago, it wasn’t in pursuit of some grand, moral crusade.  I was simply trying to show solidarity with my 13-year old son, who had become obsessed (addicted?) to a massively multiplayer game played on Facebook. When I took away his Facebook privileges in an attempt to help him kick the habit, I decided that a hiatus from Facebook would do me some good, too, and would show him that I wasn’t asking him to give up something that I, too, wasn’t willing to abandon.  Little did I suspect the incredible relief that would come from cutting out Facebook and Instagram from my life. (I kept Twitter, however, as it has become a useful business tool for me.)At the same time, to keep myself from slavishly staring at my iPhone all the time – again, not wanting to be a bad example for my son – I turned off all notifications. Then I did the same thing on my laptop. I wasn’t attempting a Digital Purge, as John Paul Titlow describes in ReadWrite: I simply wanted to control how and when I’d use my devices and their applications, rather than having them constantly clamoring for my attention. I wanted control.Peace At LastIt has been amazing.  I’ve felt more peaceful and thoughtful than I have in years. (Regular readers of my column here may disagree, but we’ll bracket that issue for now.)This reprieve from the onslaught of social media and its attendant army of notifications (“Lonn likes your post.  He really likes it!”) couldn’t have come at a better time, now that Facebook’s Graph Search is set to make it even easier for random people that I’ve accepted as “friends” to search my interests and take action based on them. (“Hey! I like The Hobbit, too! Want to go to the community theatre’s production of Bilbo and Me?” “You’ve eaten at Flour + Water. What should I get?”)Facebook was noisy before. Now it’s going to be nosy, too? No, thanks.Jon Mitchell is right: we need a unified search box, not a Facebook or Google or Apple walled-garden search experience. Google comes closest to this, but of course Facebook has siloed its “graph” such that Google can’t index it. That may be great for Facebook’s business, but it’s terrible for the user experience.  Having said that, if I have to let people scour my random postings across social media, I’d prefer them to be my friends. I just wish Facebook more accurately reflected who those friends actually are. We can’t manage more than 150 friends meaningfully, at least, according to Robin Dunbar’s influential research.  I must be slow, as I don’t even want to interact with those 150 friends when it comes to choosing a restaurant or a movie. There are few individuals that I trust on such matters: I either want an expert (Zagat) or the foolishness of crowds (Yelp). I don’t want my brother, who might hype me on the new dish at Olive Garden. (A fate worse than death!)In sum, I’m enjoying my life sans Facebook, and I imagine I’ll enjoy it even more now that Facebook wants to make it even easier to invade my personal space without real value in return. Maybe it will be useful for dating, but I have zero interest in this.I just want a place to hang out with real friends. It turns out that there’s an even better place to do this than Facebook. It’s called “the real world.” The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Matt Asaylast_img read more

Interview: Director of Photography Jake Swantko of Netflix’s Icarus

first_imgNot every documentary turns out the way you intend. Find out how this filmmaker pivoted to tell a remarkable story.All images via Netflix.We had the opportunity to sit down with the DP Jake Swantko of Netflix’s latest documentary, Icarus. This riveting documentary begins by attempting to reveal the truth about steroid use in sports. However, after consulting with a Russian scientist, the story takes a drastic turn from a Supersize Me-like experiment into a story of espionage while shining a light on one of the biggest scandals in sports history.PremiumBeat: Will you tell us a little bit about your background and how it led to your work on Icarus?Jake Swantko: Yes, well I come from a journalism background. I graduated from the University of Oregon with a degree in communications and then that program went on to basically become cinematography towards the end of my tenure in school. I started shooting documentaries right towards my senior year and then picked up a gig with National Geographic. It’s been a long road. I started off in Oregon and then lived in L.A. for about a year, then I moved to New York, and then briefly after I moved to New York I did some work during the Ukraine Revolution. After that I got a call from Bryan, probably two or three months after I did that work, and he basically told me about