It’s time to grow forage, take inventory, and use it efficiently

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Victor Shelton, NRCS state agronomist/grazing specialistFall is here and it means that our perennial forages are starting to think about taking a siesta. You will want to do three things this time of year: grow as much forage as you can prior to plants going dormant, be as efficient as you can with what you have to graze, and take inventory on how much winter feed you have on hand.There are still plenty of good growing days left this fall and they need to be taken advantage of. One of the first things to do to make sure you obtain as much growth as possible, especially with perennial forages, is to stop grazing forages that can and will continue to grow for a while, especially forages that will stockpile like tall fescue.Tall fescue stockpiles better than almost any other forage in the midwest. I would rather that not be old Kentucky 31 endophyte-infected fescue, but even KY 31 makes some really good feed in the winter time, especially after going through a few hard freezes. Freezing and time help to improve it. Forages that will not stockpile well or ones that lose quality and nutritional value fast once they go dormant or freeze should be utilized first. But, before you open the gate to that pasture field with forages that won’t stockpile for later, please consider first what other options you have right now. Remember what was mentioned last month; the more you can grow now, the more you will have to graze and the less feed will be needed.So, what do we have to graze? Hopefully you did better than me and got some annuals planted early enough and have a lot of good growth on them. Oats especially, if planted back in early August, will make some excellent forage now. These oats are probably best utilized by strip grazing them. We’ll talk about that a bit more in a while.If you planted a warm-season forage mix after wheat harvest, these forages can still be grazed now but with some caution as we approach colder weather. Once frosted, summer annual warm-season grasses such as sudangrass or sorghum-sudangrass hybrids quickly start shutting down and can produce a cyanide-containing compound commonly called prussic acid. This acid is the same compound that is produced by these plants under stressed conditions. Livestock should be removed from these forages for ten to fourteen days to allow the forages to “dry down” and the prussic acid to dissipate before grazing again. Frosted areas could be only “pockets” in a field to start with. Any regrowth from the base of the plant after a frost can also be very high in prussic acid. If in doubt about nitrates or prussic acid – test before feeding or grazing!Corn stalks, like discussed last month, can help provide some good quality feed and will be even better if annuals were planted into them. Dry soil conditions are ideal and again, strip grazing across the field is better than just turning them into the whole. We want those stalks to last as long as they can and we also don’t want to cause any compaction for the next crop. Grazing it under dry conditions, using a cover crop such as cereal rye, and not feeding on the crop field can help prevent and/or relieve compaction issues associated with grazing it.Hay field aftermath may also be used as potential grazing. We are certainly at a point in time when it is not practical to really think about any more hay, especially where little forage regrowth is present and never mind how hard it can be to get it dry at this point. It’s also hard to justify the costs of the necessary operations for what little forage is normally still remaining this time of year.Another option that most people don’t think about or even consider as an option this time of year is hay or other stored feeds. If you do not have anything else to graze other than pasture AND there is sufficient moisture, nutrients and time for more growth, then feeding some hay for a little while can allow for some growth that can be utilized later. I’ve actually done this in August before because of droughty conditions.You want to be as efficient as possible with whatever you are grazing this time of year. You want the stalks or forage to last as long as possible and you don’t want to waste too much either. Even if you don’t strip graze any other time of the year, once forage growth slows down and especially after it stops, it really increases harvest efficiency. It’s probably best to think of any remaining forage or stockpile as “standing” forage or “standing hay.” You allocate out hay by the bale as needed, so why wouldn’t you allocate out stockpiled forage the same way? You wouldn’t turn the cows into the hay barn and say just eat what you need and don’t waste any!You can very easily strip graze across hay aftermath, stockpiled fields and corn residue with the use of some temporary fence. All you need is some step-in posts, some poly-wire on a reel and a way to make it electrified and you’re in business. Use a simple plastic step-in post every 25 to 30 feet or as needed depending on the terrain and allocate out one to three days worth at a time. You will quickly recognize if you provided enough and adjust the next allocation. The cows will let you know if you shorted them. It’s best to start at the watering facility end of the field and work away from it unless you have multiple watering sites.Lastly, it is important to know how much forage, stockpiled forage, stalks, hay aftermath, annuals, hay, and other feed stuff is available for this winter. Weigh this against what is going to be needed for all the ruminant livestock on the farm. Do you have enough feed items until spring? Remember, on average, most ruminant livestock will utilize at least 3% of their body weight in dry matter per day (1,000 pound cow = 30 pounds of dry hay, not adjusted for moisture). Feeding efficiency of fed feeds is just as important as the allocation efficiency of standing forages. If poorly stored hay is also poorly fed, then up to fifty percent of a bale can be wasted. We’ll try and talk about this subject more next month.If you are short on forages and stored feed for this winter then now is the time to think about animal numbers. Do you have some that could or need to be culled? The quicker those animals leave the farm the better. Sharpen your pencil and do some math.Plan ahead for the coming winter and keep on grazing!last_img read more

