NASA Commemorates Apollo 8 Genesis Reading

first_imgA major event for the 50th Anniversary of Apollo didn’t shy away from the historic Bible reading from the moon.Before reading our reaction to the NASA Event “The Spirit of Apollo” (Dec 11), watch Illustra’s video “Merry Christmas from the Moon” to see what was the centerpiece of Apollo 8:Merry Christmas from the Moon from The John 10:10 Project on Vimeo.Tuesday night December 11th, 2018, The Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum, in cooperation with NASA, held a commemoration of Apollo 8 at the National Cathedral in Washington DC. This was one of several major events for the 50th Anniversary of Apollo. Some consider Apollo 8 an even more significant historic event than the actual moon landing 7 months later (Apollo 11’s anniversary will be celebrated in July, 2019). You will see why in the statements below.Here are some comments from the event written in real time as the event took place. The program notes say,Apollo 8 was the first human mission to the Moon, and its crew were the first people to see the far side with their own eyes. The mission’s dramatic highlights included a live Christmas Eve broadcast during which the astronauts read verses from the Book of Genesis in lunar orbit, and the iconic Earthrise photo, which stunned the world with the beauty and isolation of our home in the cosmos.The evening’s speakers, including Apollo 8 astronaut Jim Lovell and Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church Michael Curry, will celebrate that moment of unity and the spiritual meaning of exploration embodied by the first flight to the Moon. A dramatic choral performance will recreate the famous Christmas Eve Broadcast. Apollo 8 challenged our understanding of human limitations. Fifty years later, we come together to honor the Spirit of Apollo.[Note: This is a summary, not a transcript. Quotations may not be exact due to rapid transcription in real time. Check the playback for actual quotes.]19:50 Music from Holst’s The Planets is playing (Mars, the Bringer of War and Venus, the Bringer of Peace) before the start of the program.20:00 Camera zooms in on the National Cathedral interior.20:02 The Very Reverend Randy Hollerith, Dean of Washington National Cathedral, calls Earth “God’s gracious gift.” Mentions that a piece of moon rock from Apollo is embedded in the cathedral’s “Space Window.”20:07 Ellen R. Stofan, PhD, recalls how NASA only told Commander Borman to ‘Do something appropriate‘ – so they read the creation story from the book of Genesis. For man’s new future in space, “they went back to the beginning.” Upon hearing the story of Genesis on Christmas Eve, even the flight engineers wept. Stofan mistakenly says twice that a million people were watching (it was more like a billion). She speculates on “What will be the reaction when we discover life?”20:13 Multimedia film “The Firmament” with choir and orchestra. Playback of impressions of the moon’s appearance by the astronauts. Choir interlude. Genesis reading played in its entirety, with choir voices and orchestra bells behind, and photos of the astronauts who read it.18:20 The Most Reverend Michael B. Curry, Presiding Bishop and Primate of the Episcopal Church, reads the Genesis passage again to the point, “Let there be light!” Quotes a black Baptist preacher James Weldon Johnson, author of “God’s Trombone,” who preached on Genesis in the 1800s. Johnson’s poetic version begins, “And God stepped out on space, and said, “I’m lonely: I’ll make me a world.” Curry remarks, “It’s not about us. We are part of a greater world.” We were made for a relationship of God who created us, with one another, and with the world, because God created it and cares about it. “And if you don’t believe me, talk to Jesus!” He quotes John 3:16. God so loved “the cosmos” that Christmas happened. We were made for God, for each other, and for this whole creation. “He’s got the whole world in his hands” he repeats:  “He’s got you & me brother … sister … the little bitty baby in His hands. Curry recalls how in 1968, three human beings summoned great courage, with NASA technology. A quarter million miles from home—almost by accident—the astronauts saw something no human being had ever seen before. And when they read from Genesis, “I wonder if God kind of gave a cosmic smile, and He said, ‘Now y’all see what I see.’”  God whispered in their ears, “Behold the world, the world of which you are a part. Look at its symmetry. Look at its beauty. Look at its wonder. Behold your world.” Some have said that was a moment that changed human consciousness forever. The Earthrise has been called one of the 100 most impactful photographs in all of human history. The environmental movement had its inspiration from that photograph, and from the reading of Genesis. Rev. Curry ventures off into climate change for a minute or two. Apollo’s legacy, he remarks, is a call for re-dedication to fly to new worlds, to use the wisdom of science & technology to save this oasis. “Good night, good luck, merry Christmas to all of us on this good Earth.”  Curry ends by singing “He’s got the whole world in His hands,” inviting the audience to join in.Earthrise from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, December 201520:38 Film with astronauts commenting on Apollo, including Anders, Borman, Lovell in their senior years. Anders said that Frank had chosen to read the book of Genesis. It shocked people but really got their attention.  