this idea for a project that he wanted to start shooting in a month in Boulder, Colorado. So he connected me to a producer who I worked with for quiet a while. I then basically met this guy in Colorado. It started off with this guy with all his belongings in an SUV.For me the camera’s always been able to speak the way I see. To be able to find so much of your voice with the camera, it’s been just a revelation throughout my career. It’s been great to become more of a cinematographer and learn and be able to capture the things as you want to imagine them. I think that’s always been the ethos of my work is to try and capture what I see. It was perfect for Brian and I to meet like that. He needed a journalist, or he needed somebody kind of with that background, and so yeah — I kind of just took off from there.PB: Will you tell us a little bit about the camera package you used on the film?JS: Yes, we used a Canon Vixia for sort of that Supersize Me candidness that you see a lot of in the film. We shot with a Canon C300 and a 24-70, 16-35, and a 70-200. The camera was just the perfect package for us. I shoot with that camera on a Glidecam HD2000 on the back of the motorcycle. The camera ended up being able to balance on the Glidecam. Also, the dynamic range and also the versatility to shoot both action sports but also be able to go incognito enough to go into these Moscow labs and shoot with Gregory. It was the camera to use. Then when the dual pixel autofocus came out, it made it much better to control.PB: The plot of the film almost completely changes; it does a complete 180. As a cinematographer did you have to adjust your shooting style and approach with that change in story or direction?JS: It’s funny, so I come from a journalism background. I had to switch my brain to shoot action sports, and then once it became this political sort of thing, I realized this is more conversation-based and less action. It was definitely at the beginning trying to figure out how to shoot action sports first and take chances with it. Once it became like this is, it was more like nothing strange.PB: As filmmakers was the plot change a gradual process and you happened to find yourself in this new story, or was it immediate and you had to make that quick decision to switch?JS: Well, it was gradual. It’s just weird how it all came about. The second trip of the races, we ended it in Geneva, and then we would leave from Geneva to Moscow to go talk with Gregory. There was kind of a gradual transition in the middle of it. Then when you go from over the course of three years, I guess anything is gradual. I mean when you start to look at it full circle, we started off with a Canon Vixia camera shooting this guy getting out of his car with all his belongings in Colorado. Then you’re filming a Russian chemist getting fingerprinted to enter into witness protection.PB: Did you have that feeling that you struck gold with where the story went?JS: Gregory certainly at one point said “Ryan you’re a very lucky  man.” With Gregory, he’s always saying very explicit and controversial things, but he’s just Gregory, you know. So it seemed like fun and games, and then, yeah — all of a  sudden it was this thing, and we were releasing documents to the New York Times, and the story was on the front page. Then it’s like Wow!PB: So I absolutely loved the lighting in your interviews. Can you tell me a little bit about your lighting approach for those?JS: I love to use pretty simple things to assist natural light as much as possible. I think the C300 is a great camera; its color rendition in daylight is so perfect. Basically what I would do is rig together an 85-watt fluorescent bulb in a china ball and push through silk. Then other than that, we had KinoFlos when we had bigger setups.PB: Will you tell us a little more about your GlideCam setup?JS: When I was approaching shooting and style, I was like I need to take more risk. I was up against the footage from the Tour de France where they have ENG cameras on motorcycles built out. I was going to have none of these and go like 100 miles an hour downhill. Plus, I had to shoot like 14- to 16-hour days. So I was like I’m trying using the C300 on the GlideCam, and it balanced.PB: What’s the main thing you want people to take away from your work on this film? JS: When you are a cinematographer like me, if you are coming from a journalism background, you kind of feel sort of the same things that I feel. Gregory is by far the most intelligent, charismatic, interesting character I’ve ever met. I really hope that people see him for that. There’s a lot of stigma around what he did and the measures he took to beat the system. I would just say (and to echo the film a little bit) he’s risking his life to do something extremely unpopular that no one wants to hear about. The goal of this film is to give him a voice and give whistleblowers like him a voice. There’s no incentive to do what he’s doing, no incentive whatsoever.last_img read more

