No “criminal” liability – Granger

first_imgPharmagate… rather administrative errorsIn light of mounting calls for the Government to sanction Public Health Minister Dr George Norton over the highly controversial $12.5 million Sussex Street, Georgetown ‘drug-bond’ deal, President David Granger has pointed out that the issue is merely an “administrative error” and did not warrant any criminal liability.Speaking on the weekly television programme – The Public Interest – the Head of State explained that at the time, pharmaceuticals were brought due to the high demands from hospitals across the country. He noted that after unfavourable proposals from the existing facility, the Public Health Minister opted to rent a facility that was in the city so that there can be easy access to the drugs for distribution.“Those would have been mitigations for the action that was taken… So there was no criminality, it was a question of trying to get the job done and errors were made. But the Minister apologised and we have corrected those errors. As far as I’m concerned, we have now put in place a system which will prevent a reoccurrence,” the President stated.According to the Head of State Bond, following an investigation Cabinet has considered recommendations made and has determined that henceforth, the Ministry of Public Infrastructure will oversee the rental of facilities for its sister-ministries.“We learnt now that the subject ministry is not necessarily the best judge of the suitably of a particular premise or facility to be rented, and we have now moved that responsibility under the Ministry of Public Infrastructure,” the President declared.Moreover, it was pointed out to President Granger during the television programme that in its 15 months in office, his administration has experience some incidents that has basically damaged its “brand”. The reporters explained that there have been calls on numerous occasions for Cabinet members to be disciplined and/or removed from office, as in the case of Dr Norton.However, the Head of State posited that there will be no reshuffling of his Cabinet. He stated that the changes made at the beginning of 2016 are designed to be improve Cabinet’s performance, that is, the creation of the Ministry Public Telecommunications and moving Tourism under the portfolio of the Business Ministry.Nevertheless, Granger admitted that there have some “errors” made by members of his Cabinet but he was quite to highlight that those were not as a result of criminal acts. He noted that within the 15 months in office, there have been human errors, administrative errors and errors stemming from situations that were inherited from the previous administration.“Yes we accepted that there have been errors but those errors are not really as a result of criminality, they’ve been administrative errors and they have been corrected. Every government makes errors but we want to make sure that we are free and fair,” he stated.Furthermore, President Granger noted that whenever something happens involving a Cabinet Member that is damaging to government, then an investigation is launched.“Whenever necessary, we have asked ministers to explain and give reasons for their conduct and those matters are dealt with at Cabinet level,” he remarked. (Vahnu Manickchand)last_img read more

Biological Designs Worth Imitating

first_imgTaking that lesson to heart, scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison are using the decellularized husks of plants such as parsley, vanilla and orchids to form three-dimensional scaffolds that can then be primed and seeded with human stem cells to optimize their growth in the lab dish and, ultimately, create novel biomedical implants.DNA computers are coming along, says Live Science. Tia Ghose writes, “Computers of the Future May Be Minuscule Molecular Machines.” Inspired by DNA’s longevity and extreme storage density, scientists have already encoded the entire works of Shakespeare in the genetic molecules (see article at Evolution News and hear it on ID the Future). Now that biology has shown the way to efficient data storage, engineers at DARPA are looking at other molecules that could encode in new ways beyond silicon’s 1’s and 0’s and DNA’s A-C-T-G system, using orientation, size and color to represent additional bits of information.Power plants. Bio-engineers have been trying to replicate photosynthesis for years, but still seem to have a long way to go. Science Daily says that a Japanese team has uncovered another part of the mechanism the plant uses to break down water, “marking another step towards the potential development of artificial photosynthesis.”Algae petrol. Imagine how much better it would be to create fuel from an abundant, renewable resource: algae. The Japanese are looking at this green gold: “Microalgae can grow with light, water, carbon dioxide and a small amount of minerals, and their cells divide quickly, meaning that they