Special economic zone for SA’s plantinum belt

first_imgA special economic zone (SEZ) is to be established in the Rustenburg platinum belt in the North West, Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies announced last week.“The purpose of this SEZ will be to develop industries that use platinum as an input,” Mr Davies said. “These include jewellery, catalytic converters and fuel cell technology.”Davies announced the SEZ in his keynote address on reindustrialisation in South Africa and the Industrial Policy Action Plan (Ipap) as part of the Japan Seminar held at the Gordon Institute of Business Science in Johannesburg last week. The seminar was hosted by the Japanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry in South Africa and the Japan External Trade Organisation (JETRO).Davies said his department had made “significant gains” through iterations of Ipap since its inception in the 2007-08 financial year. Achievements were made in the clothing and textile, automotive, agro-processing and film sectors.Private-sector consultation“Ipap is neither a policy document nor a wish list,” he said. “It is a set of time-bound actions which have to be undertaken by different parts of government. These have been successful because they are developed in consultation with the private sector.”He said that, through Ipap, the government had succeeded in developing finance institutions and introducing a suite of incentives to support manufacturing and the competitiveness of companies.The theme of the seminar was Local Industrialisation in South Africa and the Contribution of Japanese Businesses – Lessons from East Asia.Japanese foreign direct investments are steadily increasing in South Africa, the DTI said. Japanese investments in the country have generated around 150 000 jobs. Companies such as Toyota are increasingly becoming involved in supplier development programmes, which are significantly raising the capacity of local manufacturers.The DTI said it had signed memoranda of understanding with JETRO as well as Japanese banks through its Trade and Investment Division.The objective of the agreements is to support the increase of trade between Japan and South Africa and to assist Japanese investors entering the local market.Source: The Department of Trade and IndustryRelated stories:Call for Africa to beneficiate its minerals Zuma announces measures to jump-start economylast_img read more

