Gov. Wolf: Masks Help Stop the Spread of COVID-19

first_img June 23, 2020 Gov. Wolf: Masks Help Stop the Spread of COVID-19 Press Release,  Public Health Governor Tom Wolf today noted that research confirms the importance of wearing masks to stop the spread of COVID-19 and that Pennsylvanians are required to wear masks when entering any business in all counties in both yellow and green phases of reopening.“As most counties are in or will soon be in the green phase of reopening, mask-wearing is a vital measure to help stop the spread of COVID-19,” Gov. Wolf said. “Pennsylvania has emerged as a leader among states for reduced cases amid increased reopening and we want that to continue to keep people safe and healthy while returning to many of the activities we enjoyed before COVID.”The mask requirement is part of Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel’s Levine’s order, “Directing Public Health Safety Measures for Businesses Permitted to Maintain In-person Operations,” which pertains to all counties regardless of the phase of reopening. The order requires businesses to enforce mask-wearing unless someone has an underlying health condition that prevents them from wearing a mask. Children two or younger are not required to wear masks.According to a recent study in the Institute of Physics, wearing simple medical masks or improvised facial coverings reduces community exposures from asymptomatic, but unknowingly infectious, individuals.The study concludes that while people may perceive them to be ineffective or burdensome to wear, “wearing some form of exhaled barrier (mask) out in public during pathogen outbreaks is an altruistic act serving not only as a form of enhanced cough or sneeze etiquette, but also to reduce the aerosols emitted from normal breathing or when talking. Without daily testing, nobody can be certain that they are not an asymptotic disease vector. Scientifically, this is a positive step towards helping combat the current COVID-19 pandemic.”U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams took to twitter on Sunday to advise that mask-wearing is contributing to and not infringing on freedom, tweeting in part, “Some feel face coverings infringe on their freedom of choice- but if more wear them, we’ll have MORE freedom to go out.”In addition to mask wearing, Gov. Wolf and Sec. of Health Dr. Rachel Levine have advised that robust testing and contact tracing in green counties are keys to safe, phased reopening.The state continues to increase testing and ramp up contact-tracing efforts. As of June 18 (the most recent data available), there are a total of 518 contact tracers, and a total of 4,161 contacts being monitored.The Department of Health received a total of 89,350 test results in the past seven days, an average of 12,764 a day. The 30-day average of test results received is more than 13,934.There were 2,763 total cases added to investigations for the week of June 12 through 18.“Mask-wearing needs to be a part of our everyday routines,” Gov. Wolf said. “When you leave the house, grab your keys, your wallet and your mask. Mask-wearing has proven to be an important deterrent to the spread of the virus and keeping Pennsylvanians safe and healthy is the goal as we reopen and continue our mitigation efforts.”The state’s business guidance outlines mask-wearing requirements and additional safety parameters for both employees and customers.Read more on Gov. Wolf’s Process to Reopen PA here.Ver esta página en español.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Parents have financially stepped in becoming the fifth biggest lender to first home buyers

first_imgRay White Queensland CEO, Tony Warland said parents wanted to help secure their children’s future and they thought helping buy property could do that.Mr Warland said this could help them grow their wealth to get a more substantial deposit together to buy a home they would like to live in.”“There is nothing more rewarding than seeing children entering into their first property investment whether it be a home or investment it is wanting to secure a future for them.’’The research found the most common way that parents helped was allowing their children to live rent free in their home and contributing money toward a deposit.Some acted as a guarantor, helped with repayments or bought as a partner with their children.About 9 per cent of parents delayed their retirement in order to help their children out and 4 per cent said they would sell some assets. Kirsty Lamont of Mozo said parents realised it was hard for their children to save enough for a deposit on their own.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor1 hour agoMs Lamont said this could be because parents realised it was just too hard for young people to pull the money together to service a mortgage and pay them back.She said not all parents were contributing money but many were doing what they could to help including allowing their children to move back home rent free, so they could save.The research found 29 per cent of Australian families offered financial assistance to their children with the average amount being $64,206.“For many first home buyers, house prices around Australia can be absolutely daunting. It can take years to scrimp and save for a home deposit, all the while house prices continue to skyrocket, becoming increasingly inaccessible,’’ she said.Ray White Queensland CEO, Tony Warland said it was something he had seen in past years with families of different cultural backgrounds but now it had become more widespread.He said it wasn’t always cash but often it could be offering their own property as equity.“I would say that a lot of family members are helping their children not necessarily into homes (to live in) but also to get into an investment property.’’ Parents have become major lenders to their children trying to get into the property market.ALMOST a third of home buyers have to rely on money from their parents to buy their own home with Queensland mums and dads digging deep.According to research by financial comparison website Mozo this makes the “Bank of Mum and Dad’’ the fifth biggest mortgage lender in Australia, behind the big four banks.And it appears the Bank of Mum and Dad are a generous bunch with 67 per cent not expecting to be repaid.New research by Mozo revealed Queensland parents kicked in on average $44,694 to help their children into the property market.Nationally parents had contributed $65.3 billion to their children to buy their first property.The research asked parents how they helped their children and if they did how much they contributed.Mozo director, Kirsty Lamont, said it showed the many first home buyers were unable to independently take their first step onto the property ladder.“I think it was certainly surprising that the Bank of Mum and Dad is such a major lender in the property market,’’ she said.“I think it is really interesting that the fact that many parents don’t expect their kids to repay them financially.’’last_img read more

