Deaf Sports Day A Success

first_imgOn Wednesday, 19 June, the third annual Active Deaf Kids Sports Day took place at Belconnen Stadium, Canberra, with the event attended by Federal Minister for Sport, Kate Lundy.The day looked to raise awareness of Deaf Sports Australia and encourage children with hearing impairments to participate in sport. The day allowed the children that attended to participate in various sports clinics, including one run by Touch Football ACT.Senator Lundy gave a short speech over morning tea which recognised Touch Football ACT, along with several other sporting organisations, for their work with Deaf Sports Australia.She also implored the kids present to get involved in sport, pointing towards both the health and friendship advantages that participating brings.“[There are] wonderful benefits of playing sport. Being fit and active is part of it, but also sport is something that unites us all,” she said.The event was also the forum for an announcement that $60,000 extra funding would be put forward by the Federal Government to go towards deaf sports stars attending the Deaf Olympics.Related LinksDeaf Sports Daylast_img read more

Montreal to chop 4000 ash trees on Mount Royal sickened by emerald

first_imgMONTREAL – The City of Montreal will chop down 4,000 ash trees on picturesque Mount Royal because they have been attacked by an invasive strain of beetle from Asia.“This isn’t a decision we’re making lightly, cutting trees on Mount Royal, 4,000 is a lot,” Coun. Luc Ferrandez, the executive committee member responsible for parks, said Wednesday.“It isn’t good news, but the way we’re responding is good.”Natural Resources Canada says the emerald ash borer has killed millions of ash trees in southwestern Ontario, Michigan and surrounding states and “poses a major economic and environmental threat to urban and forested areas in both countries.”The beetle was first detected in Canada and the United States in 2002 and spread east quickly to regions where ash trees were prevalent.In Montreal, officials awarded a contract to have the trees felled in the next year as they are deemed too far gone to receive the required insecticide treatment.Ferrandez said the cutting won’t leave any visual effect on the landscape and that the city will plant 40,000 replacement trees, mainly red oaks and maples.Jim Fyles, director of the Morgan Arboretum and Molson Nature Reserve at McGill University, says 4,000 is still but a small percentage of the mountain’s entire forest canopy of more than 100,000 trees of various types.“We have the emerald ash borer that is working its way through Montreal and lots of trees have been cut in the last five years,” said Fyles.“Likely those trees (identified by the city) will die between now and five years from now or 10 years from now and, in that situation, it’s prudent to be proactive about it.”Montreal and other communities have invested in a treatment, required every two years, at a heavy cost, depending on tree size.Scientists with the Canadian Forest Service, which is part of Natural Resources Canada, have estimated that costs to Canadian communities for treatment, removal and replacement of affected trees could be $2 billion over a 30-year period. There would also be other environmental impacts.The beetle has also been identified in 21 U.S. states and Fyles said some of those jurisdictions have lost all of their ash trees.“We’re more or less at the northern edge of where the emerald ash borer is now,” he said, adding it hasn’t moved as quickly as he thought it might.It’s hard to say how long the species will survive but, without ash trees, they starve and don’t move on to other types of trees.“Eventually, the whole thing will stabilize a bit because the treated ones will be healthy and untreated ones will be dead, but that’s how it’s unfolding now,” Fyles said.last_img read more

Rep Dr Bizon meets with Flint doctors

first_img10Feb Rep. Dr. Bizon meets with Flint doctors Tags: Flint water, Medical Society, REp. Bizon Categories: Bizon News,Featured news,News ##### Rep. Dr. John Bizon visited the city of Flint on Feb. 4 to meet with the Genesee County Medical Society leadership group and discuss the city water issue.Before the GCMS’s meeting, Rep. Bizon had the opportunity to discuss the health situations facing many in the city with executive director and group chief, Dr. Peter Levine.“We were able to talk about the health crisis going on in the city,” Rep. Bizon said. “Along with getting funding and resources to the people of the city, it is important that we know what health problems need to be solved as well.”The GCMS works to connect doctors and medical personnel from across the state to help spread information and tools. The GCMS is part of the Michigan State Medical Society.“The situation in Flint needs medical leadership to help the most people,” Rep. Bizon said. “Communication between doctors and political leaders in Lansing is the key to solving this crisis. We need to continue that communication.”For more information, contact Rep. Bizon’s office by email to DrJohnBizon@house.mi.gov or by phone to (517) 373-0555.last_img read more

