Nine labourers killed near Pune as tunnel lift cable snaps

first_imgAt least nine migrant labourers were killed after an elevator box being used for an under-construction tunnel plunged into the ground near Bhigwan in Pune district, 100 km from here.The incident occurred on Monday evening. The tragedy struck as the deceased were emerging from the underground tunnel aimed at linking the Nira and Bhima Rivers near Indapur Taluk. The deceased have been identified as Mukesh Maurya, Mukesh Kumar, Sushant Pandi, Sabinga Naidu, Avinash Reddy, Chhotu Gole, Surendra Yadav, Rahul Narute and Balram Suan.“The elevator carrying the workers and construction equipment plunged down at least 100 feet after the cable broke. We will be conducting a thorough probe into the tragedy,” said Inspector Neelkanth Rathod of the Bigwan police station.The State government has announced an ex gratia of ₹2 lakh to the kin of the deceased, informed State Water Resources Minister Girish Mahajan.The labourers were working on the project which involves the construction of a 24.8 km-long ‘Nira-Bhima Link -5’ underground tunnel which is to enable the waters of the Nira River to be linked to the Bima River Bhima in a bid to bring relief to parched districts in the State.last_img read more

Three militants killed in an encounter in Jammu and Kashmir’s Anantnag

first_imgSecurity forces killed three militants, including Tehreek-ul-Mujahideen Srinagar district commander Muhammad Ehsan Fazili alias Eesa, in Anantnag on Sunday night.Amid violent protests, the authorities placed parts of Srinagar and south Kashmir under security restrictions. Educational institutions were closed and exams cancelled. Train services were suspended.Police said, Fazili and two others were killed during a search operation.The police identified the second slain militant as Syed Owais, an affiliate of the Hizbul Mujahideen, and a resident of Kokernag. “The identify of the third is being ascertained,” the police said adding that arms and ammunition, including AK-47 rifles, pistols, hand grenades were recovered from the encounter site.Fazili, a student of Bachelor of Technology of Baba Ghulam Shah University, had joined the militants in September last year and “was involved in a recent attack on a police guard post at Soura, in which one police constable was killed”, said the spokesman.The policeman’s killing was also claimed by the Islamic State-affiliated news magazine ‘Amaq’, fuelling speculation about local militants’ links with the group.Violent protestsViolent protests broke out as hundreds of locals participated in the funeral prayers of Fazili and Owais in Srinagar and Kokernag.The protesters raised green and black flags. A few protesters unfurled the IS flags in the procession held for Fazili. They chanted pro-azadi and pro-militant slogans. Security forces used smoke shells to control the situation.Clashes spread in large parts of Srinagar. Several vehicles were damaged by the stone-throwing protesters. Most offices and business centres also remained closed.Top separatist leaders, including Syed Ali Geelani, Mirwaiz Umar Farooq and Yasin Malik, were placed under house arrest.last_img read more

a month ago​Arsenal boss Emery lauds ‘humble’ Gabriel Martinelli

first_img​Arsenal boss Emery lauds ‘humble’ Gabriel Martinelliby Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal manager Unai Emery was full of praise for Gabriel Martinelli after his performance against Nottingham Forest.The youngster was one of several fringe players who got a chance in the Carabao Cup game, which Arsenal won 5-0.And Martinelli was singled out for praise by Emery in his post-match comments to the club’s official website.Emery said: “Martinelli is a very young player. But he came here and we were waiting and watching him, how he could improve with us and really, really in the pre-season he played very well. “He was working in each training with a big spirit and with a big performance and I spoke with him to have some passion for when he gets his opportunity to play, to do like he was doing in the training and the matches in the pre-season. Tonight he did that. “Really, he deserved it because he is very humble, a humble player and he fights, he is hungry to have that opportunity to help us and really it was perfect, his work tonight.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