can be harvested faster than land-based biomasses,” Science Daily says. “Algae can also be harvested all year round, potentially offering a more stable energy supply.”Sperm therapy. To get ingredients to a female with cancerous tumors, why not imitate one of nature’s best delivery systems? Phys.org reports that German scientists are developing steerable sperm to do just that. They coax the expert swimming cells into little iron helmets, then steer them where they want them to swim. There are problems with the concept, though; how to shed the helmets after delivery, “And then there is the problem of obtaining the sperm.” There will undoubtedly be volunteers.Borrowing from nature is an age-old theme in science.Improving on nature? An article on Phys.org claims that a new technology is “better than nature” – “artificial biofilm increases energy production in microbial fuel cells.” Well, ‘better’ is relative to the function at hand. If biofilms were meant to generate electricity, the researchers at University of Bayreuth could boast. By combining a gel substance with the bacteria, the scientists got more electrical output than previous attempts with the bacteria alone.The following six papers are more technical for those interested.Bio-inspired Murray materials for mass transfer and activity (Nature Communications). Scientists build on nature’s hierarchical designs for applications needing to move mass. Why? “Natural systems and their hierarchical organization are not only optimized and designed for durability but also have the capability to adapt to their external environment, to undergo self-repair, and to perform many highly complex functions.”Reproducing the hierarchy of disorder for Morpho-inspired, broad-angle color reflection (Nature Scientific Reports). The brilliant blue Morpho butterfly returns to the biomimetics stage in the paper. Praise for the design gets mixed with long-age credulity in the opening sentences: “Intricate structures create structural colors that can remain brilliant after millions of years of fossilization. One of the most well-known examples is the butterflies of genus Morpho whose bright, blue wings grace many famous collections, and are reported to be visible even from low-flying aircrafts [sic].”Structural features and lipid binding domain of tubulin on biomimetic mitochondrial membranes (PNAS). Tubulin is not just a protein component of the cytoskeleton; it is also “a highly unexpected component of mitochondrial membranes involved in regulation of membrane permeability,” this paper says. The authors are studying its interaction with membrane proteins, knowing this will be “important for the structure-inspired design of tubulin-targeting agents.”A living mesoscopic cellular automaton made of skin scales (Nature). Theoretical cellular automata, famously conceived by John von Neumann, are realized in—of all things—lizard skin. Nature (that is, biology, not the journal) had it first. But does Nature‘s evolutionary reference compute?Here we show that in ocellated lizards a quasi-hexagonal lattice of skin scales, rather than individual chromatophore cells, establishes a green and black labyrinthine pattern of skin colour. We analysed time series of lizard scale colour dynamics over four years of their development and demonstrate that this pattern is produced by a cellular automaton (a grid of elements whose states are iterated according to a set of rules based on the states of neighbouring elements) that dynamically computes the colour states of individual mesoscopic skin scales to produce the corresponding macroscopic colour pattern. Using numerical simulations and mathematical derivation, we identify how a discrete von Neumann cellular automaton emerges from a continuous Turing reaction–diffusion system. Skin thickness variation generated by three-dimensional morphogenesis of skin scales causes the underlying reaction–diffusion dynamics to separate into microscopic and mesoscopic spatial scales, the latter generating a cellular automaton. Our study indicates that cellular automata are not merely abstract computational systems, but can directly correspond to processes generated by biological evolution.Biomimetic supercontainers for size-selective electrochemical sensing of molecular ions (Nature Scientific Reports). This paper describes how “the unique structure of spherical viruses” is  inspiring the construction of nano-containers for storage and sensing applications.Biomimetic catalytic transformation of toxic α-oxoaldehydes to high-value chiral α-hydroxythioesters using artificial glyoxalase I (Nature Communications). This paper describes attempts to mimic enzymes for maintaining handedness in pharmaceuticals. Once again, the authors tip the hat to Darwin: “Nature has evolved a wealth of proteins called enzymes that catalyse the chemical reactions necessary to sustain all life on Earth.” How nature “evolved” these capabilities is never explained.Show