Borman called Apollo a “uniquely American program,” but adds that “we came for all mankind.” Anders remarked that they saw the Earth the size of your fist at arm’s length. “We came to discover the moon,” he said, “but what we really discovered was the Earth.”20:41 Jim Bridenstine, NASA Director, follows up on Rev Curry by saying “It’s absolutely true that God does hold the entire world in His hands.” He recounts the Apollo 1 disaster the previous year, and multiple failures in Apollo 6 in August 1968 (it wasn’t called a failure at the time). Apollo 8 was four months away, and not ready! One out of every four people on Earth tuned in to the broadcast to hear the astronauts read Genesis 1:1-10, including those in the Soviet Union, where Christmas was still illegal. Bridenstine shifts gears toward the future: “We are going forward to the moon,” he says, “to stay.” He announces goals for sustainable, reusable architecture, with commercial and international partners. “Today we heard the astronauts read from Genesis,” that there was a firmament in the heavens, which Bridenstine says represents empty space. There, the waters below the firmament were separated the waters above. People in 1968 believed the moon was bone dry. Now we know that there are hundreds of billions of tons of water ice on the surface of the moon, at the poles. This can provide rocket fuel and drinkable water. ‘Gateway’ will be a permanent command module able to ferry machines and astronauts to the surface of the moon and back. Open architecture means that any country will be able to see how we do it, including private individuals and commercial companies. Goals are to retire the risk, prove the technology, prove the capability, understand human physiology, and replicate as much as possible on our journey to Mars. Remarks again about the waters above and below the firmament. When our Apollo astronauts read that, they didn’t know water existed anywhere else. Now we know of oceans below Europa and 10 miles below Mars. Is there life on other worlds? We don’t know, but Mars has methane emissions that fluctuate with the seasons; also complex organic compounds. These are exciting times, Bridenstine says. They don’t guarantee life is on Mars, but are consistent with the possibility. Lovell’s words about waters above the firmament had very real meaning. NASA is following the water, discovering life. Bridenstine introduces Jim Lovell as one of his heroes, astronaut on Gemini 7 & 12, Apollo 8 and Apollo 13. Lovell comes up to the podium.“For the Beauty of the Earth” — our fragile planet seen from the Suomi NPP spacecraft, 201220:54  Lovell gets a standing ovation from the audience. He recounts the bad summer of 1968. Protests against an unpopular war, beginnings of a “metoo movement” with women burning their bras, and hippies on the rise. After Gemini, Lovell was looking forward to an Apollo flight, but the Apollo 1 disaster that killed three of his friends delayed the Apollo program for 10 months. Lovell describes Borman & Anders, his co-pilots. The Lunar Module, they learned, was not going to be ready. The US also gained intelligence that the Russians were planning a lunar flight before the year was out, after three successful unmanned flights in the Zond series, including one that flew around the moon. Zond 7 was being prepared for a manned flight in December. NASA official George Lowe had a brilliant idea, provided the Command Module were certified in October, to launch Apollo 8 to moon and go into lunar orbit. In addition to numerous scientific benefits, and opportunities to check the Apollo technologies, it would give America the uplift it needed. But they only had four months to prepare. The Saturn V booster still had problems. NASA officials would only approve the risky flight if Apollo 7 were successful. For Borman, the possibility answered his dream. Anders as disappointed, because as Lunar Module pilot he wouldn’t have a working LM. “I was delighted,” Lovell recalls, because it would be “a mini-Lewis and Clark Expedition” to go where others had not gone before. On Dec 21,in the early morning, as he watched the press vehicles, “Suddenly I realized I was going to the moon.” All that navigation training was for real. At 7:21, Apollo 8 launched. There was no sign of a Russian launch. The crew entered lunar orbit entered on dark side, and the moon was nowhere to be seen. Shards of sunlight illuminated craters 60 miles below as they approached lunar sunrise. “I was observing alive that part of the moon that had been hidden from man for millions of years. “Then looking up, I saw it” – the Earth, a blue and white ball 240,000 miles away. I thought, my world has always been only as far as I can see: the horizon, the walls of a building. Seeing Earth 240,000 miles, he recalls, “my world suddenly expanded to infinity.” He pressed his thumb up against the window, and it completely hid the earth. “Everything I knew was behind my thumb,” I thought. “I realized my home is a small planet, just a mere speck in our Milky Way galaxy, and lost to oblivion” in the universe. I began to question my own existence; how do I fit into the world I see? I remembered thinking, “I hope to go to heaven when I die.” I went to heaven when I was born, he says, reflecting on we live on a planet with all the essentials for life, around “a star just the right distance that caused life to evolve in the beginning,” he continues. “God gave mankind a stage upon which to perform. How the play ends is up to us.” By all means, the flight of Apollo 8 was a complete success. Orbiting the moon on Christmas provided the spiritual environment on which to inspire the world with the reading of Genesis. He mentions Apollo 13 in passing; “that’s another story,” he quips. In Apollo 8, the American public got the real gift. He recalls a telegram received by the crew: “Thanks: you save 1968.” When Lovell accompanied the aged Charles Lindbergh to launch of Apollo 11, looking back at Lindbergh’s perilous 34-hour flight from New York to Paris, Lindbergh remarked, “Apollo 11 will be quite an accomplishment, but your flight Apollo 8 from the earth to the moon, that’s the flight I will remember.” applause.Earthrise from Selene spacecraft (2007), envisioned through an Apollo-style porthole window.