Election night ends with surprise Trump victory over Clinton

first_imgRepublican presidential nominee Donald Trump won the 2016 election on Tuesday night, beating out Democrat Hillary Clinton in a narrow and largely unexpected victory.Of the 11 battleground states — Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin — nine went to Trump.There was a tense flip-flop between Trump and Clinton up until the last electoral votes came in. Bob Shrum, a political science professor at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences and longtime political consultant, explained his concerns when Donald Trump gripped 244 electoral votes.“At the beginning of the day, they said it would take a miracle for Donald Trump to win,” Shrum said. “At this point it would take a miracle for Hillary Clinton to win. She is losing states Democrats almost always carry.”It was a miracle that never came.Near 11:30 p.m. PST, Trump was able to win the state of Wisconsin and garner 276 total electoral votes, six votes more than the necessary number to be president. Shortly afterward, Clinton called Trump to concede the election.The results garnered mixed feelings in students watching the votes come in.Doctoral student Erica Silva met the results with uneasiness, especially in contrast to the optimism expressed in the 2008 and 2012 elections.“My freshman year, we watched Obama win the election, and the mood on campus was one of joy and hope,” Silva said. “Right now I think that the mood here is one of despair, one of shock, one of disbelief. We’re not really sure what’s going on.”Conservative voices were also present. Diego Hernandez, a sophomore majoring in physics, said that he was overjoyed and relieved by the prospect of a Trump presidency.“I think it [is] a very trying time for Americans, so in a sense I’m a relieved that Hillary didn’t win, mainly because of Supreme Court nominations,” Hernandez said. “We need to keep a conservative majority on the court. I’m hoping [Trump] will be able to get the recipe of success right, but I think no matter what he does he will always be a step above Clinton.”Over the past several weeks, most major polls had predicted a Clinton victory. As of Tuesday morning, The New York Times gave Clinton an 84 percent chance of winning, though the Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Daybreak Poll stood out for its prediction of a Trump win.Students largely reflected this divide between the polling predictions and the actual results, expressing surprise and shock.“I did not expect this at all. I thought it would be a very easy win for Hillary,” said Thomas Demoner, a junior majoring in business administration with a concentration in cinematic arts. “I never really took Trump seriously. I’m a little embarrassed, [because] he’s definitely going to decay the country’s image.”Sophie Greensite, a junior majoring in economics, mirrored Demoner’s statements, especially in regard to the numerous swing states that Trump won.“I’m worried for our country,” Greensite said. “Trump just instills such a divisive rhetoric in people, and I don’t stand for anything that he says. I think that he’s only going to serve to further separate our nation.”Ted Steinberg, a junior majoring in policy, planning and development, said that he accepts the results of the election despite being taken aback by them.“I am shocked but also somewhat ashamed that I’m shocked,” Steinberg said. “We always hear that the polls aren’t 100 percent, and here we are trusting the polls a little too much, in part out of a cautious optimism that I guess came around and bit us.”Senate results were announced on Tuesday night as well, with Republicans winning 51 seats and Democrats winning 47, leaving a Republican majority. The House of Representatives also maintained its Republican majority, with 235 seats announced to the Democrats’ 185.Nitika Johri, a senior majoring in cognitive science, said that the advent of a Republican president coupled with a Republican majority in Congress was extremely concerning.“I’m feeling pretty disheartened and a little bit scared,” Johri said. “A Trump presidency is scary enough, but what’s scary to me is also having Republicans hold the House and the Senate and what is going to happen with the Supreme Court justices. I feel scared not only for myself as a colored female, but I feel scared for a lot of the people who have expressed interest in being Democrats or being progressive.”last_img read more

Opponent preview: What to know about the Pittsburgh Panthers

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Syracuse snapped its losing streak with a 79-72 win over Georgia Tech last Saturday, the first win in four games for the Orange. On Wednesday, Syracuse (15-12, 8-8 Atlantic Coast) will look for a second-straight victory when it travels to Pittsburgh for a 7 p.m. tip-off. The Panthers (15-13, 6-11) enter Wednesday following a three-point home loss to Virginia last Saturday and have lost their last four in a row. Below is the Pittsburgh scouting report before Wednesday night’s tipoff.All-time series: Syracuse leads, 72-45Last time they played: The Orange jetted out to a 20-point lead over the Panthers in the first half before hanging on for a 69-61 win. The Pittsburgh offense appeared puzzled early in the game and failed to break through Syracuse’s 2-3 zone defense. As the game carried on, Syracuse’s offense struggled too. Joe Girard III finished the game having shot 25% from the field while the ACC’s leading-scorer Elijah Hughes had just 10 points. Leading the Orange’s forward group was Marek Dolezaj with 17 points and seven rebounds, while Quincy Guerrier added 10 points and eight rebounds. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe Pitt report: Pittsburgh has lost its last four games and has scored more than 60 points in just one of those matchups. Its field goal percentages both inside and beyond the arc rank in the bottom 300s nationally, including a 29.2% 3-point field goal percentage.  Outside of a high forced turnover rate, not much on the Panthers stat sheet jumps off the page. No player averages more than 12.3 points per game and Pitt lacks a dominant down-low presence. It’s the exact opposite of the formula that’s beaten down on Syracuse this year.How Syracuse beats Pitt: Syracuse beats Pittsburgh by playing the first half it did a few weeks ago. The Orange forced the Panthers to shoot outside jumpers and scored from all over the floor through the first 20 minutes. If Buddy Boeheim didn’t cool off after an 18-point first half Syracuse may have ran away with that game. Syracuse’s offense hasn’t been a major issue over the last few games and shouldn’t be on Wednesday night either. The Orange needs their usual contributors to play well and they can waltz away from Pittsburgh with an easy win.Stat to know: 34 — With a 34% offensive rebounding percentage, Pittsburgh ranks 342nd worst in the country. KenPom odds: Syracuse has a 49% chance to win the game, with a projected final score of 70-69 in favor of Pittsburgh.Player to watch: Justin Champagnie, guard No. 11The freshman from Brooklyn leads Pittsburgh in points (12.3) and rebounds (7.1) per game. At 6-foot-6, Champagnie plays a guard-forward hybrid and could end up across Hughes for parts of the game. If Pitt wins on Wednesday, watch for a dominant double-double from Champagnie.  Comments Published on February 26, 2020 at 12:37 am Contact Josh: jlschafe@syr.edu | @Schafer_44last_img read more