Marking 80 Years, Red Bank Library Opens History Room

first_imgBy John Burton |RED BANK — Libraries are more than books. And that is especially true of Red Bank’s 80-year-old public lending library, which offers a slice of history with its books and other material.“Every library has books,” Elizabeth McDermott, the library’s director, observed last Saturday. “But we’re the only library that has a Red Bank history collection.”Red Bank Public Library assistant Claire Phelps joins in the library’s celebrating its 80th anniversary last Saturday making buttons of children’s artwork.And that collection is once again available for the public’s viewing.McDermott was joined on May 20 by numerous community residents, elected officials and library representatives in offering their support and congratulations to the library as it celebrated its eighth decade as the Eisner Memorial Public Library and the reopening of its historical collections to the public.The day was marked by celebration and activities that included “a birthday bash for kids,” with cake and the announcements of the winners of the town-wide bookmark contest for school-age children; establishing a teen time capsule, intended to be opened in 2037; and a guided tour of the borough’s historic sites. And the day’s highlight concerned the reopening of the local history room that was honored by proclamations from the Borough Council, the state Senate and Assembly and the county freeholders.The history room’s opening “allows us to show our passion for all things Red Bank,” McDermott noted.The purpose of the room, according to its mission, is to collect, maintain and preserve materials of local history for the benefit of historians, library patrons and the greater public. The emphasis is on history pertaining to Red Bank and communities in the vicinity, the county and the state and the Eisner family, whose former home now houses the library at 84 West Front St.The library was forced to close its museum area and history room in 2014 when hit with financial difficulties. Those difficulties resulted in the loss of staff and the cutback in operating hours, McDermott recalled. But the library’s Board of Trustees’ 2016 strategic plan, working with the Borough Council, was able to restore some staffing, hours and the availability of the historical resources to the public.Red Bank has had a long and storied history, said Eileen Moon, journalist, former managing editor of The Two River Times, and author of the book “Legendary Locals of Red Bank.” Beginning as a riverfront respite for the Native American nomadic tribe that traveled through the area for thousands of years, the community evolved into a commerce and distribution hub, with merchants using the Naveink River as a way to transport oysters—which were terribly profitable—and other items to New York City in the 18th century, according Moon. Moon also noted the trip back then, from what was then called Shrewsbury Dock to New York City, took 13 days by schooner.George Bowden, a former member of the Red Bank Historic Preservation Commission, joins library assistant Katey O’Connell-Strollo, for the reopening of the Red Bank Public Library’s local history room.In the late 19th century, Mayor Pasquale Menna told how Sigmund Eisner moved to the borough “with nothing” at the age of 21. “He bought a sewing machine and opened a business on Broad Street,” Menna said, from which the Eisner family established a home at 84 West Front St. and Sigmund eventually opened his uniform factory at what is now the Galleria commercial complex on Bridge Avenue. At its height, Menna said the factory employed more than 5,000 people. In 1937, the Eisners donated the family home to the borough, to be used as a library, and established a trust to care for the building, in honor of the by-then late patriarch.And now, “We’re sitting amidst history,” Menna said.“The library is here and will continue,” thanks to the Eisners’ generosity and due to the work of the library’s staff, Menna maintained. “Their legacy continues.”In 1878, a group of local women established the Mutual Library Association, through private donor funds. The association collected and lent books out of private homes. A little later the library found a home, using a building on the east side of Broad Street, later the site of Clayton and Magee’s clothing store. In 1890, the library was officially incorporated as the Red Bank Library Company.This article was first published in the May 25-June 1, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

FAVORED FOOTSTEPSINBRONZE TAKES $60,000 DREAM TEAM ALLOWANCE BY 1 ¼ LENGTHS UNDER BEJARANO; CALLAGHAN TRAINEE GETS MILE ON TURF IN 1:37.94

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (June 4, 2015)–Favored Footstepsinbronze saved ground at the rail and went on to a comfortable 1 ¼ length win under Rafael Bejarano in Thursday’s $60,000 The Dream Team allowance feature at Santa Anita, as he covered one mile on turf in 1:37.94.Owned by Adam Richey and trained by Simon Callaghan, the 4-year-old Irish-bred colt bested seven rivals as he improved his overall record to 7-3-3-0. Off at 2-1, he paid $6.20, $3.40 and $2.60. With the winner’s share of $36,000, Footstepsinbronze increased he earnings to $152,250.“Coming into the stretch, I definitely wanted him to switch off his left lead, but he didn’t want to,” said Bejarano, who sat a close third before splitting horses two-wide at the top of the stretch. “In the last sixteenth though, he did switch and he showed me a big kick.”(Bejarano, who entered the 24th day of Santa Anita’s Spring Meeting atop the jockey standings with Tyler Baze at 23 wins, picked up his second win on the card).“I was a little worried about how slow the turf has been playing but he looked so great in the paddock,” said Callaghan, who has had Footstepsinbronze for all seven of his starts. “I knew he was going to run a good race. He’s been training really well…We’ll probably wait for Del Mar and look for an overnight stake now. He’s only getting better and he likes Del Mar.”Next to last early, runner-up Jules Journey finished well and just held Texas Ryano off by a neck for the place. Ridden by Santiago Gonzalez, Jules Journey was off at 7-2 and paid $4.60 and $3.00.With Joe Talamo up, Texas Ryano was last early and closed with a rush toward the middle of the course to finish third, 1 ¼ lengths clear of pacesetter Home School. Off at 5-2, “Tex” paid $2.80 to show.Ridden by Felipe Valdez, Irish-bred Home School bounced to the lead and set fractions of 25.03, 49.64, 1:13.35 and 1:25.57.First post time for an eight-race card on Friday at Santa Anita is at 4 p.m. Admission gates open at 11 a.m. for simulcasting from the eastern time zone.last_img read more

