NEWS SCAN Special Edition: MRSA in healthcare settings

first_imgMar 25, 2009 – The annual meeting of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America took place Mar 20-22 in San Diego. This News Scan Special Edition surveys a selection of the abundant research from that meeting on combating MRSA in healthcare institutions.’Positive Deviance’ makes difference in reducing MRSA ratesThree hospitals and healthcare systems in different parts of the United States significantly reduced their in-house transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by mounting a multi-pronged prevention effort of active surveillance, hand hygiene, and contact precautions. A key to the program’s success was “Positive Deviance,” an organizational technique that identifies personnel who are good problem solvers and keeps their ideas from being stifled by custom and hierarchy. The trial, co-sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Plexus Institute, reduced MRSA incidence in the hospitals by up to 62%.Invasive MRSA declining, may be due to hospital control effortsA CDC analysis of data from the Active Bacterial Core surveillance system, drawn from nine sites across the United States, shows that cases of invasive hospital-onset MRSA declined 16% from 2005 to 2007. Invasive cases that were due to hospital infection, but arose after discharge, declined 8.7%. In a related survey of 134 hospitals, almost all were deploying some MRSA-prevention measures out of a generally accepted menu of seven recommended practices, though no hospital was using all seven. The reduction in invasive MRSA may be linked to hospitals’ increased efforts.MRSA control in ICU leads to reductions throughout hospitalA MRSA-prevention campaign at the Billings Clinic, a 270-bed community hospital in Billings, Mont., demonstrated that limited control efforts may have broad reach. The hospital instituted active surveillance and hand hygiene in its 22-bed ICU and saw hospital-wide MRSA incidence fall from 1.2 cases per 1,000 patient-days to 0.27 per 1,000; reductions continued for 20 months.MRSA cases in hospitals may have been acquired in communityAn analysis of patients in a large Delaware healthcare system who were newly identified as having MRSA colonization shows that the vast majority of colonizations were not acquired during the hospital stay, but were present on admission. Only 13% were acquired in-hospital, suggesting that programs aimed at stopping hospital transmission could not have prevented them, and demonstrating that the complex epidemiology of MRSA in hospital and community is likely to complicate MRSA control.Community strains causing increasing number of hospital infectionsAt Stroger Hospital, the main public hospital for downtown Chicago, the incidence of hospital-associated bloodstream infections caused by MRSA has not changed significantly over 7 years. However, the proportion of those invasive infections caused by a community-genotype MRSA strain has more than doubled, from 32% of cases in 2000-2003 to 68% in 2004-2007.last_img read more

Janet Jackson declined to perform at Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

first_imgOn Friday night, pop icon, Janet Jackson was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall […]last_img

Student T-shirt company raises money for community

first_img“We really hope to just provide support to these businesses and say that even though we’re not on campus, and we’re not actually patronizing your store in person, we’re still here for you and we still appreciate what you’re doing for us as students,” Monro said. Monro said Fight Online is also currently creating a licensing agreement with the help of Wright and is considering donating to establishments depending on the number of students who visit.  Of the Fight Online duo, Fisher takes on the product design and development, using skills she accrued with her communication design minor. Monro handles the entrepreneurial side, working with mentors from the Marshall Career Advantage Mentor Program to help reach out to different offices on campus and to facilitate the growth of the business.  The duo named their clothing line Fight Online to commemorate USC’s transition to online learning. The business initially started with a playful intent. After realizing a deserted campus also meant that many local businesses near USC, including Caveman Kitchen and El Huero, were losing sources of revenue from student customers, they decided to refocus their work to provide financial support for local businesses. “What touched me about [Fight Online] was that recognition that our students are getting to know the local vendors,” Folt said. “They want to find a way to do something that I think is artistic and entrepreneurial.” For Folt, initiatives like Fight Online show how students respond to crises: by helping those around them.  Monro and Fisher received increased support after emailing President Carol Folt to see what avenues they could explore with their idea. Folt put them in contact with David Wright, senior vice president of administration, whose duties include overseeing the USC Bookstore, and Wright helped the pair sell more shirts and receive more donations by advertising the product on the USC Bookstore website and expediting the licensure process for the business.  “We wanted it to be really simple and sleek and not obnoxious or anything,” Monro said. “We found different design templates on the Bonfire website, and Fisher was able to put something together to make it look clean and sharp.” center_img Monro and Fisher originally spent a few days designing the T-shirts before working through Bonfire, a site that facilitates custom shirts for fundraising.   The brand has sold nearly  600 shirts through the Bonfire website and the USC Bookstore and continues to grow its customer base through social media and USC newsletters of organizations including the Blackstone Launchpad. Awaiting purchase money from Bonfire, the pair has yet to distribute financial proceeds to local businesses, including El Huero and 3 Brother’s Bike Shop.  With the coronavirus pandemic forcing institutions to postpone college milestones, including graduation, many students will instead spend the remainder of their spring semester indoors on Zoom. Seniors Claire Monro and Claire Fisher decided to commemorate their last semester at USC through their clothing business Fight Online while giving thanks to the local businesses that helped make their experience on campus worthwhile. “When we were thinking about who to donate to, we kept going back and forth thinking who really had an impact on our time at USC and it differed for every person we asked,” Monro said.  Fight Online, the brainchild of two Marshall School of Business seniors, launched last month. The founders, Claire Monro and Claire Fisher, said they wanted to raise money for businesses that made their time at USC memorable. (Photo courtesy of Fight Online) “I think they were able to double the amount of money that they could actually donate because they got to work in partnership with the bookstore,” Folt said. “It’s one of those things that people want to help each other. It’s just so touching to me that everybody that writes to me seems to want to help somebody else and so whenever I can help someone help someone else, I’m finding that’s something that I really want to do.” last_img read more