~18:05 Richard Attenborough film. He gives his thoughts: How isolated and lonely we are here on Earth. In Apollo 8, we had not lost our connection to the natural world; we had rediscovered it. Something extraordinary: a grand competition between Russia and the USA led to a grand discovery. Apollo 8 gave us the dawn of planetary awareness. 50 years later, we are at high noon. The discovery of Earth urges our responsibility to protect the Earth. That American inspiration united us, and assured us that any feasible goal is within our grasp. Let us always remember the moment we left Earth for the f1st time and discovered what is truly precious – all of us together on the good earth.18:09  Hollerith: God bless you, may He bless us and keep us, and may we always be reaching for the stars.If you missed the event, I recommend watching the recording at the Air & Space Museum website. There are some things we can complain about, as with any public “spiritual” event, but much of the program was reverent and inspiring. For instance, there was open acknowledgement of God as Creator – and not a distant Creator, but one who cares for us and for His world. The Darwin-only atheistic materialism normally fluent at NASA was notable for its absence. Also, there was no hint of syncretism, trying to include the gods of other religions with the Creator. No, this is the God of Genesis! And to have John 3:16 quoted in a NASA event may be historic.Also memorable are the impressions of James Lovell, now 90 years old, of that famous view of the Earthrise 50 years ago. It’s amazing to me that no one at NASA realized that opportunity in advance. The pressure of the space race may have caused them to overlook it. Lovell also recounted being struck by the bland, gray surface of the moon compared to the blue-and-white gem of the Earth, so small in the darkness that he could cover it with his thumb. The music, film clips and quotes did justice to the spiritual import of that flight. It was also a celebration of American ingenuity and risk taking. Bridenstine recounted how many things went wrong with the earlier Apollo tests and flights: the Apollo 6 Command Module’s engine, for instance, which would have to re-ignite half a dozen times for Apollo 8, failed to re-ignite once after its first use on Apollo 6 in August. Other mishaps he described made the decision to orbit the moon just four months later seem reckless, and yet the Americans did it, and that during a year of political turmoil and social upheaval. So many things that could have gone wrong did not. I like to think God helped. We can look back with pride and joy at that inspiring mission, and not have our Christmases forever after ruined by the thought of dead astronauts orbiting the moon in a tin can. Several of the speakers also mentioned the perfection of Earth for human habitation. We live on an ideal planet around an ideal star, suggesting that humans have significance despite being specks in a vast universe (see Illustra’s short film, “Pale Blue Dot“).Allow us to make one theological correction to Rev. Curry’s quote of James Weldon Johnson’s poem, that begins, “And God stepped out on space, and said, ‘I’m lonely. I’ll make me a world.’” Many of our readers know that God did not create because He was lonely. He is a Trinity, self-existing in eternal relationship, and did not need to create. Secondly, He didn’t step out on space, because space, time and matter were all part of creation: “In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth” (Genesis 1:1). God is transcendent above all space, time and matter. We don’t want to be nit-picking here; we realize that Johnson, a godly preacher, was doing poetry, not theology or science. In fact, Johnson’s poem has been used in dramatic readings for years at one of America’s fundamental colleges in the south, Bob Jones University. It works very well in that context. It is very inspiring if you don’t take it as a piece of systematic theology. Envision an old black preacher waxing eloquent about Genesis 1 in a poor black church many years ago, with exuberant joy from the pulpit and rousing “Amen”s from the congregation, and you will be blessed by the poem. Watch William Warfield recite it in this YouTube video.So we vote thumbs up on the NASA celebration of Apollo 8. Nevertheless, whenever there is a public display of spirituality, you have to take many statements with a grain of salt. Political correctness goes with the territory: human fault for climate change, the universal brotherhood of man, evolution (mentioned only briefly in passing), and the search for life on other worlds. Overall, though, it was unusual and praiseworthy to see a NASA event that (1) affirmed the God of Genesis with reverence, (2) made abundant use of the idea of a good Creation for a purpose, (3) spoke of the goodness and beauty of the Earth, (4) affirmed the spiritual value of the mission, and (5) mentioned Jesus and John 3:16, and (6) wished everyone a Merry Christmas. That was a really nice gift to the American people.As December 24 approaches, we encourage you to share Illustra Media’s “Merry Christmas from the Moon” on social media as widely as possible. Don’t wait; right now is the best time. (Visited 1,070 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Consultants to get Medupi on track

