MAN CHARGED WITH ASSAULT OVER ST PATRICK’S NIGHT ATTACK

first_imgThe scene of the attack in FalcarraghA MAN has been charged tonight with assault following an attack in Falcarragh on St Patrick’s night.The man will appear at Letterkenny court on Wednesday morning. He was charged by Gardai in Glenties investigating an attack on Patrick McLaughlin, the 47-year-old assaulted outside Flynn’s Bar in Falcarragh at around 12.30am on Monday.Mr McLaughlin remains in a critical condition in the Beaumont Hospital in Dublin where he is in a coma.Members of his family are at his bedside.The man charged with assault will appear at Falcarragh District Court sitting in Letterkenny at 10.30am tomorrow.A second man arrested by Gardai investigating the attack is still being questioned at Milford garda station.MAN CHARGED WITH ASSAULT OVER ST PATRICK’S NIGHT ATTACK was last modified: March 19th, 2013 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:MAN CHARGED WITH ASSAULT OVER ST PATRICK’S NIGHT ATTACKlast_img read more

John Downey should be at home with his family – Deputy Pearse Doherty

first_imgDonegal Sinn Féin TD Pearse Doherty has described the British extradition request of John Downey request as vindictive and of bad faith.Deputy Doherty was responding to the Creeslough man’s extradition to the UK after he handed himself over to Gardai.Mr Downey is wanted by prosecutors in Northern Ireland over the murders of two Ulster Defence Regiment soldiers in 1972.  Deputy Doherty said “The allegations against John Downey have already been dealt with and the British Government publicly stated that he is not wanted in connection with any offence.“That assertion was tested in the courts and he was subsequently released. That judgement should be respected by the British authorities.“The extradition request from the British Authorities is vindictive and bad faith and is an attempt to overturn due process.“It follows a campaign to introduce an amnesty for British soldiers at a time when the spotlight is on them for their actions. “John Downey is a supporter of the peace process over many years and to his extradition is vindictive and an act of bad faith.“He has worked to promote peace and reconciliation between the people of this island, meeting with members of Loyalism and Unionism and trying to put the past behind us and move into the future in peace together.“John Downey should be at home tonight with his family in Donegal.  The British authorities through their own courts were ordered to release John after they were found guilty of a breach of process when he was previously arrested and detained a number of years ago. I have no doubt that the same will happen again.” John Downey should be at home with his family – Deputy Pearse Doherty was last modified: October 11th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalextraditionJohn DowneyPearse Dohertylast_img read more

