Report: Swansea City 1 Burnley 0

first_imgKey Opta stats:- Swansea have won all three of their Premier League home games against Burnley; the only side they’ve faced more than once at the Liberty Stadium and have a 100 per cent record against in the competition.- Only Tottenham (15) have won more Premier League points than Swansea (14) since Carlos Carvalhal took charge of the Swans.- Ki Sung-yueng scored his first Premier League goal since May 2016 at West Ham, ending a run of 37 games without one in the competition.- Swansea have won their last three home games in the Premier League, after winning just two of their opening 11 this season. Swansea City 1 Burnley 0: Ki unlocks Clarets defence Alex Fisher Last updated 1 year ago 00:56 2/11/18 kisungyueng - cropped Getty Images Swansea City’s remarkable revival continued apace at the Liberty Stadium as Burnley were beaten 1-0 in the Premier League. Ki Sung-yueng kept Swansea City’s great escape going under Carlos Carvalhal with a decisive late strike in Saturday’s 1-0 victory over Burnley.The South Korea international produced the only moment of quality with nine minutes remaining at the Liberty Stadium, his low effort creeping past Nick Pope to extend Burnley’s winless run to 10 matches.Ki pounced on a loose ball on the edge of the area to seal all three points for Swansea, a win that sees them climb to 15th in the Premier League table – two points clear of the relegation zone on the back of a five-match unbeaten sequence. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player It was another disappointing day for Sean Dyche’s Clarets, though, who have not tasted victory since December 12, and they rarely looked like ending that run here.Half chances were the best they could muster, Lukasz Fabianski rarely called upon as Burnley’s attacking woes continued.The hosts were little better until Ki’s late strike, and the defeat leaves Burnley in seventh ahead of a two-week break due their elimination from the FA Cup.KIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!!!!!!!!!!! pic.twitter.com/W321InZDOe — Swansea City AFC (@SwansOfficial) February 10, 2018 Swansea’s 8-1 thrashing of Notts County in that competition on Tuesday offered hope of goals from the hosts, however a drab opening 45 minutes failed to deliver.Both Fabianski and Pope were mere spectators for much of the half as play got bogged down in the middle of the pitch.The one moment of quality came with 12 minutes on the clock as Sam Vokes latched onto Ashley Barnes’ knockdown, however the Wales international fired wide from 20 yards.Swansea offered very little in the attacking third and only fired one shot vaguely towards Pope’s goal before the interval, Sam Clucas’ effort sailing over the crossbar.Little changed after the restart with Barnes curling an effort wide of goal for the visitors, while Johann Gudmundsson finally brought a save out of Fabianski with a rising left-footed shot.Moments later Pope also got his gloves dirty dealing with Ki’s ambitious free-kick, the Burnley keeper having no problems dealing with the South Korean’s weak effort.Carvalhal introduced Andre Ayew and Tammy Abraham to try and snatch a late winner but it was Ki who secured a vital three points with his first of the season.last_img read more

15 days agoMan Utd to try again for Benfica defender Ruben Dias

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man Utd to try again for Benfica defender Ruben Diasby Paul Vegas15 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United are ready to try again for Benfica defender Ruben Dias.United may have to splurge up to £80million to prise the 22-year-old away from the Portuguese capital, says The Sun.They made moves for the Portugal international in the summer but missed out.Now with Benfica set to offer the centre-back improved terms, his release clause will rise dramatically from £60m.Benfica are desperate to keep hold of their star man and are believed to be willing to pay him big money in a new deal.But the lure of Manchester United could prove tough to resist for the player. last_img

Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive

first_imgNine-11 hours of sleep and no more than two hours of recreational screen time a day is what can save your children from becoming impulsive and make poorer decisions in life, find researchers. Impulsive behaviour is greatly linked to sleep and screen time, found Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group (HALO) at the CHEO Research Institute in Ottawa. “Impulsive behaviour is associated with numerous mental health and addiction problems, including eating disorders, behavioural addictions and substance abuse,” said Dr Michelle Guerrero, lead author from CHEO Research Institute and University of Ottawa. Also Read – An income drop can harm brainThe paper, published in the journal Pediatrics, analysed data for 4,524 children from the first set of data of a large longitudinal population study. In addition to sleep and screen time, the study also captured data related to physical activity – at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise daily. The ABCD study allowed Guerrero and her team to look at the three pillars of the movement guidelines against eight measures of impulsivity, such as one’s tendency to seek out thrilling experiences, to set desired goals, to respond sensitively to rewarding or unpleasant stimuli, and to act rashly in negative and positive moods.last_img read more

What The NFL Can Teach Congress About Hiring More Diverse Staffs

Related: Hot Takedown Even so, my findings suggest that a Rooney Rule-style policy could help increase the diversity of congressional staff hires, particularly if Congress has the means and the will to enforce it. In addition to his efforts to require his colleagues to interview at least one nonwhite candidate for any staff vacancy, then, Schumer should also consider urging them to make two further commitments — to provide a fair and equitable evaluation process for these candidates, and to publicly report the demographics of their staffers.3Perhaps he could even move beyond “urging” and build a bipartisan effort to formalize such a rule and its accompanying enforcement mechanisms. With this trio of policies in place, Congressional staffs might finally begin to match the diversity of the lawmakers they work for, and — more importantly — the people they represent.CORRECTION (March 15, 11:30 a.m.): An earlier version of the chart in this article incorrectly described the types of NFL coaches shown. The chart shows head coaches and coordinators, not head coaches and assistants. Although the new 115th Congress is the most racially diverse on record, its staff remains overwhelmingly white.1Exact numbers are difficult to come by, but according to a report by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, there were 336 top Senate staffers (chiefs of staff, legislative directors, communications directors, and staff directors) in December 2015, only 24 of whom were people of color: 12 Asian-Americans, 7 Latinos, 3 African-Americans, and 2 Native Americans. As The Washington Post recently reported, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) is trying to change that — and he’s using the NFL’s “Rooney Rule” as a model for addressing the imbalance.Established in 2003, the Rooney Rule requires NFL teams to interview at least one nonwhite candidate for any head coaching vacancy. It is an example of a “soft” affirmative action policy — that is, one that is designed to change the composition of the candidate pool, rather than change the criteria used in the hiring process. In this spirit, Schumer has urged his colleagues to ensure that at least one nonwhite applicant is considered for any open position. And if the NFL’s version is any guide, the policy should indeed help improve Congress’s hiring record.In a recent study I published in the American Law and Economics Review, I found that the NFL has hired notably more nonwhite head coaches in the years since the Rooney Rule went into effect. Of course, that increase could reflect the influence of other social, cultural or institutional changes, rather than the impact of the rule itself. So to account for this possibility, I compared the change in hiring trends among NFL head coaches (who became subject to the Rooney Rule) with the change in hiring trends among similar groups that were not affected by the policy, such as NFL coordinators and NCAA head coaches. Those comparison groups show us what the NFL might look like without the Rooney Rule, since they’re affected by the same hard-to-observe forces that may have influenced hiring decisions both before and after the Rooney Rule took effect.Using this technique, I found that a nonwhite candidate is about 20 percent more likely to fill an NFL head coaching vacancy during the Rooney era than before it, even after taking into account the general trend toward hiring more nonwhite candidates at all levels of coaching. In other words, the change can be traced directly to the Rooney Rule itself. Although there are plenty of differences between hiring congressional staffers and hiring NFL head coaches, the two processes share some similarities. Both are influenced by capacity constraints, meaning that NFL franchises and congressional offices can only interview a certain number of candidates because they are working under a limited hiring timeline. Additionally, there is a large amount of “noise” during the candidate-selection process in both fields, since there are no agreed-upon criteria for choosing candidates and it’s impossible to determine the true quality of a given candidate.2The Rooney Rule helps reduce this noise by requiring the franchise to take race into consideration when choosing candidates. These similarities suggest that a Rooney Rule-style policy may work in other organizations. (In fact, Facebook recently implemented its own version of the rule in certain departments, suggesting that the company has hopes for its ability to translate to another industry.)However, the Rooney Rule’s success is likely due in part to the fact that the NFL has been able to closely enforce it. For example, in 2003 the Detroit Lions’ then-president, Matt Millen, was fined $200,000 for failure to interview a nonwhite candidate for the team’s head-coaching vacancy. But when it comes to congressional staffing, there is currently no way for Schumer to force his colleagues to adopt and stick to a Rooney Rule-style hiring policy. The rule also cannot work unless nonwhite candidates are getting fair consideration and going through the same process as white candidates. The NFL has had to continually address teams’ temptation to fulfill the Rooney Rule’s requirements by conducting sham interviews instead of really searching for qualified nonwhite candidates. Finally, the hiring of an NFL head coach is a very public event that will be watched and commented on by reporters and fans alike, which helps maintain pressure to comply with the rule. Congressional offices, on the other hand, are not even required to publicly report the demographics of their staffs. So the positive effects of the Rooney Rule may not fully transfer to organizations that lack enforcement mechanisms. Hot Takedown’s March Madness Special read more