15 days agoMan Utd to try again for Benfica defender Ruben Dias

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man Utd to try again for Benfica defender Ruben Diasby Paul Vegas15 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United are ready to try again for Benfica defender Ruben Dias.United may have to splurge up to £80million to prise the 22-year-old away from the Portuguese capital, says The Sun.They made moves for the Portugal international in the summer but missed out.Now with Benfica set to offer the centre-back improved terms, his release clause will rise dramatically from £60m.Benfica are desperate to keep hold of their star man and are believed to be willing to pay him big money in a new deal.But the lure of Manchester United could prove tough to resist for the player. last_img

Stena Line Lays Keel for New RoPax Ship

first_imgChina’s shipbuilder AVIC Weihai Shipyard has held a keel-laying ceremony for a new RoPax vessel being built for Swedish ferry company Stena Line.The traditional maritime event, which took place on February 2, 2018, marks the start of the construction phase of the hull and the exterior parts of the vessel.“This is an important milestone in our exciting new ship building project,” Niclas Mårtensson, CEO Stena Line, said.Stena Line’s new RoPax vessels will be deployed on the Irish Sea. The new vessels, which will be 50% bigger than today’s standard RoPax units, have a planned delivery timetable during 2019 and 2020.“Our overall target is that these vessels will be the absolute state-of-the-art when it comes to energy efficiency, flexibility and customer service. In particular, we are placing heavy emphasis on developing a range of exciting new digital features which will provide our customers with unique additional services connected with their journey as well as developing a new, integrated digital onboard experience,” Mårtensson added.Featuring a length of 214.5 meters and a breadth of 27.8 meters, the new ships are capable of carrying 1,000 passengers.Image Courtesy: Stena Linelast_img read more

Vodafone Germany has added white label smart TV an

first_imgVodafone Germany has added white label smart TV and OTT specialist NetRange’s smart TV portal to its TV offering.Vodafone has integrated NetRange’s portal in its TV user interface and has made access to NetRange’s on-demand services available free of charge to its customers via its TV Center boxes.“Vodafone ranges among the top brands worldwide and is therefore one of our most prestigious customers. Again, we can prove that we fulfill the highest demands of our customers concerning the quality of service”, said Jan Wendt, CEO of NetRange.last_img

Skybacked US settop box startup Caavo is due

first_imgSky-backed US set-top box start-up, Caavo, is due to launch the first 5,000 units of its unified home entertainment box this autumn.Caavo first unveiled its set-top box design at the Code Media conference in California in February, and the launch follows two-years of development and beta testing for the product.The San Francisco Bay Area-headquartered company aims to connect pay TV, streaming, and gaming in one box, which can be operated using a single remote control.Caavo was co-founded in 2015 by late Slingbox founder Blake Krikorian and tech veterans Andrew Einaudi, Ashish Aggarwal and Vinod Gopinath.Einaudi is company CEO and previously worked at Microsoft on the Xbox team that launched the Xbox One.Krikorian died unexpectedly last year aged 48. He first developed the Slingbox TV streaming media device with his brother Jason Krikorian in 2002 and sold the business to Echostar in 2007.Sky invested US$2 million (€1.8 million) in Caavo last year while the company was still a stealth startup that described itself as “the missing link between your TV and you”.Caavo is one of a number of media and technology startups that the European pay TV operator has backed in recent years, alongside the likes of eSports broadcaster Ginx TV, French over-the-top TV platform Molotov, IP streaming service provider Roku, and cinematic VR company Jaunt.last_img read more