these articles to those who think Darwin owns science and intelligent design is religion. Nothing could be farther from the truth. If anything, the religion in these instances is Darwinism, taking it on faith that “nature” works miracles, achieving what our best scientists and engineers are struggling to imitate.Parents: get your kid a Science Fair award! Find a natural design he or she can imitate and learn about, coming up with a useful application. It will be sure to turn the judge’s heads. (Just don’t use the forbidden phrase “intelligent design” in a public school. We don’t want your kid to get Expelled.) Borrowing from nature is an age-old theme in science. Form and function go hand-in-hand in the natural world and the structures created by plants and animals are only rarely improved on by humans. If these designs are so good that intelligent minds want to mimic them, who can believe they emerged by chance?Falcon aircraft: With eyes like lasers, wings for speed, and talons for capture, a peregrine falcon swoops down unerringly for its prey at speeds approaching 200mph—even in high winds. No wonder Phys.org reports that “research work on how falcons fly is inspiring new technologies for aircraft that could contribute to their safety in the air, aerodynamics and fuel efficiency.” But even after over a century of flight design, human engineers probably won’t get close to the falcon’s abilities for another two decades. The article includes this infographic from BAE systems:The article ends with this remark by a specialist in air flow control in military aircraft: “Bio-inspiration is not a new concept; many technologies that we use every day are increasingly inspired by animals and nature.”Cheetah robot.  “University of Twente researcher Geert Folkertsma has developed a prototype cheetah robot,” Science Daily reports. “Folkertsma has dedicated four years of research and development to constructing a scaled-down robotic version of the fastest land animal in the world, with a view to replicating its movements.” To try to replicate the cat’s movements, the PhD student “studied extensive video footage of cheetahs,” the article says.Honeybee cleaners. The life of a honeybee seems like it would be a messy job: getting covered with pollen dust all the day long, even in the eyes. And yet they keep their hairs neat and clean. How? The spacing of the hairs seems to be a key, says Phys.org. The Bioneers at Georgia Tech are onto the case. They found that bees also come equipped with cleaning tools and the training to use them.“Bees have a preprogrammed cleaning routine that doesn’t vary,” said Marguerite Matherne, a Ph.D. student in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering. “Even if they’re not very dirty in the first place, bees always swipe their eyes a dozen times, six times per leg. The first swipe is the most efficient, and they never have to brush the same area of the eye twice.”A mechanical engineer at the school says, “Our findings may also be used to create mechanical designs that help keep micro and nanostructured surfaces clean.”Honeybee robot eyes: Speaking of honeybees, Science Daily says, “Honey bees have sharper eyesight than we thought.” They didn’t specify who “we” is, but they quickly inspire the reader with details about how scientists at the University of Adelaide are applying the new knowledge to the design of sharper eyes for robots. “Bees have much better vision than was previously known, offering new insights into the lives of honey bees, and new opportunities for translating this knowledge into fields such as robot vision, outlines a new study.”Fern batteries. Storing energy from solar cells is a major challenge. You can’t charge the cells at night, so how do you maintain the day’s energy collection? Scientists at RMIT University (Australia) are looking to Americans for answers – to American fern plants, that is – for “bio-inspired” answers to fast charging. The secret is in fractals: subdivisions of subdivisions of subdivisions in the leaves of the western swordfern. “Our electrode is based on these fractal shapes – which are self-replicating, like the mini structures within snowflakes – and we’ve used this naturally-efficient design to improve solar energy storage at a nano level,” they say. The fern-mimic electrode could “boost the capacity of existing integrable storage technologies by 3000 per cent. Watch for it in smartphones, laptops, cars, and buildings.Seaweed superconductors. Speaking of energy storage, ditch the graphite. Cease the lithium-ion pollution. There’s a greener way: use seaweed, say American scientists. Phys.org explains that when chelated, seaweed takes on an egg-box structure that magnifies the energy storage potential of batteries. “Testing showed that the seaweed-derived material had a large reversible capacity of 625 milliampere hours per gram (mAhg-1), which is considerably more than the 372 mAhg-1 capacity of