Intensity pervades Urban Meyers first preseason practice with Ohio State football

If the tenor set by Ohio State football coach Urban Meyer on the first day of preseason practice is any indication about what the coming season holds, the 2012 campaign will be an intense one. Meyer led veteran OSU players in an early-morning workout at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center that included stretching, running and drill work, according to an OSU release. Freshmen and upperclassmen walk-on players took part in their first fall practice under Meyer at 5:30 p.m. Friday. Meyer, who was hired Nov. 29, begins preparations for his first season with OSU after stints at Bowling Green, Utah and Florida. Meyer was not made available following his first-ever preseason practice at OSU, but sophomore cornerback Bradley Roby confirmed the arrival of a new era in OSU football from players’ perspectives when he said the morning session was more intense than what the team had experienced under former head coaches Jim Tressel and current OSU defensive coordinator Luke Fickell. “You can tell just by practice. It was totally different than coach Tressel,” Roby said. “Just the whole intensity of practice – It’s more urgent, more intensity. Not more competitive, but (coaches) stress the competitiveness so that brings out more.” Roby, who also called the Friday practice high-paced and crisp, said it was Meyer’s newly assembled coaching staff “being on you more” that brought the intense showing from players. Sophomore quarterback Braxton Miller, appearing less camera-shy and open to discussion with the media, said that his teammates came together during the summer. Miller, who rushed for 715 yard and seven touchdown while passing for 1,159 yards and 13 touchdowns during his freshman campaign, also credited the coaching staff for changes in his physique. “I feel a lot (different). My body’s changing, my attitude,” he said. “I had a talk with the coaches about, like, ‘how can I be a better leader?” In keeping with the theme of intensity, Miller also said he had some words of encouragement for his teammates before the early-morning practice. “Let’s go man,” Miller said. “We’re not here to lounge around.” New Season, New Numbers  Three players, including Roby, are wearing new numbers this fall.  Roby, who sported the No. 25 jersey last year, is wearing No. 1 for the 2012 season.  Additionally, senior linebacker Ross Oltorik is wearing the No. 20 jersey and freshman defensive lineman Se’von Pittman will sport the No. 95 jersey.  OSU begins its 2012 season Sept. 1 against Miami (Ohio) at Ohio Stadium. Kickoff, set for 29 days from Friday, is scheduled for noon.  Patrick Maks contributed to this story. read more

Commentary Lenzelle Smith Jr deserving of more recognition

Senior guard Lenzelle Smith Jr. (32) drives to the basket during a game against Delaware Dec. 18 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU won, 76-64.Credit: Mark Batke / For The LanternAaron Craft. LaQuinton Ross. Amir Williams.These are the names that come to mind first when most people think about the No. 3-ranked Ohio State men’s basketball team (15-0, 2-0).Someone that doesn’t often make the headlines is senior guard Lenzelle Smith Jr.Smith Jr., the team’s lone senior aside from Craft, has been huge for the Buckeyes all season.Currently second on the team in scoring with an average 12.7 points per game, and third on the team in both rebounding and assists with 4.9 and 1.6 respectively, Smith Jr. should be one of the stars of the team.And yet he is less talked about then certain bench players like athletic junior forward Sam Thompson and sophomore guard Amedeo Della Valle.The respect that Smith Jr. garners is not befitting of someone as vital as he is to the Buckeyes’ chances to success. He has scored in double figures in 11 of OSU’s 15 games this year, including a season high 20 in a 65-50 win against Wyoming Nov. 25.But perhaps Smith Jr.’s best performance of the season came when he was at his worst.Against Notre Dame Dec. 21, the Buckeyes were in danger of losing for the first time this season. Trailing by eight points with less than a minute remaining, OSU needed something to change to keep their unbeaten run alive.That change came in the form of Smith Jr.Failing to score up to that point in the game, Smith Jr. was struggling to make an impact. But in the final 50 seconds, he scored nine points and helped the Buckeyes go on a 14-3 run to win the game.Even though the final box score reads only nine points, Smith Jr.’s contribution was the difference in the final stretch.Players like Craft and Ross deserve their recognition, both are fantastic players, but the shadow they cast should not completely hide the work Smith Jr. has been doing for OSU.He is third on the team in minutes, just behind Craft and junior guard Shannon Scott, with an average of 27 a game. He is also third on the team in field goal percentage, behind only the teams two centers, and second in 3-point percentage.Although the season is not yet half over, the Buckeyes will need Smith Jr. to continue his stellar play if they hope to make another deep run in the NCAA tournament.Maybe then the senior guard not named Craft will be recognized by Buckeye fans for everything he has done. read more