The YahSat 1B satellite was successfully launched

first_imgThe YahSat 1B satellite was successfully launched from Baikonur onboard a Proton-M launcher on Monday night.The satellite, owned by UAE-based YahSat, which includes a Ka-band payload, will provide services to customers in the Middle East, Africa, Europe and south-western Asia. YahSat 1A was launched last year from French Guiana onboard an Ariane 5 rocket.last_img

Young women receiving health and beauty info from social media ignore risks

first_img Source:https://www.psu.edu/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 4 2018Young women who receive health and beauty information from their friends and through social media may be more likely to ignore the risks of indoor tanning, according to a team of researchers.In a study, researchers found a link between women who received health and beauty information from friends and beliefs that indoor tanning made them look and feel better. They also said that young women who relied on social media for health and beauty information also tended to reject the immediate risks of indoor tanning.According to Jessica Myrick, associate professor of communications, Penn State, most young women are aware of the risks of indoor tanning, but tan anyway. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has warned that exposure to UV radiation — whether from the sun or from artificial sources, such as the sunlamps used in tanning beds — increases the risk of developing skin cancer.”We are really trying to find out why young women engage in this behavior when most are well-aware and knowledgeable about the link between indoor tanning and skin cancer, yet they persist,” said Myrick. “We wanted to see if media use — particularly how young women use media to get information about beauty and how they talk to their friends and family about beauty and health — might influence those beliefs about the risks of indoor tanning.”The researchers, who report their findings in the current issue of the Journal of American College Health, said that when young women turned to their friends for health and beauty advice they were more likely to feel tanning made them look and feel better and, therefore, they were more likely to tan indoors.When they went to their family for that information, however, the women were less likely to indoor tan. Family members may undermine the belief that tanning would make the women feel good, a strong pull for indoor tanning, added Myrick, who worked with Seth M. Noar, professor of journalism, University of North Carolina; Jennah Sontag, postdoctoral fellow in public health, Center for Tobacco Studies, Rutgers and Dannielle Kelley, cancer prevention fellow, National Cancer Institute.”For a lot of people, if you think that indoor tanning will improve your mood — that it’s a good way to lift your spirits and feel better — then you’re more likely to tan indoors,” said Myrick. “If they received information about health and beauty from their family, they were less likely to think that tanning is a good way to improve their mood and so, when you decrease that link between tanning and mood benefits, then you’re less likely to tan.”Related StoriesResearchers identify potential drug target for multiple cancer typesHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerYoung women who received health and beauty information from news sites, rather than through social media outlets, were more likely to understand that tanning could negatively affect their appearance and understood the immediate risks of indoor tanning.Myrick suggests that the difference between social media and news sites as sources of health and beauty information may be related to how that information is filtered in those channels. News sites may offer more critical coverage of indoor tanning risks and be less susceptible to industry manipulation compared to the less editorially stringent social media outlets.According to the researchers, knowing how messages on indoor tanning are reaching young women may help shape skin cancer prevention efforts. Skin cancer prevention organizations may want to insert stories about indoor tanning’s link to skin cancer in young women into national media and amplify these messages using social media, they added. Young women should also be educated about skin cancer risks to help them both resist pressure from their peers to tan and to help spread more helpful information to their own peers.The researchers recruited 568 sorority members at a southeastern American university to complete an online survey about indoor tanning and health and beauty information sources. About 210 participants — or 37 percent — had tanned indoors. Of those 210 participants, 134 — or 64 percent — had tanned in the past year. In addition to tanning experience, the survey also asked participants about where they received health and beauty information — the news media, social media, friends and family — and how they assessed the possible negative and positive outcomes of indoor tanning.​last_img read more