NASA Commemorates Apollo 8 Genesis Reading

first_imgA major event for the 50th Anniversary of Apollo didn’t shy away from the historic Bible reading from the moon.Before reading our reaction to the NASA Event “The Spirit of Apollo” (Dec 11), watch Illustra’s video “Merry Christmas from the Moon” to see what was the centerpiece of Apollo 8:Merry Christmas from the Moon from The John 10:10 Project on Vimeo.Tuesday night December 11th, 2018, The Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum, in cooperation with NASA, held a commemoration of Apollo 8 at the National Cathedral in Washington DC. This was one of several major events for the 50th Anniversary of Apollo. Some consider Apollo 8 an even more significant historic event than the actual moon landing 7 months later (Apollo 11’s anniversary will be celebrated in July, 2019). You will see why in the statements below.Here are some comments from the event written in real time as the event took place. The program notes say,Apollo 8 was the first human mission to the Moon, and its crew were the first people to see the far side with their own eyes. The mission’s dramatic highlights included a live Christmas Eve broadcast during which the astronauts read verses from the Book of Genesis in lunar orbit, and the iconic Earthrise photo, which stunned the world with the beauty and isolation of our home in the cosmos.The evening’s speakers, including Apollo 8 astronaut Jim Lovell and Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church Michael Curry, will celebrate that moment of unity and the spiritual meaning of exploration embodied by the first flight to the Moon. A dramatic choral performance will recreate the famous Christmas Eve Broadcast. Apollo 8 challenged our understanding of human limitations. Fifty years later, we come together to honor the Spirit of Apollo.[Note: This is a summary, not a transcript. Quotations may not be exact due to rapid transcription in real time. Check the playback for actual quotes.]19:50 Music from Holst’s The Planets is playing (Mars, the Bringer of War and Venus, the Bringer of Peace) before the start of the program.20:00 Camera zooms in on the National Cathedral interior.20:02 The Very Reverend Randy Hollerith, Dean of Washington National Cathedral, calls Earth “God’s gracious gift.” Mentions that a piece of moon rock from Apollo is embedded in the cathedral’s “Space Window.”20:07 Ellen R. Stofan, PhD, recalls how NASA only told Commander Borman to ‘Do something appropriate‘ – so they read the creation story from the book of Genesis. For man’s new future in space, “they went back to the beginning.” Upon hearing the story of Genesis on Christmas Eve, even the flight engineers wept. Stofan mistakenly says twice that a million people were watching (it was more like a billion). She speculates on “What will be the reaction when we discover life?”20:13 Multimedia film “The Firmament” with choir and orchestra. Playback of impressions of the moon’s appearance by the astronauts. Choir interlude. Genesis reading played in its entirety, with choir voices and orchestra bells behind, and photos of the astronauts who read it.18:20 The Most Reverend Michael B. Curry, Presiding Bishop and Primate of the Episcopal Church, reads the Genesis passage again to the point, “Let there be light!” Quotes a black Baptist preacher James Weldon Johnson, author of “God’s Trombone,” who preached on Genesis in the 1800s. Johnson’s poetic version begins, “And God stepped out on space, and said, “I’m lonely: I’ll make me a world.” Curry remarks, “It’s not about us. We are part of a greater world.” We were made for a relationship of God who created us, with one another, and with the world, because God created it and cares about it. “And if you don’t believe me, talk to Jesus!” He quotes John 3:16. God so loved “the cosmos” that Christmas happened. We were made for God, for each other, and for this whole creation. “He’s got the whole world in his hands” he repeats:  “He’s got you & me brother … sister … the little bitty baby in His hands. Curry recalls how in 1968, three human beings summoned great courage, with NASA technology. A quarter million miles from home—almost by accident—the astronauts saw something no human being had ever seen before. And when they read from Genesis, “I wonder if God kind of gave a cosmic smile, and He said, ‘Now y’all see what I see.’”  God whispered in their ears, “Behold the world, the world of which you are a part. Look at its symmetry. Look at its beauty. Look at its wonder. Behold your world.” Some have said that was a moment that changed human consciousness forever. The Earthrise has been called one of the 100 most impactful photographs in all of human history. The environmental movement had its inspiration from that photograph, and from the reading of Genesis. Rev. Curry ventures off into climate change for a minute or two. Apollo’s legacy, he remarks, is a call for re-dedication to fly to new worlds, to use the wisdom of science & technology to save this oasis. “Good night, good luck, merry Christmas to all of us on this good Earth.”  Curry ends by singing “He’s got the whole world in His hands,” inviting the audience to join in.Earthrise from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, December 201520:38 Film with astronauts commenting on Apollo, including Anders, Borman, Lovell in their senior years. Anders said that Frank had chosen to read the book of Genesis. It shocked people but really got their attention.  