I have a far more reasonable number of stories tod

first_img I have a far more reasonable number of stories today—and I’m sure you’re happy about that.  I know I am. JPMorgan’s short market corners of 20% in COMEX gold and 35% in COMEX silver of a year ago—and the bank’s 21% long market corner in COMEX gold currently—meet or exceed the market shares held in the previous manipulations. On that basis alone, the CFTC should be prosecuting JPMorgan today. The Sumitomo copper trader who manipulated the market was known as “Mr. 5%” for his share of the market. Shouldn’t JPMorgan be referred to as Mr. 20% or Mr. 35%? – Silver analyst Ted Butler: 08 February 2014 Despite the fact that gold and silver finished in the plus column again yesterday, it was obvious that all four precious metals ran into sellers of last resort at 11 a.m. Hong Kong time—and then again between 8 and 9:15 a.m. in New York.  This isn’t rocket science, as all one has to do is give a cursory glance at all four precious metal charts posted at the top of this column—as the chart data speaks for itself. But it was another amazing day for the precious metal equities.  I must admit that I was taken aback by the strong showing yesterday, the third day in a row of big gains on less-than-impressive price performance—especially in silver.  From it’s low of last Thursday, the HUI has gained a bit over 10%.  Here’s the 5-day chart. Sponsor Advertisement Looking at the 3-year HUI chart, you can see that the last three days of gains have put the RSI trace very close to the overbought level, which is a situation that hasn’t existed since back in September 2012.  And it’s also self-evident, that we have miles to go to get back to anywhere near where the precious metal stocks were trading in 2011. Platinum and palladium had similar days, with the outstanding feature being the same engineered price decline as gold and silver—and during precisely the same times.  Nothing free market about these, either.  Here are the charts. Nothing happens to precious metal prices without their consent The gold price opened flat in New York on Monday evening, but around 8:30 a.m. Hong Kong time a rally began that got capped at 11 a.m. Hong Kong time right on the button.  From there it chopped sideways—and volume was pretty heavy by the time I hit the send button on yesterday’s column at 5:30 a.m. EST, which was 10:30 a.m. in London. Then shortly before 1 p.m. GMT, the gold price rallied a few dollars—and at 1 p.m. GMT the gold price, along with the other three precious metals, got sold off in unison, with the low tick in all four coming at 9:15 a.m. EST in New York.  The subsequent rally in gold topped out/got capped shortly after 11:30 a.m. in New York—and the price traded flat for the remainder of the day. The CME Group recorded the low and high ticks at $1,273.50 and $1,294.40 in the April contract. Gold closed the Tuesday session at $1,290.90 spot, up $15.90 on the day.  Volume, net of February and March, was very decent at 161, 000 contracts. [Note: You may notice that there is a discrepancy in the daily percentage gains between the Intraday Silver Sentiment Index chart—and the Long-Term Intraday Silver 7 Index chart posted above.  Nick uses two different data sets to produce each chart.  The intraday data comes from Yahoo quotes—and is computed from that.  The info on the second chart is taken from the end-of-day open, high, low, and closing data, which is not always the same.  “So the intraday data is always just a whisker off.“—as Nick puts it. – Ed] The CME’s Daily Delivery Report for Tuesday showed that 36 gold and 1 lonely silver contract were posted for delivery tomorrow within the Comex-approved depositories.  Canada’s Bank of Nova Scotia, HSBC USA and Barclays were the largest movers and shakers in what little delivery action there was.  The link to yesterday’s Issuers and Stoppers Report is here. There were deposits in both GLD and SLV yesterday.  In GLD, an authorized participant added 57,839 troy ounces of gold—and in SLV, there were 1,442,970 troy ounces added, which was within a hundred ounces of what was withdrawn from that ETF last Friday. The good folks over at the shortsqueeze.com Internet site updated their short positions for both GLD and SLV [as of January 31] late yesterday evening EST—and here’s what they had to report.  The short position in SLV fell by a very decent 15.50% —and is now down to 16.47 million ounces/shares held short, or 512 tonnes of the stuff. But the drop in GLD was a shocker, as the short position there fell by a very chunky 29.15% —and is now down to 12.54 million shares, or 1.254 million troy ounces, or 37 metric tonnes. These are very impressive numbers—and I know that Ted Butler will be a happy camper when he sees them this morning—and will certainly have something to say about it in his mid-week commentary to his paying subscribers later today.  The fact that the short positions in both these ETFs declined so significantly in the face of flat gold prices and falling silver prices during the 2-week reporting period, is very bullish. The U.S. Mint had another sales report yesterday.  They sold 1,000 troy ounces of gold eagles—500 one-ounce 24K gold buffaloes—and 249,500 silver eagles. Over at the Comex-approved depositories, they didn’t receive any gold, but did ship out 26,858 troy ounces—all of it from Scotia Mocatta’s warehouse.  The link to that activity is here. In silver, they reported receiving 277,845 troy ounces—and shipped out 7,000 ounces of the stuff.  Most of the receipts went into Scotia Mocatta’s vault.  