Early clinical assessments could reduce endoflife hospitalizations for seniors

first_img Source:https://uwaterloo.ca/news/news/assessments-could-reduce-end-life-hospital-stays-seniors Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 8 2019Better use of standard assessment tools could help long-term care homes identify which new residents are at risk of hospitalization or death in the first 90 days of admission.A study from the University of Waterloo and Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging has found that newly admitted residents’ history of heart failure, as well as their score on the interRAI Changes to Health, End-Stage disease, Signs and Symptoms (CHESS) scale, can accurately determine which residents are most at risk.”Being able to identify at-risk residents early can help long-term care homes ensure they have the necessary care and management strategies in place,” said George Heckman, associate professor in the School of Public Health and Health Systems at Waterloo and Schlegel Research Chair in Geriatric Medicine. “These assessments can also help health providers determine which conditions require a trip to the hospital or which would be better managed as a hospice-type condition within the homes themselves.”Related StoriesStudy: Two-thirds of pneumonia patients receive more antibiotics than they probably needChildren’s Colorado granted IAC’s Cardiovascular Catheterization accreditation’Traffic light’ food labels associated with reduction in calories purchased by hospital employeesHe added, “It is not always advisable to take someone who is closing in on the end of life out of their home and put them into a hospital setting. These residents are very complex and frail, and not only might they not benefit from the hospital visit, the transition itself can lead to harms such as delirium and further disability.”The study examined data collected from 143,067 residents aged 65 years or older, admitted to long-term care homes in Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia, between 2010 and 2016.It found that over 15 percent of residents had a history of heart failure. Residents with heart failure were more likely to be hospitalized than those without (18.9 percent versus 11.7 percent). Residents with a history of heart failure were also twice as likely to have higher mortality rates than those without, 14.4 per cent versus 7.6 per cent. At the one-year mark, residents with a history of heart failure had a mortality rate of more than 10 per cent higher, at 28.3 percent compared to 17.3 percent.The CHESS scale identifies frailty and health instability, and is embedded within the MDS, an interRAI instrument mandated in almost all long-term care homes across Canada. Higher health instability, identified through higher CHESS scores, were associated with a greater risk of hospitalization and death at three months. Most notably, residents with high CHESS scores were more likely to die even when sent to hospital, regardless of whether they had heart failure or not. Mortality rates for the highest CHESS scores were 80 percent; most of these residents died in hospital.”Together, these two factors independently identified this increased risk,” Heckman said. “By making clinical assessments early, advance care planning discussions can take place. Furthermore, by ensuring that the entire long-term care home care team, including personal support workers, understand these risks, they can help monitor resident health and optimize their quality of life in the long-term care home.”last_img read more

Fetal heart rate monitoring can help health workers to identify at risk

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 30 2019Worldwide, there are over 3 million stillbirths and approximately 3 million newborn deaths each year, most in low-resource countries. About 2 million of these deaths are due to intrapartum hypoxia. There is a strong association between abnormal fetal heart rate and intrapartum-related deaths, therefore optimal fetal heart rate monitoring can help health workers identify at risk fetuses and take appropriate action to save lives.Related StoriesImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsResearch opens possibility of developing single-dose gene therapy for inherited arrhythmiasTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockTraditionally, health workers in low-resource countries have used a “fetoscope” to auscultate fetal heart rate. This is the most used tool but can be difficult in crowded maternity wards with a high patient/health worker ratio.This PhD is part of the Safer Births innovation and research project, and the studies were conducted at Haydom Lutheran Hospital in rural Tanzania using mixed methods. Two randomized trials were conducted; first testing fetoscope against hand-held Doppler, then fetoscope against Moyo (a new continuous fetal heart rate monitor developed by Laerdal Global Health). There were no significant differences between fetoscope and hand-held Doppler, however, focus group discussions revealed that health workers preferred the fetoscope, thus fetoscope was tested against Moyo in the subsequent trial. Moyo facilitated detection of abnormal fetal heart rate earlier and more often, leading to more obstetrical actions and a trend towards improved survival in the Moyo group. Studies powered to assess impact on perinatal outcomes are recommended. Source:https://www.uis.no/#Studierlast_img read more