Five Indians qualify for World Amateur Golfers Championship

first_imgBengaluru: Five Indians, competing at the 11th Sara Futura Karnataka Golf Festival (KGF), have qualified for the World Amateur Golfers Championship (WAGC) to be held in Borneo, Malaysia in October. The winners of KGF, which is an amateur golf championship supported by Karnataka Tourism, earned the rights to represent India at the WAGC. On Sunday on the concluding day of the event, Narender Kudwa won the 21-24 handicap category with a gross score of 40, while Sandeep Malhan (16-20, 41 points), MK Aiyappa (11-15, 41 points), Amit Khansaheb (6-10, 40 points) and David D’Souza (0-5, 39 points) emerged as the overall winners. The KGF, which is an annual event, saw participation from over 500 golfers from across the country. Among the star names that participated in the tournament include former India cricketers Karun Nair, Subramaniam Badrinath, Sujith Somasunder, along with Lakshmipathy Balaji and Venkatesh Prasad.last_img read more

Art Of The Brain Celebrates 17th Anniversary Gala For Brain Cancer Research

first_imgOn Saturday, September 17 beginning at 6:30 PM at UCLA’s Schoenberg Hall and Plaza, 445 Charles E. Young Drive, East, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Art of the Brain, (AOB) an unprecedented organization of “Brain Buddies,” brain cancer patients and families who celebrate art, creativity and life undefeated by brain cancer, will enjoy its 17th anniversary Gala.Hundreds of friends will gather to enjoy the festivities, food, music, and entertainment. Jason Barry, award-winning reporter from CBS 5 in Phoenix, AZ will reprise his annual role as Master of Ceremonies for the evening.This year’s gala will honor and remember Art of the Brain’s founder, Judi Kaufman, who lost her courageous 18-year battle against brain cancer in September 2015. In recognition of the extraordinary efforts of Kaufman, it will be announced at the gala that the entryway to the UCLA Neuro Oncology clinic, a hallway that Kaufman walked down countless times during her last 18 years, will be named The Judi Kaufman Gallery. In addition to this honor, the entryway to the Reed Neurological Research Center at UCLA is now the Judi Kaufman Lobby honoring Kaufman and Art of the Brain.A successful entrepreneur, community activist and poet, Kaufman was diagnosed with her first brain cancer tumor in 1997. Based on Kaufman’s vision, AOB centers on creativity, in all its forms, as a vehicle to help brain cancer patients survive and regain their self-esteem in the face of debilitating brain cancer side effects. Kaufman turned to poetry as her path back to hope in the wake of the damaging effects of brain cancer and its treatments. A published poet, Kaufman’s books of poetry include “Passion and Shadow: The Lights of Brain Cancer”, and “Do You Want Your Brain to Hurt Now or Later?” The organization also highlights brain cancer patients and their families and is focused on raising funds for brain cancer research. AOB’s unique network of volunteer Brain Buddies, who help to support and mentor individuals and families struggling with brain cancer, also comprise the small army of volunteers who make the annual Art of the Brain gala a success.“Although Judi said goodbye to us just one year ago, her creative soul, courageous spirit, and most importantly, her loving heart will never leave us. Her heart continues to beat in all the lives that she touched. Her spirit surrounds all of us. Through Art of the Brain, her fight, her love and her heart will beat on forever,” said Roy Kaufman, Judi’s husband.Art of the Brain raises public awareness about brain cancer, spotlights the strength and courage of brain cancer patients, and helps raise money for brain cancer research at UCLA’s Neuro-Oncology Program in order to find a cure. Since 1999, AOB has garnered almost $10 million for brain cancer research.Art of the Brain’s 2016 Gala is generously sponsored by: 
The Kaufman Family 
Johnny Mercer Foundation 
Richard Dean Anderson 
Ann Ramer 
Joan and Gerald Doren 
Arlene Spiegelman 
Faramarz Yousefzadeh 
Fred Hayman Family Foundation 
Jadi and Gy Waldron 
Jennifer Kaufman and Vladimir Valdes 
Marlene and David Capell 
Nu Image 
Valerie and Bob Fairbank 
Joyce and Bill Bromiley 
Bunny Wasser and Howard BernsteinFor tickets, or more information email Patti Lawhon at plawhon@kblrinc.com, call 424.252.6908, or visit www.artofthebrain.org.last_img read more