Borman called Apollo a “uniquely American program,” but adds that “we came for all mankind.” Anders remarked that they saw the Earth the size of your fist at arm’s length. “We came to discover the moon,” he said, “but what we really discovered was the Earth.”20:41 Jim Bridenstine, NASA Director, follows up on Rev Curry by saying “It’s absolutely true that God does hold the entire world in His hands.” He recounts the Apollo 1 disaster the previous year, and multiple failures in Apollo 6 in August 1968 (it wasn’t called a failure at the time). Apollo 8 was four months away, and not ready! One out of every four people on Earth tuned in to the broadcast to hear the astronauts read Genesis 1:1-10, including those in the Soviet Union, where Christmas was still illegal. Bridenstine shifts gears toward the future: “We are going forward to the moon,” he says, “to stay.” He announces goals for sustainable, reusable architecture, with commercial and international partners. “Today we heard the astronauts read from Genesis,” that there was a firmament in the heavens, which Bridenstine says represents empty space. There, the waters below the firmament were separated the waters above. People in 1968 believed the moon was bone dry. Now we know that there are hundreds of billions of tons of water ice on the surface of the moon, at the poles. This can provide rocket fuel and drinkable water. ‘Gateway’ will be a permanent command module able to ferry machines and astronauts to the surface of the moon and back. Open architecture means that any country will be able to see how we do it, including private individuals and commercial companies. Goals are to retire the risk, prove the technology, prove the capability, understand human physiology, and replicate as much as possible on our journey to Mars. Remarks again about the waters above and below the firmament. When our Apollo astronauts read that, they didn’t know water existed anywhere else. Now we know of oceans below Europa and 10 miles below Mars. Is there life on other worlds? We don’t know, but Mars has methane emissions that fluctuate with the seasons; also complex organic compounds. These are exciting times, Bridenstine says. They don’t guarantee life is on Mars, but are consistent with the possibility. Lovell’s words about waters above the firmament had very real meaning. NASA is following the water, discovering life. Bridenstine introduces Jim Lovell as one of his heroes, astronaut on Gemini 7 & 12, Apollo 8 and Apollo 13. Lovell comes up to the podium.“For the Beauty of the Earth” — our fragile planet seen from the Suomi NPP spacecraft, 201220:54  Lovell gets a standing ovation from the audience. He recounts the bad summer of 1968. Protests against an unpopular war, beginnings of a “metoo movement” with women burning their bras, and hippies on the rise. After Gemini, Lovell was looking forward to an Apollo flight, but the Apollo 1 disaster that killed three of his friends delayed the Apollo program for 10 months. Lovell describes Borman & Anders, his co-pilots. The Lunar Module, they learned, was not going to be ready. The US also gained intelligence that the Russians were planning a lunar flight before the year was out, after three successful unmanned flights in the Zond series, including one that flew around the moon. Zond 7 was being prepared for a manned flight in December. NASA official George Lowe had a brilliant idea, provided the Command Module were certified in October, to launch Apollo 8 to moon and go into lunar orbit. In addition to numerous scientific benefits, and opportunities to check the Apollo technologies, it would give America the uplift it needed. But they only had four months to prepare. The Saturn V booster still had problems. NASA officials would only approve the risky flight if Apollo 7 were successful. For Borman, the possibility answered his dream. Anders as disappointed, because as Lunar Module pilot he wouldn’t have a working LM. “I was delighted,” Lovell recalls, because it would be “a mini-Lewis and Clark Expedition” to go where others had not gone before. On Dec 21,in the early morning, as he watched the press vehicles, “Suddenly I realized I was going to the moon.” All that navigation training was for real. At 7:21, Apollo 8 launched. There was no sign of a Russian launch. The crew entered lunar orbit entered on dark side, and the moon was nowhere to be seen. Shards of sunlight illuminated craters 60 miles below as they approached lunar sunrise. “I was observing alive that part of the moon that had been hidden from man for millions of years. “Then looking up, I saw it” – the Earth, a blue and white ball 240,000 miles away. I thought, my world has always been only as far as I can see: the horizon, the walls of a building. Seeing Earth 240,000 miles, he recalls, “my world suddenly expanded to infinity.” He pressed his thumb up against the window, and it completely hid the earth. “Everything I knew was behind my thumb,” I thought. “I realized my home is a small planet, just a mere speck in our Milky Way galaxy, and lost to oblivion” in the universe. I began to question my own existence; how do I fit into the world I see? I remembered thinking, “I hope to go to heaven when I die.” I went to heaven when I was born, he says, reflecting on we live on a planet with all the essentials for life, around “a star just the right distance that caused life to evolve in the beginning,” he continues. “God gave mankind a stage upon which to perform. How the play ends is up to us.” By all means, the flight of Apollo 8 was a complete success. Orbiting the moon on Christmas provided the spiritual environment on which to inspire the world with the reading of Genesis. He mentions Apollo 13 in passing; “that’s another story,” he quips. In Apollo 8, the American public got the real gift. He recalls a telegram received by the crew: “Thanks: you save 1968.” When Lovell accompanied the aged Charles Lindbergh to launch of Apollo 11, looking back at Lindbergh’s perilous 34-hour flight from New York to Paris, Lindbergh remarked, “Apollo 11 will be quite an accomplishment, but your flight Apollo 8 from the earth to the moon, that’s the flight I will remember.” applause.Earthrise from Selene spacecraft (2007), envisioned through an Apollo-style porthole window.