TICTOC technology moves Tactile Internet a step closer to reality

first_imgETRI researchers developed technology capable of sending packets of digital information at 25 Gb/s (giga-bit per second) – 10 times faster than currently available speeds. Citation: TIC-TOC technology moves Tactile Internet a step closer to reality (2019, January 17) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-tic-toc-technology-tactile-internet-closer.html Researchers in South Korea have developed extremely fast information processing technologies that can help usher in the next generation of the Internet. Researchers at the Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) in South Korea have developed technology capable of sending packets of digital information at 25 Gb/s (gigabits per second) – 10 times faster than currently available speeds. The technology, named TIC-TOC, is a critical component of the future Tactile Internet, in which information is sent and received at speeds on par with human perception. More information: Kwang Ok Kim et al. High Speed and Low Latency Passive Optical Network for 5G Wireless Systems, Journal of Lightwave Technology (2018). DOI: 10.1109/JLT.2018.2866805 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Provided by Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute Explore further This technology operates at a speed fast enough to download a 3 GB movie within one second. Furthermore, the TIC-TOC system enables more urgent data to jump ahead of other information packets and be transferred in one millisecond (1/1000 of a second), the same speed at which the human sense of touch works. TIC-TOC stands for “Time Controlled Tactile Optical Access” and is designed to work on 5G networks. The researchers anticipate the TIC-TOC technology will help advance virtual reality and augmented reality in many sectors, from education and healthcare to entertainment and public safety. For example, it could be possible to deploy and operate robots in dangerous or disaster areas with instant sight and feel communication between human controllers and machines. When the machine sees something, the humans sees it, and when the human remotely controls the robot’s hand or head, the motion will happen immediately. The same could be true for telesurgery, with a doctor remotely controlling a robot performing the surgery, but the doctor feels as if she were in the operating room because the response is instantaneous.”The Tactile Internet is expected to be the fourth industrial revolution,” said HwanSeok Chung, a project leader at ETRI. “We will see robots, cars and all other machines connected to the Internet all around us. Tactile Internet will enable humans and machines to interact with each other even from far away.” The team developed TIC-TOC in order to help address the traffic jams that occurs within current information processing systems, causing delays. By increasing the speed at which information can be transmitted, and allowing more important information to jump the queue, they have ensured that as soon as a user clicks on a web page, it loads instantly, or they can watch a video live essentially without any delay. Described in the Journal of Lightwave Technology, the TIC-TOC technology consists of internet access control chips and optical transceivers to speed up data processing time. The optical transceiver converts high-speed electrical data into optical signals to transmit over optical fibers. The chips guarantee latency (the time from data’s origin to destination) is less than 1 millisecond with ETRI’s new low latency oriented packet scheduling technology controlling network traffic. The chips could further increase network speeds faster than 25 Gb/s by combining several channels for data transmission. A few hurdles remain before commercialization, such as system implementation. ETRI continues researching to solve such hurdles, and anticipates the tactile Internet enabled by TIC-TOC will be available within a year. Platform for mobile networks would bring services up to speeds of 100 Gbpslast_img read more