New GST rates leave service providers worried

first_imgFinance Minister Arun Jaitley addresses a press conference after the first day of the GST Council meet in Srinagar on May 18, 2017.IANSIndia on Friday unveiled four rate bands under a new sales tax for services such as telecoms, insurance and restaurants, a move experts said could complicate compliance and leave businesses at the mercy of an intrusive tax bureaucracy.The Goods and Services Tax (GST), set to be launched from July 1, will have rates of 5, 12, 18 and 28 percent for services, in line with those applying to goods. It is a big departure from the current regime, where a single rate of 15 percent is applied on most services.The biggest argument in favour of the GST — India’s biggest tax overhaul since independence in 1947 — is that it would make it easier to do business by simplifying the tax structure and compliance.But the political challenges of striking a compromise between Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s central government and India’s federal states and territories has meant that life will get more, not less, complicated for many.For example, hotels and restaurant would be taxed on the basis of their room tariff and turnover of business. Air-conditioned restaurants will even be taxed at a higher rate under the new regime than those without.”For service providers, it is going to get troublesome,” said Saloni Roy, a senior director at tax consultancy Deloitte Haskins & Sells LLP.MULTIPLE RATESSince services account for more than half of India’s $2 trillion economy, the complexities run the risk of derailing the sector’s growth and even slowing Asia’s third-largest economy.The government, however, defended the move, saying different economic classes can’t be taxed at the same rate.Finance Minister Arun Jaitley also played down concerns that higher headline rates would inflate the tax burden on consumers. Since service providers will get tax input credits, he said, the effective tax rate will be lower.”The actual incidence on consumers will go down,” Jaitley told reporters after a two-day meeting with his counterparts from Indian states.Under the new regime, while healthcare and education services will be tax exempt, services offered at five-star hotels will be taxed at 28 percent.Telecoms and financial services will be taxed at a standard rate of 18 percent. An industry group representing mobile operators said this would further bleed a sector still smarting from a price war triggered by the aggressive market entry of billionaire Mukesh Ambani’s Reliance Jio.”This is likely to slow down the planned rollout of infrastructure,” Rajan S. Mathews, director general of the Cellular Operators Association of India.A NEW INSPECTOR RAJ?The long-awaited GST will replace a slew of federal and state levies, seeking to transform a country of 1.3 billion population into a single market.The measure has also been touted as the biggest reform undertaken by Modi to transform the South Asian nation into a business friendly destination.While it will make lives easier for manufacturers and traders as “cascading” taxes on top of taxes through the production process would be done away with, compliance for service providers would become onerous.In place of a single registration, they will be required to register in every state where they do business.There is also a risk of overzealous tax inspectors becoming more intrusive as the GST has an “anti-profiteering” provision to ensure companies pass on the benefit of input tax credits to consumers.Roy of Deloitte said implementing the provision is fraught with risks as its empowers tax authorities to ask for pre- and post-GST cost sheets from companies of their products.”It can lead to the Inspector Raj,” she warned.last_img read more

Italy motorway bridge collapses dozens feared dead

first_imgThe collapsed Morandi Bridge is seen in the Italian port city of Genoa on 14 August 2018. — Photo: ReutersA motorway bridge collapsed on Tuesday over the northern Italian port city of Genoa, killing dozens of people according to the local ambulance service, in what the transport minister said was likely to be “an immense tragedy”.The local fire brigade said the bridge collapsed at around 11:30 a.m. (0930 GMT) during torrential rainfall. Television showed images of the collapsed section of the bridge, built on the A10 toll motorway in the 1960s.The head of the ambulance service said there were “dozens of dead”, according to Italian news agency Adnkronos. At least 10 people were killed and 20 vehicles were involved, local police sources said.An ambulance official told Reuters the service could only confirm two injured people so far, “but we suppose there are unfortunately a lot of dead.”Restructuring work on the bridge was carried out in 2016. The highway operator said work to shore up the foundation of the bridge was being carried out at the time of the collapse, adding that the bridge was constantly monitored.The elevated road crumbled over a river, railroad tracks and buildings. The highway is a major artery to the Italian Riviera and to France’s southern coast. Train services around Genoa have been halted.A witness told Sky Italia television he saw “eight or nine” vehicles on the bridge when it collapsed in what he said was an “apocalyptic scene”.Transport minister Danilo Toninelli said in a tweet that he was “following with great apprehension what seems like an immense tragedy”.Shares in Atlantia, the toll road operator which runs the motorway, were suspended after falling 6.3 per cent after news of the collapse.last_img read more

Nearly 28pc babies born with low birthweight in Bangladesh

first_imgMap showing rate of babies born weighing less than 2.5 kilos, according to a Lancet study. Illustration: AFPMore than 20 million newborns in 2015 — one in seven — came into the world weighing too little, according to a global assessment of birthweight, published Thursday.|Over 90 per cent of babies tipping the scale at less than 2.5 kilos (5.5 pounds) when born were in low- and middle-income countries, researchers reported in The Lancet Global Health.Worldwide, just under 15 per cent of 2015 newborns in the 148 countries canvassed had low birthweight, varying between 2.4 per cent in Sweden and nearly 28 percent in Bangladesh.That’s down from a global average of 17.5 per cent in 2000.But meeting the World Health Organization target of cutting low birthweight 30 per cent between 2012 and 2025 “will require more than doubling the pace of progress,” said lead author Hannah Blencowe, a professor at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.In sub-Saharan Africa, the number of low birthweight live births actually increased from 2000 to 2015, from 4.4 to 5 million.Southern Asia is estimated to have had 9.8 million in 2015, nearly half the world total.Weighing less than 2.5 kilos at birth is closely linked to high rates of neonatal mortality and ill health later in life: more than 80 percent of the world’s 2.5 newborns who die every year are low birthweight.Underweight newborns who survive also have a greater risk of stunting as well as developmental and health problems, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease.”National governments are doing too little to reduce low birthweight,” Blencowe said in a statement.Undernourished mothers”To meet the global nutrition target of a 30 percent reduction by 2025 will require more than doubling the pace of progress.”The reasons for low birthweight are very different in poor and rich regions.In South Asia and parts of sub-Saharan Africa, a large percentage of underweight babies are born at term but are stunted because their mothers were undernourished.In North America and Europe, a higher share of low birthweight babies are preemies.Adolescent pregnancies, a high prevalence of infection, high levels of fertility treatment, and a high rate of caesarean sections — especially in the United States and Brazil — can all be factors, the study found.An international team of researchers analysed national government databases to estimate the prevalence of low birthweight in 148 nations from 2000 to 2015.Overall, the study took into account 281 million births. Several countries — including India — were not included for lack of data.”Every newborn must be weighed, yet worldwide we don’t have a record for the birthweight of nearly one third of all newborns,” said co-author Julia Krasevec, a statistics and monitoring specialist at UNICEF.Besides Sweden, other countries with relatively few low birthweight babies included Finland (4.1 per cent), Iceland (4.2) Serbia (4.5), Norway (4.5), Albania (4.6), China (5), Croatia (5.1) and Cuba (5.3).Many large advanced economies fell in the 6-8 percent range, including France, the United States, Britain and Germany, Mexico and Brazil.Five countries, including Bangladesh, had low birthweight rates above 20 percent: Comoros, Guinea-Bissau, Nepal, and the Philippines.last_img read more