It’s time to grow forage, take inventory, and use it efficiently

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Victor Shelton, NRCS state agronomist/grazing specialistFall is here and it means that our perennial forages are starting to think about taking a siesta. You will want to do three things this time of year: grow as much forage as you can prior to plants going dormant, be as efficient as you can with what you have to graze, and take inventory on how much winter feed you have on hand.There are still plenty of good growing days left this fall and they need to be taken advantage of. One of the first things to do to make sure you obtain as much growth as possible, especially with perennial forages, is to stop grazing forages that can and will continue to grow for a while, especially forages that will stockpile like tall fescue.Tall fescue stockpiles better than almost any other forage in the midwest. I would rather that not be old Kentucky 31 endophyte-infected fescue, but even KY 31 makes some really good feed in the winter time, especially after going through a few hard freezes. Freezing and time help to improve it. Forages that will not stockpile well or ones that lose quality and nutritional value fast once they go dormant or freeze should be utilized first. But, before you open the gate to that pasture field with forages that won’t stockpile for later, please consider first what other options you have right now. Remember what was mentioned last month; the more you can grow now, the more you will have to graze and the less feed will be needed.So, what do we have to graze? Hopefully you did better than me and got some annuals planted early enough and have a lot of good growth on them. Oats especially, if planted back in early August, will make some excellent forage now. These oats are probably best utilized by strip grazing them. We’ll talk about that a bit more in a while.If you planted a warm-season forage mix after wheat harvest, these forages can still be grazed now but with some caution as we approach colder weather. Once frosted, summer annual warm-season grasses such as sudangrass or sorghum-sudangrass hybrids quickly start shutting down and can produce a cyanide-containing compound commonly called prussic acid. This acid is the same compound that is produced by these plants under stressed conditions. Livestock should be removed from these forages for ten to fourteen days to allow the forages to “dry down” and the prussic acid to dissipate before grazing again. Frosted areas could be only “pockets” in a field to start with. Any regrowth from the base of the plant after a frost can also be very high in prussic acid. If in doubt about nitrates or prussic acid – test before feeding or grazing!Corn stalks, like discussed last month, can help provide some good quality feed and will be even better if annuals were planted into them. Dry soil conditions are ideal and again, strip grazing across the field is better than just turning them into the whole. We want those stalks to last as long as they can and we also don’t want to cause any compaction for the next crop. Grazing it under dry conditions, using a cover crop such as cereal rye, and not feeding on the crop field can help prevent and/or relieve compaction issues associated with grazing it.Hay field aftermath may also be used as potential grazing. We are certainly at a point in time when it is not practical to really think about any more hay, especially where little forage regrowth is present and never mind how hard it can be to get it dry at this point. It’s also hard to justify the costs of the necessary operations for what little forage is normally still remaining this time of year.Another option that most people don’t think about or even consider as an option this time of year is hay or other stored feeds. If you do not have anything else to graze other than pasture AND there is sufficient moisture, nutrients and time for more growth, then feeding some hay for a little while can allow for some growth that can be utilized later. I’ve actually done this in August before because of droughty conditions.You want to be as efficient as possible with whatever you are grazing this time of year. You want the stalks or forage to last as long as possible and you don’t want to waste too much either. Even if you don’t strip graze any other time of the year, once forage growth slows down and especially after it stops, it really increases harvest efficiency. It’s probably best to think of any remaining forage or stockpile as “standing” forage or “standing hay.” You allocate out hay by the bale as needed, so why wouldn’t you allocate out stockpiled forage the same way? You wouldn’t turn the cows into the hay barn and say just eat what you need and don’t waste any!You can very easily strip graze across hay aftermath, stockpiled fields and corn residue with the use of some temporary fence. All you need is some step-in posts, some poly-wire on a reel and a way to make it electrified and you’re in business. Use a simple plastic step-in post every 25 to 30 feet or as needed depending on the terrain and allocate out one to three days worth at a time. You will quickly recognize if you provided enough and adjust the next allocation. The cows will let you know if you shorted them. It’s best to start at the watering facility end of the field and work away from it unless you have multiple watering sites.Lastly, it is important to know how much forage, stockpiled forage, stalks, hay aftermath, annuals, hay, and other feed stuff is available for this winter. Weigh this against what is going to be needed for all the ruminant livestock on the farm. Do you have enough feed items until spring? Remember, on average, most ruminant livestock will utilize at least 3% of their body weight in dry matter per day (1,000 pound cow = 30 pounds of dry hay, not adjusted for moisture). Feeding efficiency of fed feeds is just as important as the allocation efficiency of standing forages. If poorly stored hay is also poorly fed, then up to fifty percent of a bale can be wasted. We’ll try and talk about this subject more next month.If you are short on forages and stored feed for this winter then now is the time to think about animal numbers. Do you have some that could or need to be culled? The quicker those animals leave the farm the better. Sharpen your pencil and do some math.Plan ahead for the coming winter and keep on grazing!last_img read more