DMK BJP spar over alleged imposition of Hindi in Tamil Nadu

first_imgDMK, BJP spar over alleged imposition of Hindi in Tamil NaduDravida Munnetra Kazhagam (DMK) member Kalanidhi Veeraswamy Wednesday alleged the BJP-led NDA government attempted to impose Hindi on Tamil Nadu, which was thwarted by the Dravidian party.advertisement Next Press Trust of India New DelhiJuly 17, 2019UPDATED: July 17, 2019 21:22 IST Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (DMK) members T R Baalu and Dayanidhi Maran were also seen supporting Kalanidhi Veeraswamy.(File Photo)Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (DMK) member Kalanidhi Veeraswamy Wednesday alleged the BJP-led NDA government attempted to impose Hindi on Tamil Nadu, which was thwarted by the Dravidian party.Participating in the discussions on Demands for Grants for the Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports for 2019-20 in Lok Sabha, Kalanidhi Veeraswamy said the Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (DMK) will continue to protect Tamil speaking people’s linguistic pride.”There have been 3 attempts by the BJP-led NDA government to impose Hindi on Tamil people…We have agitated and successfully thwarted the BJP’s attempt to impose Hindi on Tamil Nadu,” Kalanidhi Veeraswamy said.Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (DMK) members T R Baalu and Dayanidhi Maran were also seen supporting Kalanidhi Veeraswamy.” We are Dravidians and have been opposing the imposition of Hindi since 1930. We will continue to protect our linguistic pride,” Kalanidhi Veeraswamy said.However, Bhartiya Janta Party (BJP) MP Rajiv Pratap Rudy protested and said that Hindi is India’s main language, how can DMK MP Veeraswamy speak against Hindi.”We are talking about Sports, where does imposition of Hindi come in…This is completely wrong,” Rajiv Pratap Rudy asserted.ALSO READ | Karnataka crisis: Section 144 imposed at Vidhana Soudha in Bengaluru from July 11 to 14ALSO READ | From Jai Shri Ram to Allahu Akbar: How our netas took an oath of duty in Lok SabhaALSO WATCH | BJP MP Om Birla unanimously elected as Lok Sabha speakerRead MoreFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment 0Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byShahrukh Tags :Follow DMKFollow BJPFollow Lok SabhaFollow HindiFollow Tamil peopleFollow Rajiv Pratap Rudyby Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYOU MAY LIKEShlopTop 10 Healthy Carbohydrates And Why You Need To Eat ThemShlopUndoTips and TricksHe pricks a needle into a banana and look what happens next! This trick is super handy!Tips and TricksUndoOnline Dating | Search AdsOnline Dating Sites That May Actually Surprise YouOnline Dating | Search AdsUndoTrip Minutes25 Most Dangerous Cities Tourists Should Never VisitTrip MinutesUndoPostFunDoctors Were Baffled When They Saw ThisPostFunUndoFood World Magazine30 Magical Fruits that Burn Fat Like CrazyFood World MagazineUndoby Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksFROM INDIA TODAY GROUPMangaluru college suspends 6 students after photo goes viralUndoThis is our culture: TMC MP Mimi Chakraborty’s constituency celebrates her Lok Sabha debut with vulgur danceUndoWoman who committed ‘suicide’ in Ghaziabad found alive in BengaluruUndoTamil Nadu water crisis: 400 DMK workers arrested for protesting, demanding minister’s resignationUndoKarnataka crisis: Congress leaders Ghulam Nabi Azad, Dinesh Gundu Rao detained in BengaluruUndoPooja Batra marries Nawab Shah in hush-hush ceremony, shares adorable photos. See picsUndolast_img read more