Pscholka receives AG Award from MSU Extension

first_imgState Rep. Al Pscholka (LEFT), R-Stevensville, is pictured with MSU Extension director Tom Coon. Pscholka was honored by Michigan State University Extension with its Key Partner Award for 2013. Pscholka received the award this week at the group’s annual conference at the Kellogg Center in Lansing.State Rep. Al Pscholka, R-Stevensville, was honored by Michigan State University Extension with its Key Partner Award for 2013.  Pscholka received the award this week at the group’s annual conference at the Kellogg Center in Lansing.“During development of the budget for 2014, Representative Pscholka made sure that Extension services and agricultural research were given the same consideration as the rest of higher education,” said Tom Coon, director of MSU Extension.“Representative Pscholka in hearings and testimony discussed the importance of agricultural research and Extension to growers in his district.  He made sure funding was strengthened to make sure the needs of farmers and agricultural consumers were met,” Coon said.  “Leaders like Representative Pscholka, who remember our programs at critical times, help to ensure we’ll be positioned to continue serving the needs of Michigan’s food and agricultural industries well into the future.”Pscholka, chairman of Higher Education Appropriations Subcommittee, said “Research and the Extension are important to the quality of life in Southwest Michigan.  Agriculture not only has a huge impact on our economy, it is part of our heritage,” Pscholka said.  “The services provided by MSU research and Extension are invaluable to our local growers who depend on top notch research, science, and services.”Pscholka was nominated earlier this year by an employee of MSU Extension.“I look forward to working on policies that will help agriculture grow and prosper in our corner of Michigan and across the state,” Pscholka said.-30- Categories: News 23Oct Pscholka receives AG Award from MSU Extensionlast_img read more

I have a far more reasonable number of stories tod

first_img I have a far more reasonable number of stories today—and I’m sure you’re happy about that.  I know I am. JPMorgan’s short market corners of 20% in COMEX gold and 35% in COMEX silver of a year ago—and the bank’s 21% long market corner in COMEX gold currently—meet or exceed the market shares held in the previous manipulations. On that basis alone, the CFTC should be prosecuting JPMorgan today. The Sumitomo copper trader who manipulated the market was known as “Mr. 5%” for his share of the market. Shouldn’t JPMorgan be referred to as Mr. 20% or Mr. 35%? – Silver analyst Ted Butler: 08 February 2014 Despite the fact that gold and silver finished in the plus column again yesterday, it was obvious that all four precious metals ran into sellers of last resort at 11 a.m. Hong Kong time—and then again between 8 and 9:15 a.m. in New York.  This isn’t rocket science, as all one has to do is give a cursory glance at all four precious metal charts posted at the top of this column—as the chart data speaks for itself. But it was another amazing day for the precious metal equities.  I must admit that I was taken aback by the strong showing yesterday, the third day in a row of big gains on less-than-impressive price performance—especially in silver.  From it’s low of last Thursday, the HUI has gained a bit over 10%.  Here’s the 5-day chart. Sponsor Advertisement Looking at the 3-year HUI chart, you can see that the last three days of gains have put the RSI trace very close to the overbought level, which is a situation that hasn’t existed since back in September 2012.  And it’s also self-evident, that we have miles to go to get back to anywhere near where the precious metal stocks were trading in 2011. Platinum and palladium had similar days, with the outstanding feature being the same engineered price decline as gold and silver—and during precisely the same times.  Nothing free market about these, either.  Here are the charts. Nothing happens to precious metal prices without their consent The gold price opened flat in New York on Monday evening, but around 8:30 a.m. Hong Kong time a rally began that got capped at 11 a.m. Hong Kong time right on the button.  From there it chopped sideways—and volume was pretty heavy by the time I hit the send button on yesterday’s column at 5:30 a.m. EST, which was 10:30 a.m. in London. Then shortly before 1 p.m. GMT, the gold price rallied a few dollars—and at 1 p.m. GMT the gold price, along with the other three precious metals, got sold off in unison, with the low tick in all four coming at 9:15 a.m. EST in New York.  The subsequent rally in gold topped out/got capped shortly after 11:30 a.m. in New York—and the price traded flat for the remainder of the day. The CME Group recorded the low and high ticks at $1,273.50 and $1,294.40 in the April contract. Gold closed the Tuesday session at $1,290.90 spot, up $15.90 on the day.  Volume, net of February and March, was very decent at 161, 000 contracts. [Note: You may notice that there is a discrepancy in the daily percentage gains between the Intraday Silver Sentiment Index chart—and the Long-Term Intraday Silver 7 Index chart posted above.  Nick uses two different data sets to produce each chart.  The intraday data comes from Yahoo quotes—and is computed from that.  The info on the second chart is taken from the end-of-day open, high, low, and closing data, which is not always the same.  “So the intraday data is always just a whisker off.“—as Nick puts it. – Ed] The CME’s Daily Delivery Report for Tuesday showed that 36 gold and 1 lonely silver contract were posted for delivery tomorrow within the Comex-approved depositories.  Canada’s Bank of Nova Scotia, HSBC USA and Barclays were the largest movers and shakers in what little delivery action there was.  The link to yesterday’s Issuers and Stoppers Report is here. There were deposits in both GLD and SLV yesterday.  In GLD, an authorized participant added 57,839 troy ounces of gold—and in SLV, there were 1,442,970 troy ounces added, which was within a hundred ounces of what was withdrawn from that ETF last Friday. The good folks over at the shortsqueeze.com Internet site updated their short positions for both GLD and SLV [as of January 31] late yesterday evening EST—and here’s what they had to report.  The short position in SLV fell by a very decent 15.50% —and is now down to 16.47 million ounces/shares held short, or 512 tonnes of the stuff. But the drop in GLD was a shocker, as the short position there fell by a very chunky 29.15% —and is now down to 12.54 million shares, or 1.254 million troy ounces, or 37 metric tonnes. These are very impressive numbers—and I know that Ted Butler will be a happy camper when he sees them this morning—and will certainly have something to say about it in his mid-week commentary to his paying subscribers later today.  The fact that the short positions in both these ETFs declined so significantly in the face of flat gold prices and falling silver prices during the 2-week reporting period, is very bullish. The U.S. Mint had another sales report yesterday.  They sold 1,000 troy ounces of gold eagles—500 one-ounce 24K gold buffaloes—and 249,500 silver eagles. Over at the Comex-approved depositories, they didn’t receive any gold, but did ship out 26,858 troy ounces—all of it from Scotia Mocatta’s warehouse.  The link to that activity is here. In silver, they reported receiving 277,845 troy ounces—and shipped out 7,000 ounces of the stuff.  Most of the receipts went into Scotia Mocatta’s vault.  The link to that action is here. Here’s a chart that Nick Laird sent around late yesterday evening MST—and it doesn’t require any further explanation from me, or anyone else for that matter. Reader ‘h c’ asked me to send him an updated version of the long-term Silver 7 chart, which I did— and it’s something I haven’t posted in this column for more than a year, as it was so ugly to look at.  It’s still not a thing of beauty, but we can only hope that the worst is behind us. With some minor variations, the silver price action followed the same path as gold, complete with the 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m. EST sell-off that the other three precious metals experienced. The low and high ticks were reported as $19.915 and $20.29 in the March contract. Silver finished on Tuesday at $20.24 spot, up 16.5 cents from Monday’s close.  Net volume was 39,000 contracts. The metals themselves [gold and silver] are still some distance from overbought level themselves, so it will be interesting to see how things develop [or are allowed to develop] in the days and weeks ahead. I’d sure like to think that the worst is over.  I know that the Commitment of Traders Report is screaming that a bottom is in—and Ted Butler has been expecting the precious metals to fly. But, as Ted always points out—and rightfully so—how far and fast we go to the upside is 100% dependent on what JPMorgan et al do in the current rally.  Will they stand by and “let ‘er rip” to the upside—or will it be the same old, same old—as I said in my column yesterday. They have obviously been around every trading day so far this week—and have stepped in where they felt it necessary, but that still doesn’t alter the fact that we could still move sharply higher from here if that is what they have decided to let happen, or have been instructed to do. Of course, I’m cheering for “let ‘er rip”—but constantly aware that nothing happens to precious metal prices without their consent.  This time is no different. As I also mentioned in this space yesterday, the cut-off for this Friday’s Commitment of Traders Report was at the 1:30 p.m. EST close of Comex trading on Tuesday.  I was not overly happy to see such big volume on such small price moves in both metals yesterday.  But that is tempered by the fact that the 75 minute sell-off in all four precious metals added to the volume considerably as “da boyz” turned on the technical funds for that brief period. I’m also mindful of the fact that, despite the price action, the numbers in last week’s COT Report were a big surprise, especially in silver—and despite the price action of the last three days, I’m not going to attempt to second guess what might be in this Friday’s report.  On the surface it may be the same old thing—but it’s what’s going on out of sight under the hood that I’ll be interested in—and I’ll get that all from Ted on Friday afternoon. In the Far East on their Wednesday, both gold and silver got sold down a bit in the first hour of trading—and haven’t recovered back above their Tuesday closing prices now that London has been open about 25 minutes.  Volumes are very light for this time of day—and down well over 50% from where they were this time yesterday.  JPMorgan et al didn’t have to put out any precious metal price fires in the Far East today, so that’s the entire reason why volumes have shrivelled up.  The dollar index isn’t doing anything. And as I hit the send button on today’s missive at 5:10 a.m. EST, the precious metals aren’t doing anything, although volumes have picked up quite a bit, especially in gold—and the volumes in both metals are all of the HFT variety.  The dollar index is still chopping sideways. As for what might happen during the remainder of the trading day today—I haven’t a clue, and won’t hazard a guess. I hope your day goes well—and I’ll see you here tomorrow. The dollar index close in New York late on Monday afternoon at 80.64—and by the 8:20 a.m. Comex open, it was down to 80.46.  After rallying back to 80.65 by 9:10 a.m. EST, it fell back to 80.46 shortly before 11 a.m.—and by the 1:30 p.m. Comex close it was back to basically unchanged on the day.  The index closed at 80.62—down 2 basis point. Uranium Energy Corp. (NYSE MKT: UEC) is pleased to announce that the final authorization has been granted for production at its Goliad ISR Project in South Texas.  As announced in previous press releases, the Company received all of the required authorizations from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, including an Aquifer Exemption which has now been granted concurrence from EPA Region 6. Amir Adnani, President and CEO, stated, “We are very pleased to have received this final authorization for initiating production at Goliad. Our geological and engineering teams have worked diligently toward achieving this major milestone and are to be truly commended. We are grateful to the EPA for its thorough reviews and for issuing this final concurrence. The Company’s near-term plan is to complete construction at the first production area at Goliad and to greatly increase the throughput of uranium at our centralized Hobson processing plant.” Please contact Investor Relations with questions or to request additional information, info@uraniumenergy.com. The gold stocks gapped up about a percent at the open—and then rallied to their highs of the day just a few minutes before noon in New York.  After that they chopped sideways, giving up a point or so going into the close.  The HUI still managed to finish up a healthy 4.20%. The silver equities more or less followed the same path as the gold shares, with the high tick of the day coming at precisely noon EST—and Nick Laird’s Intraday Silver Sentiment Index closed up 3.82%.last_img read more