first_img11 July 2013South African Public Enterprises Minister Malusi Gigaba, saying he was “extremely disturbed” by further delays to the completion of Eskom’s Medupi coal-fired power station, has brought in independent consultants to get the state company’s build programme running efficiently.Speaking at the release of Eskom’s annual results in Johannesburg on Wednesday, Gigaba said the government had prioritised South Africa’s infrastructure programme as the key driver of job creation, skills development and the industrialisation of the economy.“The importance of delivering on capacity expansion projects to increase overall Eskom generating capacity cannot be understated. I’m extremely disturbed by these further delays being experienced.”Consultants’ brief ‘broader than Medupi’Gigaba said the Department of Public Enterprises had commissioned independent consultants to look at Eskom’s project management capabilities and assess the risks and cost escalations of the state company’s build programme.The scope of the consultants’ task was “broader than Medupi,” encompassing Eskom’s entire build programme, he said.The results of their study, expected in two months’ time, would help Eskom and the government to craft a way forward, Gigaba said, adding that the revised date for Medupi’s first power delivery “puts pressure” on South Africa’s already constrained electricity supply.Eskom announced on Monday that the first unit of the Medupi station was unlikely to deliver first power by the December 2013 delivery date, but was only likely to do so in the second half of 2014, due to technical as well as labour issues.Govt, Eskom to meet with contractorsMedupi, one of the two large coal-fired stations that Eskom is building, is a 4 764 MW coal-fired power station located near Lephalale. It will the first South African power station to have “super-critical” technology, and one of the world’s largest dry cooled stations, so it will much more efficient than older coal-fired stations.The other station, Kusile, is located in Mpumalanga province and will have the same technology but with the addition of flue-gas desulphurisation, a state-of-the art technology used to remove oxides of sulphur from the exhaust flue gases in power plants that burn coal or oil.Department of Public Enterprises Director-General Tseliso Matona and senior Eskom officials are to meet with Alstom – one of the major contractors at Medupi – in France in order to discuss the events of the Limpopo plant. The other major contractor is Hitachi.Gigaba on Wednesday expressed support for Eskom’s possible penalising of non-performing contractors, but added: “This doesn’t preclude other remedial actions. It is important to be forward thinking. The study will inform corrective action. We should not make rash decisions that could impact the build programme.”Profit ‘to be reinvested in the business’Eskom reported group revenue of R128.9-billion for the financial year ended 31 March 2013, up from R114.8-billion in 2012, an increase of 12.2%.Eskom said the results reflected the impact of the 16% tariff increase granted by the National Energy Regulator of SA (Nersa) for 2012/13 and declining demand for electricity due to lower economic growth and industrial unrest.The utility said revenue growth had been offset by escalating operating expenditures, mainly due to an increase in primary energy costs.The utility’s net profit decreased from R13.2-billion in 2011-12 to R5.2-billion in 2012-13.The profits would be reinvested in the business, chief executive officer Brian Dames told Wednesday’s briefing, noting that Nersa’s decision to limit Eskom’s tariff increases would require new thinking from Eskom.The company had been able to keep the lights on, despite it being a tough year, he said, with Eskom for the first time conducting maintenance work at its plants over the winter period.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Commodity leaders join forces on sustainability research