Commodity leaders join forces on sustainability research

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The National Pork Board (NPB), United Soybean Board (USB) and National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) announce the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on a sustainability research platform that will benefit all three organizations and their producers. This research program will include the sharing of completed research, coordination on current and planned research and define ways to share and communicate results with each organization’s members.Leadership from the three commodity groups agree that it is prudent to consider specific ways in which they might work together more effectively to ensure alignment and collaboration in sustainability research and how the results can and will be communicated and shared.“Sustainability is defined by the We Care ethical principles pork producers established over 10 years ago,” said Steve Rommereim, National Pork Board President, a pig farmer from South Dakota. “Joining in the efforts of two other organizations, as a collective group, we can more effectively spend producer dollars to achieve the goals we can all believe in and support. Without one, we wouldn’t have the other.”An overarching goal of proactive, continuous improvement is a shared focus among pork, soybean and corn producers.“Most farmers are invested in multiple commodities and invested in more than one of our organizations, so it’s important that we are collaborating wherever we can,” said Lewis Bainbridge, USB chair and soybean and livestock farmer from South Dakota. “We need to be supportive of one another, especially now when there’s more interest in what we’re doing to produce our commodities. We need to be looking at the big picture of how our commodities work together and take that a step further.”Through combined communications efforts and outreach, the organizations can increase the education, capacity and motivation of pig and grain farmers to adopt conservation measures that deliver benefits to the environment and to farm resilience and profitability.“NCGA’s targeted focus — whether it’s policy, market development or research — is to grind more corn and do it profitably. However, in areas like sustainability and research where we share goals and values in our industry, it is just plain smart to work in collaboration,” said Lynn Chrisp, NCGA president of Hastings, Nebraska. “This memorandum will encourage increased communications, further sharing of staff and funding resources, pool expertise, and ultimately makes us all more effective.”A task force of farmer representatives from NPB, USB and NCGA will be formed and, with support from each organization, will be responsible for managing and evaluating the activities outlined in the MOU. Additionally, the task force will track progress and evaluate the value and impact of the MOU upon completion of all activities.last_img read more

I’m the Most Ecstatic Baby on the Block! Adding Emotional Words to Babies’ Vocabularies

first_imgBy Jenna M. Weglarz-Ward[Flickr, Simi and Rachael by Jerry John, CC BY-ND 2.0] Retrieved on September 17, 2015Children begin to learn about relationships and language starting in the womb. As babies listen to their mothers talk to the clerk at the grocery store, sing to the radio, and chat with family members, they begin to develop a brain for language. Once born, they continue to listen to their mothers and family members use language to communicate with each other, solve problems, and develop relationships. Even before their first words, babies understand the language around them and their brains develop pathways to strengthen their ability to understand and express themselves.At the same time, they are learning about the emotional environment. They experience stress, excitement, happiness, sadness, and frustration themselves and observe and feel other’s emotional states. They are learning that when Mom makes a certain face, she does not feel good but when her body feels a different way, she feels better. Similar to language, babies are developing neural pathways to help them learn what do with their own and other’s emotions.Research has indicated that the earlier and more we talk to our babies, the better their outcomes will be. Additionally, children with strong emotional literacy have better academic success and less challenging behaviors [3]. Betty Hart and Todd Risley’s [1] ground breaking work indicated that children who live in low incomes families are not exposed to as many words as children in more affluent homes, as many as 30 thousand less words before they enter kindergarten. This commonly referred to as the Word Gap. Additionally, vocabulary in lower income homes is more likely to be directive and negative (e.g, get your shoes, you’re in trouble). Children in more affluent homes are more likely to have exposure to a larger range of vocabulary. However, family income may not be the only factor that impacts the word exposure to children. Parents who struggle with mental health issues, are experiencing trauma or illness, are single parents, work long hours, have multiple children, or spend a lot of time with their smartphones, may be talking to their children less often than possible. Therefore, it is important to support all families in bridging the word gap.Not only does this word gap impact language and cognitive outcomes including school readiness, a lack of learning and understanding of emotional words can impede social and emotional development. It is common that children with language delays also have challenges in making friends and identifying and coping with their emotions. Therefore, it is important to not only talk to our babies more, but make sure that we are including emotional vocabulary as well.Dr. Dana Suskind at the University of Chicago has more recently expanded on this work through the 30 Thousand Word Initiative. Dr. Suskind, has been working to support parents and communities in talking to their children more in order to close this gap. In addition to the strategies we presented in our December webinar on emotional literacy such as expressing your own feelings, labeling children’s emotions, and reading and singing about emotions, Suskind [4] recommends the 3 T’s.Tune In: Notice what the child is focused on and talk about that. Respond when a child communicates – including when a baby cries or coos.Talk More: Narrate day to day routines, such as diaper changes and tooth brushing. Use details: “Let Mommy take off your diaper. Oh, so wet. Does that feel better now?”Take Turns: Keep the conversation going. Respond to your child’s sounds, gestures and, eventually, words – and give them time to respond to you. Ask lots of questions that require more than yes or no answers.What Emotional Words to Include?Starting with basic emotions such as happy, sad, angry are great. However, adding more complex words, even early, develops a rich emotional catalog from which children can use as they learn to understand and express their emotions. It is important to include both positive and negative emotions in their vocabularies.Complex Feeling Words [2]Affectionate, agreeable, annoyed, awfulBored, brave, bummed, beamingCalm, capable, caring, cheerful, clumsy, confused, cooperative, creative cruel, curiousDepressed, disappointed, disgusted, down, delightedEcstatic, embarrassed, enjoying, excitedFantastic, fearful, fed-up, free, friendly, frustratedGentle, generous, gloomy, guilty, gladHeavenly, hilariousIgnored, impatient, important, interestedJealous, joyfulKindLonely, lost, lovingMerryOverwhelmedPeaceful, pleasant, proud, pleased, positiveRelaxed, relievedSafe, satisfied, sensitive, serious, shy, stressed, strong, stubbornTense, thoughtful, thrilled, troubledUnafraid, uncomfortableWeary, worried, worn outWhile working with families, take time to share with them why it is important to share emotions with their children as well as how. In addition to modeling and practicing with parents, share resources available through our December webinar materials.References[1]  Hart, B., & Risley. T. (1995). Meaningful differences in the everyday experience of young American children. Baltimore, MD: Brookes Publishing.[2]  Joseph, G. E., & Strain, P. S. (2003). Enhancing emotional vocabulary in young children. Young Exceptional Children, 6(4), 18-27.[3]  Joseph, G. E., Strain, P. S, & Ostrosky, M. M. (2005). Fostering emotional literacy in young children: Labeling emotions. Center for Social Emotional Foundations for Early Learning. [4]  Suskind, D. (2015). Thirty million words: Building a child’s brain. New York, NY: Dutton.This post was written by Jenna Weglarz-Ward & Amy Santos, PhD, members of the MFLN FD Early Intervention team, which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more