The link to that action is here. Here’s a chart that Nick Laird sent around late yesterday evening MST—and it doesn’t require any further explanation from me, or anyone else for that matter. Reader ‘h c’ asked me to send him an updated version of the long-term Silver 7 chart, which I did— and it’s something I haven’t posted in this column for more than a year, as it was so ugly to look at.  It’s still not a thing of beauty, but we can only hope that the worst is behind us. With some minor variations, the silver price action followed the same path as gold, complete with the 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m. EST sell-off that the other three precious metals experienced. The low and high ticks were reported as $19.915 and $20.29 in the March contract. Silver finished on Tuesday at $20.24 spot, up 16.5 cents from Monday’s close.  Net volume was 39,000 contracts. The metals themselves [gold and silver] are still some distance from overbought level themselves, so it will be interesting to see how things develop [or are allowed to develop] in the days and weeks ahead. I’d sure like to think that the worst is over.  I know that the Commitment of Traders Report is screaming that a bottom is in—and Ted Butler has been expecting the precious metals to fly. But, as Ted always points out—and rightfully so—how far and fast we go to the upside is 100% dependent on what JPMorgan et al do in the current rally.  Will they stand by and “let ‘er rip” to the upside—or will it be the same old, same old—as I said in my column yesterday. They have obviously been around every trading day so far this week—and have stepped in where they felt it necessary, but that still doesn’t alter the fact that we could still move sharply higher from here if that is what they have decided to let happen, or have been instructed to do. Of course, I’m cheering for “let ‘er rip”—but constantly aware that nothing happens to precious metal prices without their consent.  This time is no different. As I also mentioned in this space yesterday, the cut-off for this Friday’s Commitment of Traders Report was at the 1:30 p.m. EST close of Comex trading on Tuesday.  I was not overly happy to see such big volume on such small price moves in both metals yesterday.  But that is tempered by the fact that the 75 minute sell-off in all four precious metals added to the volume considerably as “da boyz” turned on the technical funds for that brief period. I’m also mindful of the fact that, despite the price action, the numbers in last week’s COT Report were a big surprise, especially in silver—and despite the price action of the last three days, I’m not going to attempt to second guess what might be in this Friday’s report.  On the surface it may be the same old thing—but it’s what’s going on out of sight under the hood that I’ll be interested in—and I’ll get that all from Ted on Friday afternoon. In the Far East on their Wednesday, both gold and silver got sold down a bit in the first hour of trading—and haven’t recovered back above their Tuesday closing prices now that London has been open about 25 minutes.  Volumes are very light for this time of day—and down well over 50% from where they were this time yesterday.  JPMorgan et al didn’t have to put out any precious metal price fires in the Far East today, so that’s the entire reason why volumes have shrivelled up.  The dollar index isn’t doing anything. And as I hit the send button on today’s missive at 5:10 a.m. EST, the precious metals aren’t doing anything, although volumes have picked up quite a bit, especially in gold—and the volumes in both metals are all of the HFT variety.  The dollar index is still chopping sideways. As for what might happen during the remainder of the trading day today—I haven’t a clue, and won’t hazard a guess. I hope your day goes well—and I’ll see you here tomorrow. The dollar index close in New York late on Monday afternoon at 80.64—and by the 8:20 a.m. Comex open, it was down to 80.46.  After rallying back to 80.65 by 9:10 a.m. EST, it fell back to 80.46 shortly before 11 a.m.—and by the 1:30 p.m. Comex close it was back to basically unchanged on the day.  The index closed at 80.62—down 2 basis point. Uranium Energy Corp. (NYSE MKT: UEC) is pleased to announce that the final authorization has been granted for production at its Goliad ISR Project in South Texas.  As announced in previous press releases, the Company received all of the required authorizations from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, including an Aquifer Exemption which has now been granted concurrence from EPA Region 6. Amir Adnani, President and CEO, stated, “We are very pleased to have received this final authorization for initiating production at Goliad. Our geological and engineering teams have worked diligently toward achieving this major milestone and are to be truly commended. We are grateful to the EPA for its thorough reviews and for issuing this final concurrence. The Company’s near-term plan is to complete construction at the first production area at Goliad and to greatly increase the throughput of uranium at our centralized Hobson processing plant.” Please contact Investor Relations with questions or to request additional information, info@uraniumenergy.com. The gold stocks gapped up about a percent at the open—and then rallied to their highs of the day just a few minutes before noon in New York.  After that they chopped sideways, giving up a point or so going into the close.  The HUI still managed to finish up a healthy 4.20%. The silver equities more or less followed the same path as the gold shares, with the high tick of the day coming at precisely noon EST—and Nick Laird’s Intraday Silver Sentiment Index closed up 3.82%.last_img read more