Government health agencies have spent more than tw

first_imgGovernment health agencies have spent more than two decades shying away from gun violence research, but some say the new spending bill, signed by President Trump on Friday, will change that.That is because, in agency instructions that accompany the bill, there is a sentence noting that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has the authority to conduct research on the causes of gun violence.”I think this is a huge victory for our country and our communities and our children. This is one step in many to help stop gun violence in this country,” says Rep. Stephanie Murphy, a Democrat from the Orlando, Fla., area, where a mass shooting left 49 dead at a gay nightclub in 2016. But researchers who study gun violence are unimpressed.”There’s no funding. There’s no agreement to provide funding. There isn’t even encouragement. No big questions get answered, and there’s nothing here, yet, of significance for the research community,” says Dr. Garen Wintemute, a well-known expert on gun violence and a professor of emergency medicine at the University of California, Davis.”I’m not particularly optimistic that anything will change,” says Daniel Webster, a researcher at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.The CDC has been willing to look at noncontroversial activities, such as the effect of mediating disputes between gangs, says Webster, “but the CDC has not, and I don’t believe they will examine other kinds of interventions or other kinds of solutions to the problem.”That is because, back in 1996, Congress passed something called the Dickey Amendment. It said that none of the funds given to the CDC for injury prevention could be used to advocate for or promote gun control. The law came along with a cut in funding that delivered a powerful message: Pursue research on hot-button questions about guns and face the wrath of lawmakers who control the agency’s funding.”At a time when we were just beginning to do good science around how to protect ourselves and better understand the risk and the benefit from owning and using firearms, language was put on the federal budget which had a chilling effect and, in effect, stopped research dead in its tracks,” says Dr. Georges Benjamin, who is the executive director of the American Public Health Association.Jay Dickey, the Arkansas Republican and former lawmaker whom the federal amendment is named for, later told NPR that he regretted it. “It wasn’t necessary that all research stop,” Dickey explained. “It just couldn’t be the collection of data so that they can advocate gun control. That’s all we were talking about. But for some reason, it just stopped altogether.”Recent mass shootings have forced government officials to address the lack of research funding. Alex Azar, the secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, spoke to lawmakers on Capitol Hill in February, the day after a shooting at a Parkland Fla., school left 17 people dead. When asked about the Dickey Amendment, he said his understanding was that it “does not in any way impede our ability to conduct our research mission. It is simply about advocacy.”Rep. Kathy Castor, a Democrat from Florida, pressed him on whether he would instruct the agencies he leads to do gun research. “We certainly will,” Azar answered. “Our Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — we’re in the science business and the evidence-generating business, and so I will have our agency certainly be working in this field.”As mild as those remarks were, they made headlines. And the language in the government spending bill explicitly refers to those comments: “While appropriations language prohibits the CDC and other agencies from using appropriated funding to advocate or promote gun control, the Secretary of Health and Human Services has stated the CDC has the authority to conduct research on the causes of gun violence.”Webster worries that rather than freeing up the CDC to fund more research on gun violence, this new language might do the opposite, by seeming to limit CDC funding to examining the “causes” of gun violence.”Before, it didn’t restrict it to the ’causes,’ ” notes Webster. In his view, this spending bill “certainly doesn’t add anything new that is good.”In an ideal world, Congress would have done something much bolder, says Georges Benjamin. “I would have preferred the Dickey language to be removed — strong language that says, ‘Yes, research is permissible,’ and money,” Benjamin says. “We didn’t get those three things.”But he does believe that the intent of the budget language was to make research more permissible and that public health agencies should be able to find some money in the funding they’re due to receive from the new budget to move firearms research forward. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