Decisive Victory for Queensland at Defence Nationals

first_imgAll the championships on offer are heading to the sunshine state after an emphatic final day performance by Queensland teams at the 2017 Defence Nationals in Brisbane.In the Men’s Open division, ACT/Country qualified for the big dance with a thrilling one touchdown victory over North Queensland in the Semi Final. The win set up a showdown with South Queensland A, the front runners all tournament and seeking an impressive sixth consecutive championship in a row nonetheless.If there were any thoughts that this game would be a walkover, they were quickly squashed with both teams scoring five touchdowns a piece in an enthralling try for try first half.In the second half the South Queensland boys got a small break thanks largely to Liam Ross’s third score for the match –  a feat that would earn him the Player of the Final and eventually get his side to hold on to claim a 9-7 victory – their sixth consecutive Men’s Open championship.In the Plate Final Northern Territory A faced Sydney Metro, with the men from the territory edging out Sydney Metro 6-4 to claim the Plate Final.Men’s Open Grand Final Results: Championship:  South Queensland A defeated ACT/Country (9-7)Plate Final: Northern Territory A defeated Sydney Metro (6 -4)Player of the Final: #4 Liam Ross (South Queensland A)Player of the Series: #23 Stephen Holmes (ACT/Country)In the Men’s 30s final it was an all-South Queensland affair with the undefeated South Queensland A team up against their B team teammates. The match was closer than many predicted thanks to a gutsy effort by South Queensland B, however South Queensland A showed their class led by Daniel Judas (Player of the Final) to eventually run out winners 8-5 and maintain their undefeated status.Men’s 30s Grand Final Results:Championship: South Queensland A defeated South Queensland B (8-5)Player of the Final: #5 Daniel Judas (South Queensland A)Player of the Series: #13 Matthew McKeon (South Queensland A)After success in both Men’s divisions South Queensland were looking to complete the trifecta in the Women’s Open division, however they were met by a formidable North Queensland outfit who had been mighty impressive all tournament in the Final.Despite a fighting performance by the southern girls, North Queensland proved far too strong in the final running away with the game in the second half to record a comfortable 8-2 victory.Sheree O’Grady was outstanding all tournament receiving both the Player of the Final and Series awards to go with her championship medallion.The win ensured a decisive victory for Queensland teams at this years nationals.Women’s Open Grand Final Results: North Queensland defeated South Queensland (8-2)Player of the Final: #1 Sheree O’Grady (North Queensland)Player of the Series: #1 Sheree O’Grady (North Queensland)Whilst South Queensland narrowly missed out on a clean sweep of all divisions they were duly recognized as the Champion CB for 2017. Northern Territory received the Most Improved CB.CB Awards Champion CB: South Queensland Defense Touch AssociationMost Improved CB: Northern Territory Defense Touch AssociationFinally, congratulations to following individuals who made the 2017 Defence Nationals Merit Teams in recognition of their outstanding performances throughout the tournament.2017 Defence Nationals Merit Teams Fran Hanson (Team Leader)Annette Coleman (Team Leader) Fran Hanson (Team Leader)Annette Coleman (Team Leader) Women’s Open Merit TeamSheree O’Grady (North Queensland)Amanda Thomas (North Queensland)Brooke Moselen (North Queensland)Courtney Kerr (North Queensland)Tanielle Larkin (North Queensland)Nicola Emsley (North Queensland)Nikki Hall (South Queensland)Sarah Patterson (South Queensland)Rebecca Ringma (South Queensland)Pauline Glassie (South Queensland)Melinda Mckeon (South Queensland)Sallyanne Reiners (South Queensland)Isobel Ponte (Sydney Metro)Mary Yakuac (Sydney Metro) Men’s Open Merit TeamStephen Holmes (ACT / Country)Matthew Bowker (ACT / Country)Owen Winkley (ACT / Country)Neil Wakeling (ACT / Country)Jonte Heirdsfield (ACT / Country)Gilbert Patterson (Sydney Metro)S Collinson (North Queensland)David Krause (North Queensland)B Kingston (North Queensland)Joshua Woo (South Queensland A)Jaruis Nolan (South Queensland A)Liam Ross (South Queensland A)Steven Johnson (South Queensland A)Sam Davidson (Northern Territory A)last_img read more