Government health agencies have spent more than tw

first_imgGovernment health agencies have spent more than two decades shying away from gun violence research, but some say the new spending bill, signed by President Trump on Friday, will change that.That is because, in agency instructions that accompany the bill, there is a sentence noting that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has the authority to conduct research on the causes of gun violence.”I think this is a huge victory for our country and our communities and our children. This is one step in many to help stop gun violence in this country,” says Rep. Stephanie Murphy, a Democrat from the Orlando, Fla., area, where a mass shooting left 49 dead at a gay nightclub in 2016. But researchers who study gun violence are unimpressed.”There’s no funding. There’s no agreement to provide funding. There isn’t even encouragement. No big questions get answered, and there’s nothing here, yet, of significance for the research community,” says Dr. Garen Wintemute, a well-known expert on gun violence and a professor of emergency medicine at the University of California, Davis.”I’m not particularly optimistic that anything will change,” says Daniel Webster, a researcher at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.The CDC has been willing to look at noncontroversial activities, such as the effect of mediating disputes between gangs, says Webster, “but the CDC has not, and I don’t believe they will examine other kinds of interventions or other kinds of solutions to the problem.”That is because, back in 1996, Congress passed something called the Dickey Amendment. It said that none of the funds given to the CDC for injury prevention could be used to advocate for or promote gun control. The law came along with a cut in funding that delivered a powerful message: Pursue research on hot-button questions about guns and face the wrath of lawmakers who control the agency’s funding.”At a time when we were just beginning to do good science around how to protect ourselves and better understand the risk and the benefit from owning and using firearms, language was put on the federal budget which had a chilling effect and, in effect, stopped research dead in its tracks,” says Dr. Georges Benjamin, who is the executive director of the American Public Health Association.Jay Dickey, the Arkansas Republican and former lawmaker whom the federal amendment is named for, later told NPR that he regretted it. “It wasn’t necessary that all research stop,” Dickey explained. “It just couldn’t be the collection of data so that they can advocate gun control. That’s all we were talking about. But for some reason, it just stopped altogether.”Recent mass shootings have forced government officials to address the lack of research funding. Alex Azar, the secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, spoke to lawmakers on Capitol Hill in February, the day after a shooting at a Parkland Fla., school left 17 people dead. When asked about the Dickey Amendment, he said his understanding was that it “does not in any way impede our ability to conduct our research mission. It is simply about advocacy.”Rep. Kathy Castor, a Democrat from Florida, pressed him on whether he would instruct the agencies he leads to do gun research. “We certainly will,” Azar answered. “Our Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — we’re in the science business and the evidence-generating business, and so I will have our agency certainly be working in this field.”As mild as those remarks were, they made headlines. And the language in the government spending bill explicitly refers to those comments: “While appropriations language prohibits the CDC and other agencies from using appropriated funding to advocate or promote gun control, the Secretary of Health and Human Services has stated the CDC has the authority to conduct research on the causes of gun violence.”Webster worries that rather than freeing up the CDC to fund more research on gun violence, this new language might do the opposite, by seeming to limit CDC funding to examining the “causes” of gun violence.”Before, it didn’t restrict it to the ’causes,’ ” notes Webster. In his view, this spending bill “certainly doesn’t add anything new that is good.”In an ideal world, Congress would have done something much bolder, says Georges Benjamin. “I would have preferred the Dickey language to be removed — strong language that says, ‘Yes, research is permissible,’ and money,” Benjamin says. “We didn’t get those three things.”But he does believe that the intent of the budget language was to make research more permissible and that public health agencies should be able to find some money in the funding they’re due to receive from the new budget to move firearms research forward. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