NASA Set To Launch a DeepSpace Atomic Clock Tonight

first_img NASA Wants Robots to Sniff Out Moon Pits for Astronaut Homes NASA is set to launch an incredible new atomic clock into orbit on a Falcon Heavy today (June 24) in a technology demonstration mission that could transform the way humans explore space. The Deep Space Atomic Clock, developed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is a space-ready upgrade to the atomic clocks we use here on Earth and to the clocks that already fly on satellites like those that provide GPS. Ideally, this new atomic clock will make spacecraft navigation to distant objects in space — on the journey to Mars, for example — more autonomous, NASA said in a statement. The precision in measurement of the spacecraft’s position that scientists hope to get with the Deep Space Atomic Clock will allow spacecraft traveling in deep space to act on their own, without much communication with Earth. It’d be a huge improvement to how spacecraft are currently navigated, NASA said. AdvertisementHow to Build the Most Accurate Atomic Clocks | VideoResearchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology use laser-cooled cesium atoms to develop ultra-accurate atomic clocks for GPS systems, global telecommunications and other essential technologies.Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65777-nasa-launching-deep-space-atomic-clock.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0005:0005:00Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball00:29Video – Giggly Robot02:31Surgical Robotics关闭  In essence, atomic clocks can correct themselves. In an atomic clock, the frequency of the quartz oscillator is transformed into the frequency that is applied to a collection of atoms from a specific element. If the frequency is correct, it will cause many electrons in the atoms to jump energy levels. But if it’s not, fewer electrons will jump. That tells the clock that the quartz oscillator is off-frequency and how much to correct it. On the Deep Space Atomic Clock, this correction is calculated and applied to the quartz oscillator every few seconds. But that’s not all that makes the Deep Space Atomic Clock special. This clock doesn’t just use mercury atoms, it also uses charged mercury ions. Because ions are atoms that have electric charge, they can be contained in an electromagnetic “trap.” This keeps the atoms from interacting with the walls of a vacuum chamber, a common problem with the neutral atoms used in regular atomic clocks. When they interact with the vacuum walls, environmental changes such as temperature can cause changes in the atoms themselves, and lead to frequency errors. The Deep Space Atomic Clock won’t be subject to such environmental changes, according to NASA, and so will be 50 times more stable than the clocks used on GPS satellites. After the clock launches today, scientists will be able to begin testing the clock’s precision as it spends days, then months in orbit. The Deep Space Atomic Clock will launch from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket as one of two dozen payloads. The 4-hour launch window opens at 11:30 p.m. EDT (0330 June 25 GMT); visit Space.com tomorrow for complete coverage of the launch. How NASA’s Mars 2020 Rover Will Work (Infographic) Follow Kasandra @KassieBrabaw. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoBirch Gold GroupThis IRS Tax Law is Sweeping the U.S.Birch Gold GroupUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoCNETMeet the US Navy’s new $13 billion aircraftCNETUndo Related: This Is What 2 Dozen Satellites Look Like Packed for Launch on a SpaceX Falcon Heavy But how does it work? Astronomers already use clocks to navigate in space. They send a signal to the spacecraft, which sends it back to Earth. The time of that round trip tells scientists the spacecraft’s distance from Earth. That’s because the signal is traveling at the speed of light, so armed with the time it took to go to the spacecraft and back, finding distance is but a simple calculation away. By sending multiple signals over time, scientists can calculate a spacecraft’s trajectory — both where it was and where it’s going. But in order to know a spacecraft’s location within a small margin of error, astronomers need very precise clocks that can measure billionths of a second, according to NASA. They also need clocks that are extremely stable. “Stability” here refers to how consistently a clock measures a unit of time. While you’d think that clocks always measure the same length of time as a “second,” clocks have a tendency to drift and slowly mark longer and longer times as a “second.” For measuring the locations of spacecrafts in distant space, astronomers need their atomic clocks to be consistent to better than a billionth of a second over days and weeks. Modern clocks, from those we wear on our wrists to those used on satellites, most often keep time using a quartz crystal oscillator. These take advantage of the fact that quartz crystals vibrate at a precise frequency when voltage is applied to them, NASA said in the statement. The vibrations act like the pendulum in a grandfather clock. But, by the standards of space navigation, quartz crystal clocks aren’t very stable at all. After six weeks, they may be off by a full millisecond, which translates at the speed of light to 185 miles (300 kilometers). That much error would have a huge impact on measuring the position of a fast-moving spacecraft, NASA said. Atomic clocks combine quartz crystal oscillators with certain types of atoms to create better stability. NASA’s Deep Space Atomic Clock will use mercury atoms and be off by less than a nanosecond after four days and less than a microsecond after 10 years. It would take 10 million years for the clock to be wrong by a whole second, according to NASA. Related: A NASA Atomic Clock on SpaceX’s Next Falcon Heavy Will Pioneer Deep-Space Travel Tech It may not be surprising to learn that atomic clocks take advantage of the structure of atoms, which are composed of a nucleus of protons and neutrons surrounded by electrons. The atoms of each element have a distinct structure, with a different number of protons in the nucleus. While the number of electrons each type of atom has can vary, the electrons occupy distinct energy levels, and a jolt of exactly the right amount of energy can cause an electron to jump to a higher energy level around the nucleus. The energy required to make an electron do this jump is unique to each element and consistent to all atoms of that element. “The fact that the energy difference between these orbits is such a precise and stable value is really the key ingredient for atomic clocks,” Eric Burt, an atomic clock physicist at JPL, said in the statement. “It’s the reason atomic clocks can reach a performance level beyond mechanical clocks.” Humans To Mars? Here’s What We’ll NeedDava Newman, NASA Deputy Administrator, explains how solar-electric propulsion, deep space atomic clocks, spacesuits, and laser communication are key technologies for humans to explore Mars and beyond.Credit: NASAVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65777-nasa-launching-deep-space-atomic-clock.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0002:3202:32Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball00:29Video – Giggly Robot02:31Surgical Robotics关闭  Fusion Powered Spacecraft Could Be Just A Decade Awaylast_img read more

BJP government guilty of strategic ignorance says CongressBJP government guilty of strategic