~18:05 Richard Attenborough film. He gives his thoughts: How isolated and lonely we are here on Earth. In Apollo 8, we had not lost our connection to the natural world; we had rediscovered it. Something extraordinary: a grand competition between Russia and the USA led to a grand discovery. Apollo 8 gave us the dawn of planetary awareness. 50 years later, we are at high noon. The discovery of Earth urges our responsibility to protect the Earth. That American inspiration united us, and assured us that any feasible goal is within our grasp. Let us always remember the moment we left Earth for the f1st time and discovered what is truly precious – all of us together on the good earth.18:09  Hollerith: God bless you, may He bless us and keep us, and may we always be reaching for the stars.If you missed the event, I recommend watching the recording at the Air & Space Museum website. There are some things we can complain about, as with any public “spiritual” event, but much of the program was reverent and inspiring. For instance, there was open acknowledgement of God as Creator – and not a distant Creator, but one who cares for us and for His world. The Darwin-only atheistic materialism normally fluent at NASA was notable for its absence. Also, there was no hint of syncretism, trying to include the gods of other religions with the Creator. No, this is the God of Genesis! And to have John 3:16 quoted in a NASA event may be historic.Also memorable are the impressions of James Lovell, now 90 years old, of that famous view of the Earthrise 50 years ago. It’s amazing to me that no one at NASA realized that opportunity in advance. The pressure of the space race may have caused them to overlook it. Lovell also recounted being struck by the bland, gray surface of the moon compared to the blue-and-white gem of the Earth, so small in the darkness that he could cover it with his thumb. The music, film clips and quotes did justice to the spiritual import of that flight. It was also a celebration of American ingenuity and risk taking. Bridenstine recounted how many things went wrong with the earlier Apollo tests and flights: the Apollo 6 Command Module’s engine, for instance, which would have to re-ignite half a dozen times for Apollo 8, failed to re-ignite once after its first use on Apollo 6 in August. Other mishaps he described made the decision to orbit the moon just four months later seem reckless, and yet the Americans did it, and that during a year of political turmoil and social upheaval. So many things that could have gone wrong did not. I like to think God helped. We can look back with pride and joy at that inspiring mission, and not have our Christmases forever after ruined by the thought of dead astronauts orbiting the moon in a tin can. Several of the speakers also mentioned the perfection of Earth for human habitation. We live on an ideal planet around an ideal star, suggesting that humans have significance despite being specks in a vast universe (see Illustra’s short film, “Pale Blue Dot“).Allow us to make one theological correction to Rev. Curry’s quote of James Weldon Johnson’s poem, that begins, “And God stepped out on space, and said, ‘I’m lonely. I’ll make me a world.’” Many of our readers know that God did not create because He was lonely. He is a Trinity, self-existing in eternal relationship, and did not need to create. Secondly, He didn’t step out on space, because space, time and matter were all part of creation: “In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth” (Genesis 1:1). God is transcendent above all space, time and matter. We don’t want to be nit-picking here; we realize that Johnson, a godly preacher, was doing poetry, not theology or science. In fact, Johnson’s poem has been used in dramatic readings for years at one of America’s fundamental colleges in the south, Bob Jones University. It works very well in that context. It is very inspiring if you don’t take it as a piece of systematic theology. Envision an old black preacher waxing eloquent about Genesis 1 in a poor black church many years ago, with exuberant joy from the pulpit and rousing “Amen”s from the congregation, and you will be blessed by the poem. Watch William Warfield recite it in this YouTube video.So we vote thumbs up on the NASA celebration of Apollo 8. Nevertheless, whenever there is a public display of spirituality, you have to take many statements with a grain of salt. Political correctness goes with the territory: human fault for climate change, the universal brotherhood of man, evolution (mentioned only briefly in passing), and the search for life on other worlds. Overall, though, it was unusual and praiseworthy to see a NASA event that (1) affirmed the God of Genesis with reverence, (2) made abundant use of the idea of a good Creation for a purpose, (3) spoke of the goodness and beauty of the Earth, (4) affirmed the spiritual value of the mission, and (5) mentioned Jesus and John 3:16, and (6) wished everyone a Merry Christmas. That was a really nice gift to the American people.As December 24 approaches, we encourage you to share Illustra Media’s “Merry Christmas from the Moon” on social media as widely as possible. Don’t wait; right now is the best time. (Visited 1,070 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Building up Momentum for Change