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The National Pork Board (NPB), United Soybean Board (USB) and National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) announce the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on a sustainability research platform that will benefit all three organizations and their producers. This research program will include the sharing of completed research, coordination on current and planned research and define ways to share and communicate results with each organization’s members.Leadership from the three commodity groups agree that it is prudent to consider specific ways in which they might work together more effectively to ensure alignment and collaboration in sustainability research and how the results can and will be communicated and shared.“Sustainability is defined by the We Care ethical principles pork producers established over 10 years ago,” said Steve Rommereim, National Pork Board President, a pig farmer from South Dakota. “Joining in the efforts of two other organizations, as a collective group, we can more effectively spend producer dollars to achieve the goals we can all believe in and support. Without one, we wouldn’t have the other.”An overarching goal of proactive, continuous improvement is a shared focus among pork, soybean and corn producers.“Most farmers are invested in multiple commodities and invested in more than one of our organizations, so it’s important that we are collaborating wherever we can,” said Lewis Bainbridge, USB chair and soybean and livestock farmer from South Dakota. “We need to be supportive of one another, especially now when there’s more interest in what we’re doing to produce our commodities. We need to be looking at the big picture of how our commodities work together and take that a step further.”Through combined communications efforts and outreach, the organizations can increase the education, capacity and motivation of pig and grain farmers to adopt conservation measures that deliver benefits to the environment and to farm resilience and profitability.“NCGA’s targeted focus — whether it’s policy, market development or research — is to grind more corn and do it profitably. However, in areas like sustainability and research where we share goals and values in our industry, it is just plain smart to work in collaboration,” said Lynn Chrisp, NCGA president of Hastings, Nebraska. “This memorandum will encourage increased communications, further sharing of staff and funding resources, pool expertise, and ultimately makes us all more effective.”A task force of farmer representatives from NPB, USB and NCGA will be formed and, with support from each organization, will be responsible for managing and evaluating the activities outlined in the MOU. Additionally, the task force will track progress and evaluate the value and impact of the MOU upon completion of all activities.last_img read more