first_imgSHARE COMMENT politics parties and movements February 22, 2019 COMMENTS SHARE SHARE EMAIL terrorism (crime) Manish Tewari says seeking answers for hard questions does not weaken national security The Congress stepped up its criticism of the BJP-led Centre for “strategic ignorance” and “irresponsible utterances” after the Pulwama terror attack.The BJP retorted by saying the Opposition is not standing with the country at a time when the entire world is standing with it.Congress President Rahul Gandhi reiterated his party’s charge that Prime Minister Narendra Modi was busy shooting a self-promotion film after the attacks. “Even after three hours of the news of the 40 soldiers being martyred in the Pulwama terror strike, the Prime-time Minister continued with the film shooting,” Rahul Gandhi tweeted.BJP spokesperson Sambit Patra said he will not respond to such “baseless allegations.” “On one hand, all countries are standing with India… humanity is standing with us, but some political parties, for their petty politics, are not standing with the country,” Patra told reporters here on Friday.Asking hard questionsCongress spokesperson and former minister Manish Tewari said asking hard questions strengthens national security. “The NDA-BJP government needs to understand that asking hard questions does not weaken national security. As the oldest political party in the country, we will continue to ask the hard questions because the nation demands answers from this government. We will not allow jingoistic arrogance to sweep monumental security failures under the carpet.”Questions PM Tewari said the Prime Minister should tell the country what was he doing between 3.10 pm and 5.10 pm on the day of the attack. He said Modi addressed a rally over his mobile phone and did not say anything on the Pulwama attack. How does the BJP get monopoly over nationalism that one of their ministers very arrogantly stated yesterday that the Congress sounds like Pakistan, asked Tewari.He said either the PM deliberately decided not to pay homage to the martyred soldiers in the rally he addressed, or he was unaware that a terror attack had taken place in Pulwama. “We are a nuclear State and if there is a breakdown in communication between the Prime Minister and his office, it has very portentous implications. That is why this nation must know from the Prime Minister himself, who otherwise speaks nonstop, 24X7,” Tewari said.Congress’ proposal He said the Congress has therefore formed a task force on national security, which will define its own role and parameters. He said the panel will come up with a fresh approach on tackling contentious problems relating to national security. Published onlast_img read more

New migrants brought to Libya centre hit by deadly air strike

first_img Related News Related News CAIRO (Reuters) – More migrants have been moved to a detention centre in Libya’s capital where an air strike killed more than 50 last week, despite a risk it could be hit again which led to survivors being evacuated, Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) said on Friday.Around 95 migrants were moved to the Tajoura centre in Tripoli on Thursday, some rounded up in the local community and others transferred from another detention centre in the city, the aid group said.Earlier in the week migrants left at the centre after the July 3 bombing — some of whom were sleeping in the open for fear of another strike — were either released or evacuated, following appeals from the United Nations.An official at the Tajoura centre who asked not to be named said that following the evacuations, “we have resumed work and started receiving more (migrants)”. He declined to give more details. World 03 Jul 2019 At least 44 die as air strike hits Libya migrant detention centre – U.N. World 10 Jul 2019 Bombed Tripoli migrant detention centre being emptied – U.N.center_img World 10 Jul 2019 At least 100 migrants walk free from shelled detention centre in Tripoli The centre was hit as forces loyal to eastern-based commander Khalifa Haftar intensified their efforts to wrest control of Tripoli from forces aligned with the internationally recognised government, which is based in the capital. The fighting is the latest escalation in a conflict that developed after former leader Muammar Gaddafi was toppled in a NATO-backed uprising in 2011. People smugglers exploited the turmoil to send hundreds of thousands of migrants on dangerous journeys across the central Mediterranean, though the number of crossings dropped sharply from 2017 amid an EU-backed push to block departures. Haftar’s Libyan National Army (LNA) launched an offensive on Tripoli in early April, which soon stalled. The fighting has left more than 1,000 dead, including more than 100 civilians, according to the World Health Organization. Migrant detention centres are nominally under the government but often controlled by armed groups. Aid workers and rights groups say abuse including beating and forced labour is rife, and have long appealed for their closure. But the centres have continued to operate, repeatedly caught in the crossfire of fighting whilst receiving new arrivals from boats intercepted by Libya’s EU-backed coastguard. The Tajoura centre, which is next to a miliary camp, was also hit by a projectile in May. The United Nations said last week it had information that guards had shot at migrants at Tajoura as they tried to flee the air strike. The interior ministry in Tripoli denied the report. This week, 419 migrants, including around 90 who had just been intercepted at sea, left the Tajoura centre for a facility run by the U.N. refugee agency. It tries to evacuate refugees and asylum seekers from Libya, though the process is slow.Sam Turner, MSF’s Libya head of mission, said it was an “outstanding contradiction” for migrants to be released from the centre in recognition that it was not safe, only for more to be brought in days later. “The Tajoura detention centre does pose a very high risk of being targeted as part of the wider conflict, in addition to the risks that refugees and migrants are exposed to by the conflict in general and by the conditions of detention,” he said. (Additional reporting by Ahmed Elumami in Tripoli; Writing by Aidan Lewis) {{category}} {{time}} {{title}}last_img read more