first_img7 December 2011Ten innovative projects which will help thousands of people across the world deal with climate change have been launched at COP 17 in Durban as the first platform of the UNFCCC’s Momentum for Change initiative.President Jacob Zuma, International Relations Minister COP 17 president Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon, and UNFCCC executive secretary Christiana Figueres launched the projects at an informal event on Tuesday.Zuma showed his lighter side by making a joke about people in KwaZulu-Natal thinking COP 17 was about police officers before delving into the importance of such projects.Focus on public-private partnershipsThere are two South African projects on the list: the Buffelsdraai Landfill Site Community Reforestation Project, where rural communities collect seed, grow trees and plant these in a degraded forest area; and the eMalahleni Reclamation Plant, which treats underground water for everyday usage.The first platform of the Momentum for Change initiative is supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and focuses on public-private partnerships, especially those that benefit the urban poor in developing countries.One project that stands out involves “solar bottle bulbs”, where a 1 litre soda bottle is filled with a solution of purified water and bleach. The bottle is inserted halfway through a hole drilled in the metal roof and its sides are sealed. The bottle then looks like a bulb through a sunroof and provides a good amount of light by deflecting sunlight into gloomy interiors.These are now used in Manila, providing light to almost 10 000 people.Enabling people to contribute in practical waysThe projects, Zuma said, made it possible for individuals and communities to contribute in a very practical way to the process of reducing emissions, adapting to climate change and improving their quality of life.“These are projects that give people access to energy while at the same time, saving water,” Zuma said. “These are the projects that protect our ecosystems and … improve our food and water security. These are the projects that can be scaled up, replicated, enhanced and further innovated.”Nkoana-Mashabane used her address to highlight the role of women in Africa when dealing with adaptation and mitigation for climate change.Implementation? Ask a woman!She asked for projects to bring change and impact on the lives of women. She said women should no longer have to walk long distances to fetch water or wood, which in turns causes harm to forests.She added, half jokingly, that when you wanted projects to be implemented, you should ask women to do them for you.Ban, a self-confessed champion of gender equality, challenged African men to do more on the continent to help cope with climate change.He said if sustainable development was to become a reality, issues around global health, water scarcity, food prices, poverty and gender inequality had to be addressed.He once again said leaders needed to look beyond their borders, because climate change impacts did not respect borders and affected both the rich and poor.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Nine labourers killed near Pune as tunnel lift cable snaps