Set up anti-trafficking units, HC tells W.B.

first_imgThe Calcutta High Court has directed the West Bengal government to set up an anti-human trafficking unit headed by a specially trained officer, preferably a woman, in every district of the State.Any FIR registered under the sections of Immoral Trafficking (Prevention) Act, 1956, and sections 370, 372, 373 of the Indian Penal Code or under the provisions of the POCSO Act, involving commercial sexual exploitation of women, should be investigated by the anti-human trafficking unit, the High Court said in its order. The police station where the FIR is registered will hand over such cases to the unit in 24 hours, stated the order delivered last week by a Division Bench of Justices Ravi Krishan Kapur and Joymalya Bagchi.Alarming numbers The direction assumes significance as Bengal has recorded the maximum cases of trafficking in the country. According to the latest NCRB data, Bengal in 2016 recorded 3,579 cases of human trafficking (44%) among 8,132 cases recorded in the country. The Bench gave the order while cancelling the anticipatory bail granted to Sangita Sahu, owner of a hotel in Joka area, by a lower court.She is accused under ITPA, POSCO Act and sections of IPC dealing with human trafficking. The Bench noted that “the menace of trafficking of women and minors have assumed alarming proportions”, and expressed concern over the “lackadaisical manner in which offences involving commercial sexual exploitation of women and children like the present one are investigated, prosecuted and/or pursued”. The High Court’s direction has been welcomed by a number of non-government organisations working against commercial sexual exploitation of children and women.Saji Philip, director of operations, International Justice Mission, Kolkata, the organisation which aided the investigative agencies in the raid at Ms. Sahu’s hotel in September 2017 where 30 people were arrested, called the order a “fresh lease of life in dealing with cases relating to trafficking of children and women”. “This order will strengthen existential directives and aim at fixing the lacunae in each step of trafficking cases, including rescue, rehabilitation and prosecution,” Mr. Philip said.last_img read more

JD(U) becomes a recognised State party in Arunachal Pradesh: EC

first_imgThe Janata Dal (United), headed by Bihar Chief Minister Nitish Kumar, has become a recognised State party in Arunachal Pradesh, the Election Commission has said. The JD(U) won seven Seats in the 60-member Assembly of the north eastern State, next only to the ruling BJP which bagged 41 Seats and secured a majority.“The Janata Dal (United) is now a recognised State party in the States of Arunachal Pradesh and Bihar,” a statement from the Election Commission said on Friday. The Party will also be able to use its symbol arrow in Arunachal Pradesh, the statement added. The JD(U) shares power with the BJP and Ram Vilas Paswan’s Lok Janshakti Party in Bihar. After its success in Arunachal Pradesh, the JD(U) national general secretary K.C. Tyagi had said, “The tally entitles us to the status of the main Opposition party. But we will offer full support to the BJP government” in that State.“Even if we get the Opposition party status, we will be a friendly Opposition,” Mr. Tyagi had made it clear.last_img read more

ESPN’s FiveThirtyEight Releases Updated College Football Playoff Probability Rankings

first_img538 week 11 playoff probability rankings.Twitter/@andrewflowersEvery week, ESPN’s advanced statistics-based FiveThirtyEight updates its probability rankings for the College Football Playoff, utilizing three different sets of rankings: the selection committee’s most recent Top 25, in-house Elo ratings, and ESPN’s predictive FPI. This week, FiveThirtyEight‘s top three teams match what the selection committee has, but No. 4 is a slight surprise: the Oklahoma Sooners. OU is aided by a No. 1 ranking by FPI, jumping them over teams like Notre Dame and Oklahoma State.For more on how FiveThirtyEight’s system works, read this by the site’s editor, Nate Silver. Here is the probability ranking table:Q: Notre Dame, what’s in your rearview mirror? A: the Big 12 coming for your playoff spot: https://t.co/FtHBJPCoM6 pic.twitter.com/BDsWBFe55N— Andrew Flowers (@andrewflowers) November 18, 2015[FiveThirtyEight]last_img read more