Even in the middle of the day in middle of the we

first_imgEven in the middle of the day, in middle of the week, the theater was completely packed.Hundreds had come to watch Rafiki, a movie about two young Kenyan women who are full of life, joy and wonder. Kena is a great student; she plays football and hangs out with the guys. And Ziki is the free spirit — cotton candy dreads and a smile full of mischief.At one point, inside an abandoned van, the two realize they’ve fallen for each other. They touch, they look in each others’ eyes. At the theater, you could almost hear the audience holding its breath — and as their lips touched, there was applause.Over the past week, there has been a small revolution happening across movie screens in Kenya. For the first time, a same-sex love story is playing on the big screen, sparking conversations about freedom of expression, the constitution and finally feeling heard.After the movie, the theater lobby is buzzing. Alex Teyie, 25, is sitting with a group of friends, discussing what just happened.”It’s like, a queer movie in Nairobi in 2018,” she says. “That’s just fantastic to see.”Rafiki is a milestone here, where gay sex is illegal. A few years ago, the film Stories of Our Lives, which profiles several LGBT Kenyans, was banned. It was so controversial that some of the filmmakers feared retaliation and legal consequences. So for a long time, they remained anonymous.The Kenya Film Classification Board used many of the same arguments to ban Rafiki. In a letter banning the film, Ezekiel Mutua, the outspoken and controversial head of the KFCB, said the film “undermined the sensibilities” of Kenyans.”Rafiki contains homosexual scenes that are against the law, the culture and moral values of the Kenyan people,” Mutua said in a statement in April. “The film seeks to overtly promote lesbianism.”The film’s director, Wanuri Kahiu, sued the KFCB saying the ban was not only an affront to her constitutional rights but would also keep the movie from being considered for the Oscars. One of the requirements for a nomination is that a movie is screened at least seven days in its home country. While deciding on the merits of the case, Kenya’s high court issued a temporary injunction, allowing Rafiki to be screened for seven days, from September 23 to 29. Teyie’s friend, Valary Mumbo, says the ruling is bittersweet. She wishes the film were playing for months so Kenyans in other cities and villages could watch it. But she can’t help but feel glee that two theaters were jam-packed on a weekday.”It’s really good to see that Kenyans are waking up,” she says. “Yeah, they’re good. They are woke.”Over the phone from Los Angeles, Kahiu says they had “won the battle, but we have to continue with the war.” Rafiki was the first Kenyan movie to screen at the Cannes Film Festival in France and she says she was heartbroken when it was banned at home.”The case has become larger than the film, because the case is not about Rafiki,” she says. “The case is about freedom of expression.”In a lot of ways, this is just one instance in which Kenya is coming to terms with one of the most liberal constitutions on the African continent. Courts are currently weighing cases about separation of powers; they are hearing challenges to the country’s anti-sodomy laws. And here, the court is going to decide whether Kahiu has the right to tell a love story that challenges some of the country’s conservative moorings.In a statement, the film classification board called the temporary halt on its ban “a sad moment and a great insult.”Kahiu says she is simply a filmmaker who wants to tell a love story with authentic characters. She says she just wanted to show the beauty and heartbreak that ensues when two black LGBT characters follow their heart.”That was the point, that it doesn’t matter who you are, love is love and that is an absolute universal, basic language,” she says. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

Research published in a major medical journal conc

first_imgResearch published in a major medical journal concludes that a parachute is no more effective than an empty backpack at protecting you from harm if you have to jump from an aircraft. But before you leap to any rash conclusions, you had better hear the whole story.The gold standard for medical research is a study that randomly assigns volunteers to try an intervention or to go without one and be part of a control group. For some reason, nobody has ever done a randomized controlled trial of parachutes. In fact, medical researchers often use the parachute example when they argue they don’t need to do a study because they’re so sure they already know something works.Cardiologist Robert Yeh, an associate professor at Harvard Medical School and attending physician at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, got a wicked idea one day. He and his colleagues would actually attempt the parachute study to make a few choice points about the potential pitfalls of research shortcuts. They started by talking to their seatmates on airliners.”We’d strike up a conversation and say, ‘Would you be willing to be randomized in a study where you had a 50 percent chance of jumping out of this airplane with — versus without — a parachute?’ ” Yeh says.Only a few people said yes to this outrageous invitation, and they were excluded for reasons of questionable mental health.The scientists had much better success asking members of their own research teams from Harvard, University of California, Los Angeles (Where Yeh’s brother is a surgery professor), and University of Michigan (where a buddy works) about volunteering to participate in the experiment on other aircraft.In all, 23 people agreed to be randomly given either a backpack or a parachute and then to jump from a biplane on Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts or from a helicopter in Michigan. Relying on two locations and only two kinds of aircraft gave the researchers quite a skewed sample. But this sort of problem crops up frequently in studies, which was part of the point Yeh and his team were trying to make.Still, photos taken during the experiment show the volunteers were only too happy to take part. “I think people are laughing all of the way to the ground,” Yeh says.Oh, there’s one important detail here. The drop in the study was about 2 feet total, because the biplane and helicopter were parked.Nobody suffered any injuries. Surprise, surprise. So it’s technically true that parachutes offered no better protection for these jumpers than the backpacks.”But, of course, that is a ludicrous result,” Yeh says. “The real answer is that that trial did not show a benefit because of the types of patients who were enrolled.” If they had enrolled people at high risk for injury, that is people in flying aircraft, the results would have been quite different (not to mention unethical). But something like this happens in everyday medical research. It’s far too easy for scientists who have already anticipated the outcome of their research to cherry-pick patients and circumstances to achieve the results they expect to see. This research paper carried that idea to the ridiculous extreme.The study’s findings were published in the traditionally lighthearted Christmas issue of the medical journal, BMJ.”It’s a little bit of a parable, to say we have to look at the fine print, we have to understand the context in which research is designed and conducted to really properly interpret the results,” Yeh says. Scientists often read just the conclusion of a study and then draw their own conclusions that are far more sweeping than are justified by the actual findings.This is a real problem in science.”I know that people often don’t look detailed enough into what is being investigated to know how to interpret the results of a trial,” says Cecile Janssens, an epidemiology professor at Emory University.Janssens was delighted to come across the paper on Twitter. She says like a lot of research, its results are accurate as far as they go, but “the results can only be generalized to situations where people jump out of an aircraft within a few feet above the ground.”She plans to give this paper to her students with a straight face and see how long it takes for them to get the deeper points about scientific methodology buried in this absurd experiment.”It will be unforgettable,” she says — far better than assigning a straight-ahead scientific study.Yeh is pleased to see that the fun he had with his colleagues is turning into a teaching tool. He also savors some of the more subtle lessons buried in the paper. For example, the scientists attempted to submit it to a government registry of research studies, which is required for many studies involving human subjects. They chose one in Sri Lanka to reduce the risk that it would be discovered in advance, spoiling the joke. It was rejected.”They thought that a trial conducted in this manner could not lead to scientifically valid evidence,” he said.”They’re right!” he adds with a laugh.In fact, the paper acknowledges that the research team members cracked themselves up so much that “all authors suffered substantial abdominal discomfort from laughter.””Our greatest accomplishment from all of this was we felt very good that we were able to cite Sir Isaac Newton in the paper,” he says. They referred to Newton’s classic 1687 paper establishing the law of gravity.Yes, gravity is a law. Mess with it at your own risk.You can reach NPR science correspondent Richard Harris by email: rharris@npr.org. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

