U.S. Covid cases could near zero in 6 months, UBS economist says

first_imgThe United States has experienced more than 10 million Covid-19 cases since the pandemic started. The country has seen record highs this week in terms of coronavirus hospitalizations and daily infections, with 153,496 cases on Thursday, according to Johns Hopkins University.This comes as speculation mounts on whether the U.S. economy will be shut down once again. An advisor to President-elect Joe Biden has said that closing businesses for four to six weeks could help reduce the number of infections and get the economy on track until a vaccine is approved and distributed.With cases surging in Chicago, Mayor Lori Lightfoot asked residents on Thursday to cancel Thanksgiving plans and stay indoors. – Advertisement – LONDON — The latest coronavirus vaccine developments have brightened the outlook for the U.S. economy, with UBS economists boosting their GDP forecasts for the country. Pfizer and BioNTech announced Monday that their Covid-19 vaccine was more than 90% effective in preventing the infectious disease. The announcement fueled optimism that the pandemic could come to an end sooner rather than later, driving up stock markets globally.- Advertisement – UBS had originally estimated that the number of coronavirus infections in the U.S. would approach zero by the end of 2021, but the vaccine news has made the bank bring that forecast forward by six months.“We might get a situation where reported cases of Covid in the United States fall very close to zero in Q2 (second quarter) of next year. That six month difference, that two-quarter difference matters a lot, it means an extra 1 to 1.25 percentage point gain in GDP next year,” Seth Carpenter, chief U.S. economist at UBS, told CNBC’s Joumanna Bercetche on Thursday.He added that the vaccine news “was very encouraging” because the efficacy rate came in much higher than analysts were anticipating.- Advertisement –center_img – Advertisement – Carpenter’s comments differ to the caution portrayed by experts such as White House coronavirus advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci. He warned on Thursday that a vaccine may not be enough to help eradicate the disease.“I doubt we are going to eradicate this. I think we need to plan that this is something we may need to maintain control over chronically. It may be something that becomes endemic, that we have to just be careful about,” he said.Fiscal supportThe performance of the U.S. economy in 2021 will also depend on how much fiscal stimulus is approved. Talks between Democrats and Republicans have not yielded a deal, and there’s more uncertainty in the aftermath of the presidential election.Carpenter believes U.S. policymakers will disappoint markets by providing a lower-than-expected support package.“We are actually a little bit pessimistic here relative to where the market is, so we have written down about a $450 billion package that comes in Q1 (first quarter) next year,” he said. In speaking with clients, he said markets are expecting $1 trillion in fiscal stimulus.UBS assumes that Republicans will retain control of the Senate. If the Senate were to be led by Democrats, the bank believes the stimulus could be near $1 trillion.Correction: An earlier version misstated the amount in the first U.S. fiscal stimulus package.last_img read more

NEWS SCAN Special Edition: MRSA in healthcare settings

first_imgMar 25, 2009 – The annual meeting of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America took place Mar 20-22 in San Diego. This News Scan Special Edition surveys a selection of the abundant research from that meeting on combating MRSA in healthcare institutions.’Positive Deviance’ makes difference in reducing MRSA ratesThree hospitals and healthcare systems in different parts of the United States significantly reduced their in-house transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by mounting a multi-pronged prevention effort of active surveillance, hand hygiene, and contact precautions. A key to the program’s success was “Positive Deviance,” an organizational technique that identifies personnel who are good problem solvers and keeps their ideas from being stifled by custom and hierarchy. The trial, co-sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Plexus Institute, reduced MRSA incidence in the hospitals by up to 62%.Invasive MRSA declining, may be due to hospital control effortsA CDC analysis of data from the Active Bacterial Core surveillance system, drawn from nine sites across the United States, shows that cases of invasive hospital-onset MRSA declined 16% from 2005 to 2007. Invasive cases that were due to hospital infection, but arose after discharge, declined 8.7%. In a related survey of 134 hospitals, almost all were deploying some MRSA-prevention measures out of a generally accepted menu of seven recommended practices, though no hospital was using all seven. The reduction in invasive MRSA may be linked to hospitals’ increased efforts.MRSA control in ICU leads to reductions throughout hospitalA MRSA-prevention campaign at the Billings Clinic, a 270-bed community hospital in Billings, Mont., demonstrated that limited control efforts may have broad reach. The hospital instituted active surveillance and hand hygiene in its 22-bed ICU and saw hospital-wide MRSA incidence fall from 1.2 cases per 1,000 patient-days to 0.27 per 1,000; reductions continued for 20 months.MRSA cases in hospitals may have been acquired in communityAn analysis of patients in a large Delaware healthcare system who were newly identified as having MRSA colonization shows that the vast majority of colonizations were not acquired during the hospital stay, but were present on admission. Only 13% were acquired in-hospital, suggesting that programs aimed at stopping hospital transmission could not have prevented them, and demonstrating that the complex epidemiology of MRSA in hospital and community is likely to complicate MRSA control.Community strains causing increasing number of hospital infectionsAt Stroger Hospital, the main public hospital for downtown Chicago, the incidence of hospital-associated bloodstream infections caused by MRSA has not changed significantly over 7 years. However, the proportion of those invasive infections caused by a community-genotype MRSA strain has more than doubled, from 32% of cases in 2000-2003 to 68% in 2004-2007.last_img read more

Linda Schneider September 20, 1944 – August 1, 2019

first_img“She had tenacity”Linda S. Schneider, age 74 of Bright, Indiana passed away Thursday, August 1, 2019 at her home. Born September 20, 1944 in Cincinnati, Ohio the daughter of Clyde and Anita (Jacobs) Allen.Married Jerry Schneider May 14, 1988 in Cincinnati, Ohio. Linda was a member of NewSong Church Harrison, Ohio and retired from UPS.Survived by her husband Jerry Schneider. Mother of Connie (Dwight) Storck, Melissa Pelcha, Sherri Pelcha, Toni Wright, Shannon Wydner, Cera (Michael Owens) Haas, Caity Haas, Randy Schneider, Bob Schneider, Rick (Christa) Schneider and Raejean (Gary) Downs. Grandmother of 34, great grandmother of many. Sister of Carol (James) Miracle, Kit Allen, Mari “Wink” (Bill) Gray, Bobbi Jo (James) Hammon, Debbie Reynolds, Dorothy Gorman, Charlie, Mike and Butch Allen.Preceded in death by her parents Clyde Allen and Anita Reynolds, siblings Pete Allen and Barbara “Boo” Allen.Visitation will be held Thursday, August 8, 2019 from 5:00 P.M. until time of funeral services at 8:00 P.M. all at NewSong Church 120 North State Street Harrison, Ohio 45030 with Pastor Chris Sheneman officiating.Memorials may be directed to NewSong Church and/or Loving Hearts Hospice c/o Jackman Hensley Funeral Home 215 Broadway Street Harrison, Ohio 45030.last_img read more