Councillor arrested for thrashing SI

first_imgA BJP councillor was arrested for allegedly thrashing a police sub-inspector in the Kankar Khera area of Meerut in Uttar Pradesh, the police said on Saturday.The incident occurred on Friday evening when Mohiuddinpur police outpost in-charge Sukhpal Singh and his female friend, an advocate, visited a restaurant owned by councillor Manish Chaudhary.Circle Officer at Daurala Pankaj Kumar Singh said the trigger for the incident was the woman expressing displeasure over not getting their order on time. She allegedly threw away the food when it was finally served. Mr. Chaudhary protested against her action, which led to an altercation among the three. Mr. Chaudhary allegedly thrashed Mr. Singh and pushed the woman advocate, the Circle Officer said.The woman alleged that she was harassed and beaten up by the BJP councillor, following which he was booked under relevant sections of the Indian Penal Code, the police said.Ruckus outside stationIn another complaint, the sub-inspector alleged that Mr. Chaudhary attacked him while he was on duty. Superintendent of Police (city) Ranvijay Singh said that after the arrest, Mr. Chaudhary’s supporters tried to free him and gherao the van carrying him. They created a ruckus outside the police station and raised slogans, hindering traffic, Mr. Singh said.A medical test on the sub-inspector and his friend showed alcohol in their blood.last_img read more

If I try and become a bowler, I will lose whatever I have: Kedar Jadhav

first_imgKedar Jadhav, one of India’s heroes in their eight-wicket victory over Pakistan in the Asia Cup, said he does not want to become a fulltime bowler. India bundled out Pakistan for 162 and then easily chased down the target with 21 overs to spare.Jadhav, an off-spinner with a slinging action, rattled Pakistan’s middle order at the Dubai International Stadium on Wednesday finishing with 3/23.Bhuvneshwar Kumar (3/15) sent back openers Imam-ul-Haq and Fakhar Zaman early on to leave Pakistan struggling with two wickets down after 4.1 overs with just two runs on the board.Shoaib Malik (43) and Babar Azam (47) negotiated the spin duo of Yuzvendra Chahal and Kuldeep Yadav well and the pair stitched together an 82-run stand for the third wicket.India vs Pakistan: Report | Highlights | As it happened | PhotosLeft-arm wrist spinner Kuldeep Yadav triggered Pakistan’s slide with a brilliantly executed wrong un’ that outfoxed Pakistan’s best batsman Babar Azam (47) when he was looking good along with Shoaib Malik (43).Jadhav removed Pakistan captain Sarfraz Ahmed (6) around the halfway mark of the first innings before accounting for Asif Ali (9) and Shadab Khan (8).Also Read: Sarfraz Ahmed admits Pakistan stumped by Kedar JadhavJadhav bowled 9 overs against Pakistan and has bowled 10 overs in a match only once in 42 ODI appearances.”My role in the team is to contain batsmen and in that process if I get a wicket, it’s fine,” Jadhav said at the post match press conference.”My bowling is all about trying to read the batsman, My plan is to bowl stump to stump, if you score, it’s fine but if you miss, wickets are there for me. Honestly, I bowl one or two overs before the match at training. I don’t bowl much at the nets. I feel if I try and become a bowler, I will lose whatever I have. So I stay within limits (laughs),” he added.advertisementRead – Rohit Sharma lauds Kedar Jadhav: He takes his bowling very seriouslyJadhav, who has proven himself to be more than a handy all-rounder, returned to the side after recovering from a hamstring surgery.Read – Pakistan had no plans and they looked rattled, says Wasim Akram”In the last six months, I’ve been injured more than three times on my left hamstring. After the IPL, again I got injured, so we decided to go for surgery. I feel after the surgery it has definitely helped me fitness wise, I don’t have it in my mind that I will get injured again. In the last four months, I’ve learnt a lot about training and fitness, and it has definitely made me a better cricketer.””Previously, when I got injured, and I returned to play after rehab, I used to feel I’m fit and it [injury] won’t come again. Many times I used to skip my routines. But after the third time, regardless of how I feel, everyday I start my day with training: both gym and running. So that gives me confidence that I’m getting stronger and fitter every day, and that helps me on the field,” he said.Read – Mohammad Azharuddin critical of Pakistan’s negative approachIndia and Pakistan will meet again in the Super Four stage of the tournament at the Dubai International Stadium on Sunday.(With inputs from IANS)last_img read more