Survey Finds Potheads Will Spend Freely on 420 and Might Go to

first_img It’s hard to overstate the economic opportunity created by legalized marijuana. Just in California, where recreational cannabis sales began Jan. 1, sales are expected to hit $3.7 billion this year. As more dispensaries open, that figure is projected to hit $5.1 billion in 2019. For comparison, beer sales in the Golden State were $5 billion in 2017.The ripple effects of legal marijuana sales are widespread. States that allow recreational cannabis are raking in millions in taxes and will do so annually forever more. Wherever dispensaries are legal the real estate market becomes ultracompetitive. Not least, legal marijuana businesses are on a hiring binge, employing everyone from scientists to cashiers.Related: California Unleashes a Massive Market for Legal CannabisMarijuana has become big business in the United States, and the biggest day for the industry is April 20, commonly referred to as “4/20.” Started in the early 1970s by a group of stoners, 4/20 has become the defacto national holiday for marijuana users across the U.S. Consumers of cannabis celebrate the day by attending parades, eating a ton of junk food and, of course, smoking some of the stuff.Related: Here’s How April 20 Became the 4/20 of Global Cannabis SignificanceMy company, LendEDU, surveyed 1,000 adult Americans who intend to smoke some weed this Friday. We found they will spend an average of $146.12. Perhaps unexpectedly, 55.44 percent of respondents have 4/20 related expenses in their monthly budget. Of that $146.12 about half — $71.35 — will be spent on the drug itself, whether flower, vape products, edibles or any other product that will get you groovy. Further, $40.34 of the 4/20 budget will be spent on “munchies.” (Acute hunger is a common side-effect of cannabis consumption). Finally, $34.43 will be used for new marijuana paraphernalia, which could include a bong or a new vaporizer, purchased especially for use this Friday.How will these folks have time to celebrate a holiday that involves drug-intake on a workday? We asked. Right off the bat, 22.48 percent of the poll participants are not employed, so it’s not a concern for them. What’s more interesting is that slightly more than one in three (35.66 percent) planning on smoking some pot this Friday will be skipping work on April 20 and the remaining 41.86 percent of survey-takers will go to work. However, of those 20 percent indicated they will be arriving to the office under the influence of marijuana and 10.26 percent are undecided if they will be walking into work high.Of those who intend to get to the office feeling a bit giddy, confidence in their abilities is sky high (pardon the pun). Most (78.95 percent) said that their workplace productivity stoned on April 20 will still be between 80 percent and 100 percent of normal (we’re presuming they aren’t stoned at work on typical days, but we didn’t actually ask). Only time and KPIs can determine if their confidence is well founded.Related: Most People in Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s Home State Want to Legalize MarijuanaThat is the economic paradox of 4/20. On one hand, marijuana sales boosted by consumer enthusiasm and holiday spirit are great for distributors of cannabis, who are already swimming in profits, but come at the expense of general employers who may notice their workforce is inexplicably missing in mass or notably less productive on April 20.Workplace managers might find the break room more crowded and lethargic than usual. Or perhaps, the office snack cupboard will be a bit more barren. For good or ill, it is just one day. Survey Finds Potheads Will Spend Freely on 4/20 and Might Go to Work, If They Have Jobs Download Our Free Android App Add to Queue Next Article Cannabis Image credit: Petri Oeschger | Getty Images April 20, 2018 Free Green Entrepreneur App Keep up with the latest trends and news in the cannabis industry with our free articles and videos, plus subscribe to the digital edition of Green Entrepreneur magazine. For decades April 20 has been a day of solidarity and defiance for marijuana users. With legalization it is morphing into an occassion for pot marketing similar to what Cinco de Mayo is for Mexican beer. Content Marketing Analyst Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. 3 min read –shares Mike Brown Guest Writerlast_img read more

Your Online Management Guru

first_img Next Article Jason Ankeny The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Apply Now » –shares Technology Your Online Management Guru Add to Queue ProjectsMilton’s Project Manager tool prepares estimates, tracks outstanding proposals and schedules follow-ups to help seal the deal. Once work begins, the service tracks time and expenses against the original estimate, and it also serves up follow-through reminders if a project appears to lose momentum. “Over time, you can compare projects and improve your estimates and pricing,” Ralph says. “It’s a great tool to determine what kinds of projects are most profitable.”ContactsYourMilton.com manages your contacts, projects and finances so you don’t have to. The brainchild of marketing, pricing and profitability expert Eric Ralph, the Milton web application organizes and simplifies project life cycles from start to finish, streamlining cost estimates, spending and billing along the way. “A lot of freelancers and small firms face the same problem–there’s no integrated system for them to manage all aspects of their business,” says Ralph, founder and president of Columbus, Ohio-based Milton. “Milton gives you that visibility.” Clarity begins with a list of questions designed to prioritize contacts and separate good leads from bad. Milton also reminds execs when it’s time to reconnect with clients, and it integrates contacts from different social networking platforms.FinancesMilton’s Finance Manager oversees client billing and sends reminders when invoices go 30 days past due. The service also assembles profitability reports broken down by client or project. And Milton’s own financial impact? The service is available to individuals for $15 per month, which includes unlimited contacts, projects and invoices. A three-user package is available for $60 monthly, with the option to add more users for an additional $20 each. This story appears in the September 2010 issue of . Subscribe » August 23, 2010 Magazine Contributor 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Meet Milton, a virtual office manager for small businesses in need of supervision. 2 min readlast_img read more