first_imgAt least nine migrant labourers were killed after an elevator box being used for an under-construction tunnel plunged into the ground near Bhigwan in Pune district, 100 km from here.The incident occurred on Monday evening. The tragedy struck as the deceased were emerging from the underground tunnel aimed at linking the Nira and Bhima Rivers near Indapur Taluk. The deceased have been identified as Mukesh Maurya, Mukesh Kumar, Sushant Pandi, Sabinga Naidu, Avinash Reddy, Chhotu Gole, Surendra Yadav, Rahul Narute and Balram Suan.“The elevator carrying the workers and construction equipment plunged down at least 100 feet after the cable broke. We will be conducting a thorough probe into the tragedy,” said Inspector Neelkanth Rathod of the Bigwan police station.The State government has announced an ex gratia of ₹2 lakh to the kin of the deceased, informed State Water Resources Minister Girish Mahajan.The labourers were working on the project which involves the construction of a 24.8 km-long ‘Nira-Bhima Link -5’ underground tunnel which is to enable the waters of the Nira River to be linked to the Bima River Bhima in a bid to bring relief to parched districts in the State.last_img read more

U.P. municipal elections conclude, EC downplays allegations of malfunctioning EVMs

first_imgVoting for the third and final phase of the 2017 civic polls in Uttar Pradesh concluded on Wednesday with yet another round of malfunctioning EVMs and discrepancies in voter lists, leading to angry protests in several districts.The third phase, which covered 233 local bodies across 26 districts, however, registered an increase of 1.5% voting and touched 53%. The overall voting over the three phases was 52.5%, around six per cent increase from 2012.Complaints over EVM malfunctions and discrepancies in voter lists were received from several districts, including Bareilly, Bulandshahr, Auraiya, Jaunpur and Barabanki.Vijay Mishra, a resident of Bareilly, was frustrated after he found the wrong name listed on his address in the booth. “The address was correct but they listed the wrong name, some Radhelal Maurya instead of me,” said Mr. Maurya, adding that due to missing names only three out of his 30-member family were able to vote.Voters lathichargedIn Barabanki, voters faced similar issues and in ward 26 in Peer Batawan, police lathicharged people allegedly without provocation, breaking chairs and tables of polling agents, to disperse the crowd which had assembled to inquire about the lists.State Election Commissioner S.K. Agarwal said polling was conducted peacefully, even as he downplayed the incidents of malfunctioning EVMs, 27 on Wednesday, as normal. A total of 503 EVMs had to be replaced over the three phases, out of which 250 were in Lucknow itself.Mr. Agarwal said the figure of 503 was negligible compared to the total number of EVMs deployed by the SEC, 32,374.Counting will be held on December 1.last_img read more

Bula Choudhury seems all set to become a female Mark Spitz

first_imgBula Choudhury powers her way to a string of medals: Sensational debutWhen her frail, waif-like figure joined the line-up for the start of her first race, the 200 m butterfly, the general reaction bordered on sympathy. Her 34 kg weight contained in a 138 cm frame, Bula Choudhury, the 12-year-old,Bula Choudhury powers her way to a string of medals: Sensational debutWhen her frail, waif-like figure joined the line-up for the start of her first race, the 200 m butterfly, the general reaction bordered on sympathy. Her 34 kg weight contained in a 138 cm frame, Bula Choudhury, the 12-year-old entrant from West Bengal was dwarfed both literally and figuratively by her better-known and more experienced rivals.The sympathy, however, soon changed to grudging admiration, incredulity and, finally, elation as the tiny figure powered its way to a sensational record-shattering win in the event, lopping off as much as 9.6 seconds from the existing mark. No individual performer in the meet could better an existing mark by a wider margin.The general belief that Choudhury’s effort was a flash in the pool was soon dispelled as she followed up her first day’s performance with a string of medal-winning performances. On the second day of the six-day meet she added a silver medal in the 100m backstroke followed by a silver in the 800m freestyle, a bronze in the 200m medley, two more silvers in the 100m and 200m freestyle, a gold in the 100m butterfly and another silver in the 400m freestyle.Her final tally of eight medals and 43 points, five points more than closest rival Persis Madan, won her the best swimmer of the meet title and a place in Indian sporting history. Her sensational debut in the nationals, at the age of 12, is an all-time record in itself and guaranteed her a place in the relay quartet for the Brisbane Commonwealth Games as well as a prominent place on the list of Asiad probables. Says current coach Bernad Johnke: “Bula is far superior to the other 14 girls in my camp and easily the best potential in the country. She is at an early age when her body is not yet fully formed and so she can adapt better to techniques that will help improve her timings.”advertisementSelf-trained: Obviously, in that tiny frame, is a budding powerhouse, a bundle of talent, grit and going-for-gold determination. Incredibly enough, Choudhury is largely self-trained. The third of four children born to a petty trader (a wholesale dealer in combs), Bula took to water like the proverbial duck. At age six, she plunged into a local pond which became her future training ground and only graduated to the Ganges river nearby when she outgrew the pond.”Even now, she goes as often as possible to the river to swim,” says her proud mother, Bakul, who chaperons her on her various aquatic appearances. Bula’s potential and her young age make her the most exciting swimming prospect the country has had in decades. Now that she has joined the Asiad training camps and Johnke has taken her under his wing, she has the potential to develop into a champion, if not in the coming Asiad then in the next one in 1986 when she will be 16.Though not overawed by the adulation and her triumphs last fortnight, Bula still displays a childish naivety and a schoolgirlish air. That is hardly surprising considering she is still in the eighth standard at the Rajmohan Paul Balika Vidyalaya in Calcutta. When a sudden attack of fever sent her into hospital at the end of the Trial Games, and tragically aborted her hopes of accompanying the Indian team to Brisbane, she displayed more worry about what her school friends would say than disappointment at not being able to go. “I promised them I would make it to Brisbane and now how can I face them?” she wailed.Her talent, however, has earned her a Rs 900 Central Government scholarship which pays for her schooling and her training. What she has clearly lacked so far is a balanced and proper diet and expert guidance. Now that she has the benefit of both, Bula Choudhury seems all set to become a female Mark Spitz.last_img read more