RoS import vows to play better after lack of aggressive play vs Kia

first_imgLacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games MOST READ “The style of play here is what I got to be able to adjust to. I was fortunate to have this game right now so I can adjust and make the adjustments this week,” he said, as the Elasto Painters gear up for TNT next Sunday. “Life’s a challenge. I accept all challenges and we’ll just see what happens.”What Bullock’s glad about, though, is helping Rain or Shine finally break out of its slump and level its standing at 2-2, even if it came against a lowly foe like the Picanto.“Even though it wasn’t the best team in the league, it’s still a win,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT J’Nathan Bullock. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netEven J’Nathan Bullock admitted his debut game for Rain or Shine on Sunday was far from advertised.“It wasn’t my best performance, but we were able to still get the win,” he said after posting 20 points, 10 rebounds, two steals, and two blocks in the Elasto Painters’ 94-86 win over Kia.ADVERTISEMENT Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo LATEST STORIES DILG, PNP back suspension of classes during SEA Games Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his sidecenter_img Facing KYK huge challenge, morale-booster for PH volleybelles Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Though Bullock’s statline was still decent compared to his counterparts, coach Caloy Garcia expressed his displeasure for what he felt was lack of aggressiveness from his new reinforcement, as he only earned six free throws for the game.READ: Bullock ends Rain or Shine skid in nipping of KiaFEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“Our import took too much outside shots. He only started attacking the basket in the last six minutes of the game and that’s the only time we started getting to the line. I was surprised that he was not able to get to the stripe during the first half, so I just told him in the fourth quarter to head to the line,” said the youthful mentor.The 30-year-old Bullock understand his coach’s concenr and vowed to adjust better for Rain or Shine’s next game. NGCP on security risk: Chinese just technical advisers NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo View commentslast_img read more