Even in the middle of the day in middle of the we

first_imgEven in the middle of the day, in middle of the week, the theater was completely packed.Hundreds had come to watch Rafiki, a movie about two young Kenyan women who are full of life, joy and wonder. Kena is a great student; she plays football and hangs out with the guys. And Ziki is the free spirit — cotton candy dreads and a smile full of mischief.At one point, inside an abandoned van, the two realize they’ve fallen for each other. They touch, they look in each others’ eyes. At the theater, you could almost hear the audience holding its breath — and as their lips touched, there was applause.Over the past week, there has been a small revolution happening across movie screens in Kenya. For the first time, a same-sex love story is playing on the big screen, sparking conversations about freedom of expression, the constitution and finally feeling heard.After the movie, the theater lobby is buzzing. Alex Teyie, 25, is sitting with a group of friends, discussing what just happened.”It’s like, a queer movie in Nairobi in 2018,” she says. “That’s just fantastic to see.”Rafiki is a milestone here, where gay sex is illegal. A few years ago, the film Stories of Our Lives, which profiles several LGBT Kenyans, was banned. It was so controversial that some of the filmmakers feared retaliation and legal consequences. So for a long time, they remained anonymous.The Kenya Film Classification Board used many of the same arguments to ban Rafiki. In a letter banning the film, Ezekiel Mutua, the outspoken and controversial head of the KFCB, said the film “undermined the sensibilities” of Kenyans.”Rafiki contains homosexual scenes that are against the law, the culture and moral values of the Kenyan people,” Mutua said in a statement in April. “The film seeks to overtly promote lesbianism.”The film’s director, Wanuri Kahiu, sued the KFCB saying the ban was not only an affront to her constitutional rights but would also keep the movie from being considered for the Oscars. One of the requirements for a nomination is that a movie is screened at least seven days in its home country. While deciding on the merits of the case, Kenya’s high court issued a temporary injunction, allowing Rafiki to be screened for seven days, from September 23 to 29. Teyie’s friend, Valary Mumbo, says the ruling is bittersweet. She wishes the film were playing for months so Kenyans in other cities and villages could watch it. But she can’t help but feel glee that two theaters were jam-packed on a weekday.”It’s really good to see that Kenyans are waking up,” she says. “Yeah, they’re good. They are woke.”Over the phone from Los Angeles, Kahiu says they had “won the battle, but we have to continue with the war.” Rafiki was the first Kenyan movie to screen at the Cannes Film Festival in France and she says she was heartbroken when it was banned at home.”The case has become larger than the film, because the case is not about Rafiki,” she says. “The case is about freedom of expression.”In a lot of ways, this is just one instance in which Kenya is coming to terms with one of the most liberal constitutions on the African continent. Courts are currently weighing cases about separation of powers; they are hearing challenges to the country’s anti-sodomy laws. And here, the court is going to decide whether Kahiu has the right to tell a love story that challenges some of the country’s conservative moorings.In a statement, the film classification board called the temporary halt on its ban “a sad moment and a great insult.”Kahiu says she is simply a filmmaker who wants to tell a love story with authentic characters. She says she just wanted to show the beauty and heartbreak that ensues when two black LGBT characters follow their heart.”That was the point, that it doesn’t matter who you are, love is love and that is an absolute universal, basic language,” she says. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more