Montreal to chop 4000 ash trees on Mount Royal sickened by emerald

first_imgMONTREAL – The City of Montreal will chop down 4,000 ash trees on picturesque Mount Royal because they have been attacked by an invasive strain of beetle from Asia.“This isn’t a decision we’re making lightly, cutting trees on Mount Royal, 4,000 is a lot,” Coun. Luc Ferrandez, the executive committee member responsible for parks, said Wednesday.“It isn’t good news, but the way we’re responding is good.”Natural Resources Canada says the emerald ash borer has killed millions of ash trees in southwestern Ontario, Michigan and surrounding states and “poses a major economic and environmental threat to urban and forested areas in both countries.”The beetle was first detected in Canada and the United States in 2002 and spread east quickly to regions where ash trees were prevalent.In Montreal, officials awarded a contract to have the trees felled in the next year as they are deemed too far gone to receive the required insecticide treatment.Ferrandez said the cutting won’t leave any visual effect on the landscape and that the city will plant 40,000 replacement trees, mainly red oaks and maples.Jim Fyles, director of the Morgan Arboretum and Molson Nature Reserve at McGill University, says 4,000 is still but a small percentage of the mountain’s entire forest canopy of more than 100,000 trees of various types.“We have the emerald ash borer that is working its way through Montreal and lots of trees have been cut in the last five years,” said Fyles.“Likely those trees (identified by the city) will die between now and five years from now or 10 years from now and, in that situation, it’s prudent to be proactive about it.”Montreal and other communities have invested in a treatment, required every two years, at a heavy cost, depending on tree size.Scientists with the Canadian Forest Service, which is part of Natural Resources Canada, have estimated that costs to Canadian communities for treatment, removal and replacement of affected trees could be $2 billion over a 30-year period. There would also be other environmental impacts.The beetle has also been identified in 21 U.S. states and Fyles said some of those jurisdictions have lost all of their ash trees.“We’re more or less at the northern edge of where the emerald ash borer is now,” he said, adding it hasn’t moved as quickly as he thought it might.It’s hard to say how long the species will survive but, without ash trees, they starve and don’t move on to other types of trees.“Eventually, the whole thing will stabilize a bit because the treated ones will be healthy and untreated ones will be dead, but that’s how it’s unfolding now,” Fyles said.last_img read more

Commentary Lenzelle Smith Jr deserving of more recognition

Senior guard Lenzelle Smith Jr. (32) drives to the basket during a game against Delaware Dec. 18 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU won, 76-64.Credit: Mark Batke / For The LanternAaron Craft. LaQuinton Ross. Amir Williams.These are the names that come to mind first when most people think about the No. 3-ranked Ohio State men’s basketball team (15-0, 2-0).Someone that doesn’t often make the headlines is senior guard Lenzelle Smith Jr.Smith Jr., the team’s lone senior aside from Craft, has been huge for the Buckeyes all season.Currently second on the team in scoring with an average 12.7 points per game, and third on the team in both rebounding and assists with 4.9 and 1.6 respectively, Smith Jr. should be one of the stars of the team.And yet he is less talked about then certain bench players like athletic junior forward Sam Thompson and sophomore guard Amedeo Della Valle.The respect that Smith Jr. garners is not befitting of someone as vital as he is to the Buckeyes’ chances to success. He has scored in double figures in 11 of OSU’s 15 games this year, including a season high 20 in a 65-50 win against Wyoming Nov. 25.But perhaps Smith Jr.’s best performance of the season came when he was at his worst.Against Notre Dame Dec. 21, the Buckeyes were in danger of losing for the first time this season. Trailing by eight points with less than a minute remaining, OSU needed something to change to keep their unbeaten run alive.That change came in the form of Smith Jr.Failing to score up to that point in the game, Smith Jr. was struggling to make an impact. But in the final 50 seconds, he scored nine points and helped the Buckeyes go on a 14-3 run to win the game.Even though the final box score reads only nine points, Smith Jr.’s contribution was the difference in the final stretch.Players like Craft and Ross deserve their recognition, both are fantastic players, but the shadow they cast should not completely hide the work Smith Jr. has been doing for OSU.He is third on the team in minutes, just behind Craft and junior guard Shannon Scott, with an average of 27 a game. He is also third on the team in field goal percentage, behind only the teams two centers, and second in 3-point percentage.Although the season is not yet half over, the Buckeyes will need Smith Jr. to continue his stellar play if they hope to make another deep run in the NCAA tournament.Maybe then the senior guard not named Craft will be recognized by Buckeye fans for everything he has done. read more