LNG bunkering barge studied for Port of Venice

first_imgImage courtesy of Port of VeniceIn cooperation with the towing company, Rimorchiatori Riuniti Panfido the Northern Adriatic Sea Port Authority is looking into the possibility of developing an LNG bunkering barge that would be based at the Venice LNG terminal. The international regulations coming into force in 2020 with the global sulphur content of marine fuels to be capped at 0.5 percent have increased interest in liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a marine fuel.Italy passed a legislative in January 2017 aiming to reduce the country’s dependency on oil and the negative effects from the transport sector and that an adequate number of LNG bunkering infrastructure is installed in the Italian ports by 2025.Market players planning on implementing the legislature have been supported by Italy’s ministry of economic development that has already established the legal framework for the infrastructure development.According to the port of Venice, demand for liquefied natural gas by 2030 could reach 873,000 tons per year 19.7 percent of which will be dedicated to marine transport with the majority being used up by road transport (73 percent).The project has received European Union’s backing through the GAINN4MOS project that aims to improve the Motorways of the Sea network in six of the project member states including Spain, France, Croatia, Italy, Portugal and Slovenia. The construction of the LNG terminal in the port of Venice is also in line for EU funding through its Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) as well as the European Investment Bank (EIB).last_img read more

DPS plans new changes for the spring semester

first_imgThe Dept. of Public Safety has undergone some dramatic changes in the past year and officers say the rebranding will continue.Patrol scooter · A Dept. of Public Safety officer’s T-3 motion vehicle parked in front of the Ostrow School of Dentistry on Wednesday. – Joseph Chen | Daily TrojanBeginning Jan. 1, all armed DPS officers — those who are Police Academy-trained and can issue arrests — will begin wearing blue uniforms rather than the tan and green ones the department currently dons.John Thomas, who will mark the end of his first year as DPS chief this January, said blue uniforms are standard for law-enforcement agencies and thus easier to order. They also help create uniformity within the department and will feature an official USC Dept. of Public Safety patch as opposed to the current uniforms, which feature the university seal.“It’s really hard to get consistency when you have a two tone uniform with the green and the tan,” Thomas said. “One of the things that was important to me was that we as a department be perceived by students and the community in a more professional manner and I wanted to rebrand the department in such a way where when people see DPS officers they’re not seeing what they’ve become accustomed to because we’re going in a new and better direction, trying to be more customer-focused and community-oriented.”As part of his efforts to shift the role of DPS in the community, Thomas chose to add more supervisory personnel administrative staff and create two deputy chief positions at the beginning of this academic year.“When I was selected as chief, one of the things that was clear to me was that we needed to reorganize the department, but also in that reorganization we needed to add more administrative support and more supervisory oversight to our officers working in the field to provide,” Thomas said. “We want a better quality product for the people that we serve, which is primarily students.”Deputy chief John Adams previously worked at UCLA before beginning at USC this fall. Adams has worked closely with leadership on The Row to ensure that students safely engage in recreational activities and make an effort to drink responsibly. Adams meets with leadership from the Greek community every Monday to debrief and review incident logs from the previous week.“When I came on board, I saw the issue and went directly to those leaders in that area to talk with them on a regular basis and it’s worked out very well,” Adams said. “We have a nice mutually collaborative environment. I can get their opinions and bring them back to the chief.”With input from student groups, Thomas and Adams came up with the idea of a party response car, which is currently a group of three officers tasked with responding to all calls about parties or noise complaints.“We have designated these as the officers we expect are going to build a relationship [with students],” Thomas said. “They are going to be the ones that respond to noise complaints and loud music complaints and all those other issues so that students get used to dealing with the same individuals.”Thomas also emphasized the need to work with students on future measures.“The only way we’re going to be successful in this is if we put together policies that have student input,” Thomas said. “Students made it very clear that the administration can put together policies but if [students] don’t have a buy-in and it doesn’t make sense to them and it’s not collaborative, students are just going to find a way to go around it. We don’t want that — we want it to be successful, we want students to have a buy-in and a sense of knowing that we appreciate an respect their input.”Deputy Chief David Carlisle, a past captain of DPS, assumed his new position as part of the reorganization at the beginning of the school year. Carlisle said that this fall’s Thursday night football game — the first non-Thanksgiving regular season Thursday game in USC history — proved how out-of-hand parties can get when students do not comply with university policies.“The need for those types of dialogues and the improvement in policies and relationships was emphasized on our first Thursday night home game where the university said there would be no tailgating and yet there was unlimited tailgating on The Row,” Carlisle said. “It pointed out the fact that sometimes the message isn’t getting across and how things can get out of control in regards to obeying the rules of conduct here at the university.”Now that football season is over, however, officers will no longer be responsible for managing thousands of non-USC students on campus, in the Coliseum and in the surrounding neighborhoods. Thomas said he suspects and hopes that there will be fewer parties and alcohol transports in the spring semester. In this case, DPS could use its resources elsewhere, such as through adding another officer to the party response team or preparing more for spring events.“We immediately see students are buckling down and are more focused in a lot of ways toward what they have to do to graduate,” Thomas said. “But it’s busy for us on another front because we have to start planning for commencement and [the Los Angeles Times] Festival of Books and the Special Olympics this summer.”Though several large events are slated for spring, DPS has also seen an unusually large number of high-profile guests this fall, including former President George W. Bush, first lady Laura Bush, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Gen. David Petraeus, all of whom required increased security and collaboration with federal officers.Moving forward, DPS must also find a way to adapt to USC’s continuing plan for expansion of the university’s properties. USC recently acquired the Verdugo Hills Hospital in the Glendale area. Now, the hospital is looking to USC for public safety services in an area don’t they normally respond to.“That is a challenge in terms of personnel and in terms of communication such as radios,” Carlisle said. “As [USC] expands so may DPS’ role in providing the same level of service to those far away facilities.” Follow Kate on Twitter @km_guarinolast_img read more