traditional graphite anodes for lithium-ion batteries,” the article says. This could double the range of electric cars, while exploiting a cheap, renewable resource.Bat sonar. Echolocation in a certain species of bat seems to get enhanced when they wiggle their noses and ears. The evidence seems clear; bats have “extraordinary accuracy” at finding what they need in the dark. Virginia Tech engineers have taken notice, wondering if that could improve man-made sonar systems. The techs built a model with the new wiggle technique and found that it improved signal to noise by a factor of 100 to 1000. “Bat echolocation is one of nature’s remarkable achievements in navigation,” the article on Phys.org says, making this interesting admission: “That suggests that bolstering sensor capability by using a dynamic, mobile emitter and receiver should be translatable to engineered systems less complex than real bats, improving the navigation of autonomous drones and the accuracy of devices for speech recognition.”For Bat Appreciation Day (April 17), National Geographic posted “16 Incredible Pictures Show the Beauty of Bats.”Parsley scaffolds. Getting stem cells to grow where you want them is a challenge. Phys.org explains how some scientists are succeeding with plant materials. In the process, the scientists make a good statement about the value of living models:center_img (Visited 242 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Pint-sized Zuriel Oduwole sets her cap for success

first_imgFrom making documentaries about Africa to touring the world and interviewing global leaders, encouraging education for girls and starting on writing a book, Zuriel Oduwole has done a lot. But here’s the catch – she is only 12 years old. Zuriel Oduwole is a young documentary filmmaker who wants to change negative perceptions of Africa. (Image: Facebook) • Kumoodi: from Lagos to the world • Watch: Salif Keita and Black Mambazo call for harmony in Africa • Powerful women shape Africa • African entrepreneur sold his belongings to start Kisua • All about the African Union Priya Pitamber Most 12-year-olds are occupied with going to school and chilling with their friends; but Zuriel Oduwole stands out from this crowd. Her documentary filmmaking skills have led her to interview 14 heads of state and she has visited various countries where her documentaries have been screened.Zuriel’s father is Nigerian, and her mother is Mauritian, but she was born in California.Her passion lies with Africa, however, and the perception the rest of the world has of the continent.“I wanted to do it [film and documentaries] because there is power in media and also I wanted to show positive things of the African continent to the rest of the world because usually whenever they talk about Africa, they portray it as a continent of negative things,” she explains.“But because I lived in Africa for a period of time, I see a lot of positive things.” She introduces herself as a proud pan-African child, in the ninth grade at school. “I am working hard to do my school projects, play in my basketball league, and still do what I enjoy a lot – like my extracurricular activities of interviewing world leaders, making compelling documentaries, and inspiring girls around the world to dream bigger, much bigger.”A serendipitous startHer passion for making films was ignited in 2012 when she entered a documentary-making competition with The Ghana Revolution. “After this first foray into filmmaking, Zuriel was bitten by the director’s bug and quickly wanted to make more movies,” stated US news site CNN. “She turned to the web to find the tools she needed and got involved in the entire filmmaking process.”Quite a bit of training was needed to learn how to make a video. “My mum taught me how to use different software first, like how to edit things, how to add animations, how to put in fades, transitions and all those things but I am glad I had the time to learn it,” Zuriel said.Her second project, Educating and Healing Africa Out of Poverty, it looked at the formation of the African Union in 1963. Another interest, education, was examined in Technology in Educational Development. Her latest series, A Promising Africa, profiles five African countries, beginning with her father’s homeland, Nigeria. Zuriel has visited several countries to attend screenings of her documentaries, including South Africa. Sawubona !! South Africa Movie Premier this week. Hello everyone. My most busy week in my entire life. Arrived South… Posted by Zuriel Oduwole on Saturday, 21 March 2015Left Paris to Tokyo. Got spolit a lot. Showing my film here next week/ Educate A Girl 2 see what she can do. Thankful pic.twitter.com/JUwCReEsBc — Zuriel Oduwole (@ZurielOduwole) March 28, 2015“I’ve interviewed 14 heads of state and a few of those include the presidents of Tanzania, Liberia, Kenya, South Sudan, Nigeria and Cape Verde, to name a few,” she told CNN. “I’ve also been able to