Trippier backs Kane for being the captain

first_imgGareth Southgate decided to name Harry Kane the England national team captain over Jordan Henderson and Kieran Trippier insisted that it was a good choice by the manager because Kane is a great leader.Trippier is Kane’s teammate from Tottenham Hotspurs and they are about to play together in the national team as well – he insisted that the English star has helped the youngster a lot and he is a great role model.The full-back spoke about Kane’s leadership as he said, according to Football London🙂“I didn’t know anything about it. He is a top professional, on and off the field.”“He helps all the youngsters out at Tottenham, and us. He’s a real leader, all the boys know that and I couldn’t be happier for him.”Jadon Sancho, Borussia DortmundCrouch: Liverpool could beat Man United to Jadon Sancho Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Peter Crouch wouldn’t be surprised to see Jadon Sancho end up at Liverpool one day instead of his long-term pursuers Manchester United.“He’s got that fire inside him like everybody. He’s not the one to talk bad about people off the field.”“He’s just a top lad, top professional and I couldn’t be any happier and I think the lads are as well.”“We’ve got leaders all the way around the dressing room, everyone’s a leader.”“Everyone will help each other out – that’s the most important thing.”last_img read more

UAE wants to show the nations global sporting credentials

first_imgThe country will host the FIFA Club World Cup in December in the cities of Abu Dhabi and Al Ain; so far four teams are qualified: Real Madrid, Chivas de Guadalajara, Team Wellington and Al-AinThe United Arab Emirates will host the FIFA Club World Cup in December, and Abu Dhabi wants to amplify the country’s international credentials for supporting world-class sportings events, reported Emirates New Agency WAM on Sunday.“The FIFA Club World Cup is now intrinsically linked to Abu Dhabi since the emirate has hosted three previous editions and we’ve done a good job as far as FIFA, sponsors, teams, and fans are concerned. All of the feedback from previous years has been overwhelmingly positive,” Major General Mohammed Khalfan Al Romaithi said.videoOFFICIAL: Qatar will host the next two Club World Cups Manuel R. Medina – June 3, 2019 FIFA has announced today that the next two competitions will be played as planned, after meeting today in Paris.The tournament will take place between December 12th to the 22nd, with eight matches played between the cities of Al Ain and Abu Dhabi. The competition will feature continental club champions from six FIFA confederations: Europe (UEFA), Oceania (OFC), Africa (CAF), Asia (AFC), South America (CONMEBOL), North and Central America and the Caribbean (CONCACAF), and host team Al Ain FC.“Personally, I would love to see a really popular team from Africa – perhaps an Egyptian team – because it would really boost attendances in specific matches at the start of the tournament. In terms of Asia, we’re hoping for a confederation champion that corresponds with a large community living in Abu Dhabi. This is key to maximizing attendance from fans living in the UAE,” added Al Romaithi.A FIFA delegation will visit the country in September to check out the infrastructure available for the tournament, such as stadiums and training pitches, but according to Al Romaithi, the local organization team is already one step ahead.last_img read more