8 Startup Events and News to Watch This Week

first_img Global Entrepreneurship Week kicks off, Dabble offers lessons in landing a startup job, SCORE presents its practical guide to starting a nonprofit, the Guardian hosts the Activate conference in New York, Startup Weekend lets entrepreneurs loose with 3D printers and LASER cutters… This week’s notable news and startup events for entrepreneurs:1. It’s Global Entrepreneurship Week: Global Entrepreneurship Week is an international initiative that inspires people to realize their startup dreams. Check out activities and workshops through universities, bootcamps and community events near you. (World wide, Nov. 18 – 25)2. Want to land a job at a startup? Not everyone wants to create her own startup, and landing a job at a one can be difficult. Check out this job-search class at Dabble, where you’ll learn the in’s and out’s of marketing yourself as a desirable candidate for your dream job at a startup. (Denver, Nov. 18)3. A practical guide for starting nonprofits: Join SCORE New York City for this practical workshop that lays out the rules, regulations, challenges and strategies for building a nonprofit business. (New York City, Nov. 19)4. Get activated: The Guardian is hosting an event called Activate, which connects innovators and entrepreneurs who are using the internet to change the world, with professionals across all sectors. Get exposure at the Tech Talent Day pitch sessions, and hear informative speeches from top tier employees at companies like The New York Times, Save the Children, Amazon.com, Tumblr and more. (New York, Nov. 19 – 20)5. Amp up your spiritual fitness: Most people workout their bodies, but getting a workout routine for your mind is just as important. Learn the 15-concepts of a Spiritual Workout at the Impact HUB, from Steve Morrison, former psychotherapist turned solo-preneur. (San Francisco, Nov. 20)6. Engage with social marketing: At the Engage NYC event, attendees can expect the latest insights and best practices from world leaders in social marketing. Gain perspective on the future of the industry from analysts and content managers from notable brands like American Airlines and Intel. (New York, Nov. 21)7. Startup Weekend employs 3D printers: Startup Weekend is hosting a special Maker Edition in Toronto. Participants go through the standard 54-hour startup competition with one caveat, teams will get an opportunity to use the latest in 3D printing and LASER cutting technology to create a rapid prototype. (Toronto, Nov. 22)8. Next-gen cars in focus: Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are expected to take center stage at this week’s Los Angeles Auto Show. Honda, which recently released initial sketches of its next-generation fuel cell car, plans to launch the vehicle in the U.S. in 2015. Other makers are also expected to join the fray, as more hydrogen fueling stations come on line. (L.A., Nov. 22 – Dec. 1) 8 Startup Events and News to Watch This Week The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Spanning several countries, Global Entrepreneurship Week offers
aspiring entrepreneurs insight into starting up. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List –shares November 18, 2013center_img Brad Crescenzo Next Article Add to Queue 3 min read Technology Apply Now »last_img read more

Bruce Clay Launches New Type of WordPress SEO Plugin To Give Publishers

first_imgBruce Clay Launches New Type of WordPress SEO Plugin To Give Publishers a Competitive Edge MTS Staff WriterApril 24, 2019, 8:10 pmApril 24, 2019 Bruce Clay SEO WPMarketing TechnologyNewsSaaS softwareSearch marketing firmSEOToolSetWordPress SEO plugin Previous ArticleIntellimize Shakes up Web Personalization with $8 Million Series A, Helping Businesses Save 25 Years of A/B Testing Each YearNext ArticleKhronos Establishes Exploratory Group for 3D Commerce Standards and Guidelines Search marketing firm Bruce Clay Inc. launched a new WordPress SEO plugin, Bruce Clay SEO WP. Powered by the company’s proprietary SEOToolSet SaaS software, the new plugin gives needed SEO insights to writers and publishers directly in WordPress. Its patent-pending on-page SEO recommendations are customized per keyword, and integrated analytics shows users how content pages are performing in search.The plugin can be used with either the Gutenberg or classic editor interface in WordPress versions 4.5 or higher. It is also fully compatible with Yoast SEO plugins.“This new product is designed to fill gaps left by existing SEO plugins,” said Bruce Clay, president and founder of Bruce Clay Inc. “WordPress sites can run it alongside Yoast to provide missing data and features that publisher sites need to be very competitive in search.”Unlike other SEO plugins, which use hard-coded guidelines, the Bruce Clay SEO plugin analyzes the top-ranking Google search results for each keyword in real time. It then produces on-page guidance such as recommended keyword usage and word count ranges for the page’s meta tags, body content, and more. This enables writers to not just guess anymore.Marketing Technology News: New Social Trust Index Measures Automotive Brand Trust in a #Fakenews Era“Data on what the search engine is rewarding lets us set keyword and content targets. That gives writers a competitive edge over sites optimizing strictly on best guesses,” explained Clay. “Nobody should believe that every page needs to be 1000 words.”The software also checks for missing or duplicate titles, descriptions and other issues that can hurt SEO. Alerts on the dashboard tell users what needs to be fixed to optimize their content.Marketing Technology News: G2Crowd Named Panoply “High Performer” Data WarehouseIntegrations with Google Search Console and Google Analytics are also game-changing. Publishers can view performance data per post and per author within WordPress. “Most writers do not know how their content performs, so they’re blind to what is and isn’t working,” said Clay. For each page, WordPress users can see key data like: search queries driving traffic to the page, number of search clicks, average time on page, and average position in Google results. The plugin dashboard also reveals the top posts and top authors so that all contributors can see the impact of their writing.Marketing Technology News: Fred Santarpia, Former Chief Digital Officer at Condé Nast Inc., Named US Chief Digital Officer of the Year 2018 by CDO Clublast_img read more

New analysis of US data provides insights into workplace sexual harassment

first_imgOver the past 20 years, we’ve made great strides in reducing sexual harassment in the workplace, but those benefits have all gone to white women, and mostly to young white women. It seems as though men have gotten more careful about who they’re harassing and have been targeting women of color, who may be less likely to report the harassment.”Dan Cassino, MA, PhD, Study Co-Author, Fairleigh Dickinson University, New Jersey Source:WILEYJournal reference:Cassino, D. et al. (2019) Race, Threat and Workplace Sexual Harassment: The Dynamics of Harassment in the US, 1997‐2016. Gender, Work & Organization. doi.org/10.1111/gwao.12394 Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 20 2019A new Gender, Work & Organization analysis of U.S. data from 1997-2016 provides new insights into workplace sexual harassment.The analysis found that declines in workplace sexual harassment complaints have been uneven, with African-American women experiencing an increased risk of sexual harassment, even as overall reported harassment complaints are down. In addition, higher unemployment rates were linked to increases in sexual harassment of women in American workplaces. Specifically, a higher unemployment rate in a particular month was followed by an increase in the number of reported harassment cases in the following month.The authors noted that sexual harassment in the workplace appears to be an expression of power, or a way for men to assert their dominance. The shift from sexual harassment of white women to sexual harassment of African-American women indicates that harassers are conscious of power relationships and choose to target more vulnerable women in their workplaces. The link between changes in the unemployment rate and changes in sexual harassment indicates that men are more likely to engage in harassment behavior when they feel that their economic position in society is likely to be under threat.last_img read more