interview business leaders like my friend Mr Aliko Dangote.”The list of people interviewed by the 12-year-old is impressive: • Jerry John Rawlings (Ghana) • John Kufour (Ghana) • Joyce Banda (Malawi) • Jakaya Kikwete (Tanzania) • Rajkeswur Purryag (Mauritius) • Uhuru Kenyatta (Kenya) • Goodluck Johnathan (Nigeria) • Salva Kirr Mayardit (South Sudan) • Ellen Johnson Sirleaf (Liberia) • Jorge Fonseco (Cape Verde) • Portia Simpson Miller (Jamaica) • Thomas Thabane (Lesotho) • Ralph Gonsalves (St Vincent & Grenadines) • Denzil Douglas (St Kitts & Nevis) Education and empowermentThe importance of education is Zuriel’s other passion. She visits schools and gives talks on its value through her Dream Up, Speak Up, Stand Up programme. So far, she has reached 21 000 children in nine countries.“The reason I do it is because I want them to see that education is very important in life and I want to show them here is an example,” she said, pointing to herself, “and show them what they can do if they are educated, and if they are focused in life and have goals.”Not every girl was able to get an education or a chance to accomplish her dreams. “My vision is to see that this changes one day, and my mission is to use my Dream Up, Speak Up, Stand Up programme and other new ideas to inspire girls to accomplish this mission.”Speaking to CNN, she pointed out that in Africa, boys were the first to receive an education. “The boys go to school and get an education while the girls stay at home,” she explained, “And those girls aren’t educated and have fewer options in life when they get older.”In Accra Ghana 2day with kids at De Young school – Nima. We hung out, talked education and documentary. They are cool pic.twitter.com/u7TKKxQt6T — Zuriel Oduwole (@ZurielOduwole) March 26, 2015Varied interestsBesides filmmaking, Zuriel has a variety of hobbies, such as playing sport and reading. She is part of a basketball league, she plays soccer and is on the athletics team, and she does hip-hop dancing with her sisters.Reading helps her to improve her vocabulary. “I love reading National Geographic Kids Magazines,” she writes on her website. “I also love adventure and spy novels. I have started to write my own book which I hope to publish next year.”Global recognitionZuriel was the youngest recipient of the Governors Gold Medal Award and was featured in the American business magazine, Forbes, when she was 10 years old. The Canadian edition of the women’s magazine, Elle, put her on its list of 33 Women Who Changed The World in 2014.She has also appeared in numerous television interviews, including with BBC TV in London, CNBC Africa, and the SABC in Johannesburg.Premiered my film A Promising Africa in Johannesburg, Attended SAFTA, guest on CNBC, SABC Morning LIVE #LetGirlsLearn pic.twitter.com/O68D9ThEM3 — Zuriel Oduwole (@ZurielOduwole) March 21, 2015last_img read more

Apple wants you to pay big for their smart speaker

first_imgRelated Posts Cate Lawrence Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces As part of yesterday’s WorldWide Developer Conference (WWDC) Google launched their foray into home connectivity with the HomePad called by Apple CEO Tim Cook, “breakthrough home speaker with amazing sound and incredible intelligence that will reinvent home audio.”Don’t overlook the last word, in his statement, despite the desire some will have to group HomePad with voice activatedAmazon Echo and Google Home, the product really belongs in a separate category, and here’s why.It’s about sound, not just smarts The HomePod is a 7-inch tall smart speaker covered in a “seamless 3D mesh” fabric It contains a four-inch subwoofer According to Apple it ” uses an advanced algorithm that continuously analyzes the music and dynamically tunes the low frequencies for smooth, distortion‑free sound.” This includes “seven beamforming tweeters” that possess spatial awareness and direct the sound beams throughout the room. It automatically analyzes the acoustics, adjusting the sound based on the speaker’s location, and steers the music in the optimal direction. According to Tim Cook: “Just like with portable music, we want to reinvent home music.”If we position the product as a smart speaker (albeit voice activated) it’s a healthy competitor to the sound audio systems already manufactured by Sonos and Bose and sits in their price range.“ According to Philip Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of Worldwide Marketing:“Apple reinvented portable music with iPod and now HomePod will reinvent how we enjoy music wirelessly throughout our homes. HomePod packs powerful speaker technology, Siri intelligence and wireless access to the entire Apple Music library into a beautiful speaker that is less than 7 inches tall, can rock most any room with distortion-free music and be a helpful assistant around your home.” IYou can also link the device with other HomePods or speakers in the house that are AirPlay 2-compatible to get surround sound.It’s Apple-priceyWith Google Home retailing for $129 and Amazon Echo: $179, Apple’s HomePod is an outlier priced at $349, making it less compelling to those who either already own a smart home assistant or consider buying one in the future. Whilst many may have grown up with an iPod, iPhone or MacBook, affordability matters, and beyond this wedded to the cult of Mac, people won’t automatically turn to Apple when there are products like Alexa and Siri that are already enmeshed in popular culture. Even if you don’t own one, most people have seen the ads and know what they can do.See also: Apple’s HomeKit gets big upgrade at WWDC16HomePod is to be launched in December in the UK, US, and Australia, followed by more countries in 2018. Notably, Samsung subsidiary Harman International is intending to launch its own speaker this year in partnership with Microsoft.   The speaker will be controlled by Microsoft’s digital assistant Cortana and will enable a range of tasks including playing music, managing calendars and accessing news, similar to the functions possible on Amazon and Google’s devices. It’ll also come with Skype integration, allowing people to make phone calls to other Skype-enabled devices.  This growing trend makes it easy to envisage a connected home where voice activation matters more than a screen interface.This growing trend makes it easy to envisage a connected home where voice activation matters more than a screen interface. But in an era where people still compromise sound quality for convenience (who hasn’t listened to music on their phone for ease of access in public or even whilst sitting in bed?) Apple’s going to need a lot more than a fancy speaker to take down the successes already enjoyed by Amazon and Google Home. C’mon Apple, why don’t you really show us what Siri can do? Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… Tags:#Alexa#Amazon#Apple#Connected Devices#Cortana#Google Home#Home Automation#HomePod#Samsung#Siri#smart assistant#WWDC17 Follow the Puck Small Business Cybersecurity Threats and How to…last_img read more

Three militants killed in an encounter in Jammu and Kashmir’s Anantnag

first_imgSecurity forces killed three militants, including Tehreek-ul-Mujahideen Srinagar district commander Muhammad Ehsan Fazili alias Eesa, in Anantnag on Sunday night.Amid violent protests, the authorities placed parts of Srinagar and south Kashmir under security restrictions. Educational institutions were closed and exams cancelled. Train services were suspended.Police said, Fazili and two others were killed during a search operation.The police identified the second slain militant as Syed Owais, an affiliate of the Hizbul Mujahideen, and a resident of Kokernag. “The identify of the third is being ascertained,” the police said adding that arms and ammunition, including AK-47 rifles, pistols, hand grenades were recovered from the encounter site.Fazili, a student of Bachelor of Technology of Baba Ghulam Shah University, had joined the militants in September last year and “was involved in a recent attack on a police guard post at Soura, in which one police constable was killed”, said the spokesman.The policeman’s killing was also claimed by the Islamic State-affiliated news magazine ‘Amaq’, fuelling speculation about local militants’ links with the group.Violent protestsViolent protests broke out as hundreds of locals participated in the funeral prayers of Fazili and Owais in Srinagar and Kokernag.The protesters raised green and black flags. A few protesters unfurled the IS flags in the procession held for Fazili. They chanted pro-azadi and pro-militant slogans. Security forces used smoke shells to control the situation.Clashes spread in large parts of Srinagar. Several vehicles were damaged by the stone-throwing protesters. Most offices and business centres also remained closed.Top separatist leaders, including Syed Ali Geelani, Mirwaiz Umar Farooq and Yasin Malik, were placed under house arrest.last_img read more

U.P. govt. nod for reservation

first_imgThe Uttar Pradesh government on Friday approved 10% reservation for economically backward among upper castes in jobs and educational institutions. The nod was given at a meeting here of the State Cabinet presided over by Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath, senior Cabinet Minister and U.P. government spokesperson Shrikant Sharma told mediapersons. Third State to do soUttar Pradesh became the third State after Gujarat and Jharkhand to approve the legislation which has to be ratified by at least half the State Assemblies in the country. The Constitution (124 Amendment) Bill, 2019, providing for 10% reservation in jobs and educational institutions to the economically weaker sections in the general category was passed by Parliament in its recently concluded winter session. President Ram Nath Kovind has since given his assent to the Bill. “The Cabinet meeting presided over by Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath approved the notification granting 10% reservation to the poor among the upper castes which has come into effect on January 14,” Mr. Sharma said. “The U.P. government will implement the quota for the upper castes fully without touching the reservation for other sections of society,” he said.Meanwhile, a meeting between Deputy Chief Minister Dinesh Sharma, who holds the Higher Education portfolio, and State and private universities, approved a proposal for implementing the 10% reservation for upper caste poor in higher education institutions after the Cabinet approval.last_img read more

RRB Group D Exam 2018 begins tomorrow: Last minute tips and tricks

first_imgThe Railway Recruitment Board (RRB) Group D examination 2018 will begin tomorrow, September 17, 2018.All the candidates who will be appearing for the CEN 02/2018 (Level 1 posts or Group D as per 7th CPC) Computer Based Test (CBT) can check all the details here.The Railways Group D Exam 2018 is being held to fill in total 62,970 vacancies. Recently, the Railway Recruitment Board released an important notice regarding the exam date of the upcoming Group D examination 2018.Here are some important tips and tricks by Kiran Tomar, Exam Expert, Onlinetyari.com, to help you with your preparation for RRB Group D 2018 exam:Exam pattern: Note: The above pattern is for the first stage of examination, i.e. CBT or Computer Based Test only.Subject-wise strategy and important topics for preparation:1. MathematicsTo master this area, you need to combine skills with strategy. This section tests your ability to interpret and comprehend graphical data and then answer the questions that follow.It is essential that you need to have an idea of all the types of questions that are asked so that you can attempt them in the correct manner.Important topics: BODMAS, Percentage, Ratio and Proportion, Time and Work, Percentage, Compound Interest and Simple Interest, Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry.2. Reasoning abilityThe Reasoning Section, being a vast section, comprised of a number of topics. This section is considered both challenging and exciting part by most aspirants. The only way to excel in reasoning section is developing an in-depth understanding of logic and regular practice.advertisementImportant topics: Analogy, Classification, Blood Relation, Direction, Analytical, Reasoning, Syllogism, Statement Argument and Assumption.3. General science:The preparation for science and technology section is quite different. Piling up a huge stock of books and resources available in the market and cramming them is NOT a solution.Mostly, all of the questions from science and technology section are analytical/conceptual in nature.A lot of them hold relevance because of the events going on around us. So, current affairs across the world go in-sync with your conceptual knowledge. All you need here is the right approach.Important topics: Classification, Life Processes, Ecology, Sources of Energy, Reproduction, Acid Bases and Salts, Metals and Non-Metals, Chemical Reactions, Units and Measurement, Heat, Force, Electricity and Magnetism, Gravitation.4. General awarenessMost candidates are able to secure good marks in this section but there are a significant number of questions which candidates might find confusing. Watch current affair videos daily, read PDFs and newspapers and note down important points and revise them on a regular basis.Maximum questions in this section are generally asked from the topics on current affairs in science and technology, sports, culture, personalities, economics, politics and any other subject of importance.Read: 5 simple steps to check essential details of RRB Group D Exam 2018Eight quick tips to get a high score:Remember you are practicing to crack only the CBT or Computer Based Test. Therefore keep your focus clear and crisp.Learn from your mistakes each time you attempt a mock test.Try to avoid the same mistakes and try to understand by viewing the method or explanation for the correct answer.”The more the merrier”, is a quote apt in every stage of life, but most applicable during exam practice. The more you practice the less are the chances that you will make a mistake in the actual RRB Group D 2018 exam.Avoid stress while practicing. It is necessary to practice, but it is also necessary not to practice too much. If practicing is causing stress, then try to move back to learning and switch to another subject.Try to answer questions you know the answers to while you are practicing.Analyse your correct and wrongly attempted questions. Understand the reasons mentioned in the explanation or solutions.Decrease the time taken to attempt each mock test.Best of luck!Read: RRB releases Group C ALP, Technician answer key 2018, know how to raise objections hereAlso read: RRB releases link to repossess registration ID, check it herelast_img read more