Advocacy Groups Celebrate Gov. Wolf’s Intellectual Disability/Autism Funding

first_img Press Release,  Round-Up Governor Tom Wolf’s announcement that $260 million in CARES Act funding will be distributed to the providers of services supporting Pennsylvanians with intellectual disabilities and autism was received with praise by advocacy groups.“We will emerge from the COVID-19 crisis strongest if we continue to take care of one another, and that includes vulnerable Pennsylvanians,” said Gov. Wolf. “This funding will help ensure Pennsylvanians with intellectual disabilities or autism receive the high-quality care they deserve, even amid the COVID-19 pandemic. It will also support the hardworking Pennsylvanians who have dedicated their lives to caring for these individuals and provide peace of mind to the families of these individuals.”Richard Edley, President and CEO, Rehabilitation & Community Providers Association (RCPA):“Throughout it all, this administration has shown needed flexibility in both policy administration and financial support, and that truly has made a world of difference for providers and families. This additional funding is absolutely critical because the challenges these agencies face won’t simply disappear when the pandemic ends.”Cherie Brummans, Executive Director, Alliance of Community Service Providers:“The Alliance of Community Service Providers supports and appreciates the allocation of CARES Act funding as this relief is critically important to sustain the services to some of Pennsylvania’s most vulnerable citizens.”Sherri Landis, Executive Director, The Arc of Pennsylvania:“The Arc of Pennsylvania is grateful to Governor Wolf and Secretary Miller for their leadership in allocating CARES funding for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to continue to receive the support and services they need to live and thrive in the community. The $260 million dollars is a lifeline to the 50,000+ individuals with I/DD and their families who live in the community and receive community-based supports and services. Since the outbreak of COVID-19, the community-based system has tirelessly continued to provide individuals with the life-sustaining services in their communities.”Mark Davis, President and CEO, Pennsylvania Advocacy and Resources for Autism and Intellectual Disability (PAR):“The Governor and lawmakers in both chambers have lifted the lives of tens of thousands of our state’s most vulnerable individuals, as well as the Direct Support Professionals (DSPs) who provide the lifesaving care to individuals with ID/A. Our members and the families they serve are enormously grateful.”Patrick DeMico, Executive Director, The Provider Alliance:“Today our members are receiving notice of these essential funds. We are extremely grateful to the Commonwealth for acknowledging the tireless efforts of those supporting people with intellectual disabilities and autism. All have faced challenges and difficulties to sustain services providing needed care and support throughout the pandemic. Our gratitude to all who have advocated with us, and to our partners in government to obtain their support and understanding of the complexities and challenges faced by those with disabilities. We thank and applaud Governor Wolf, DHS leadership, and our lawmakers for their support and action on our behalf.”Ver esta página en español. June 16, 2020 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Advocacy Groups Celebrate Gov. Wolf’s Intellectual Disability/Autism Fundinglast_img read more

Health a key concern for Lakers

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error “I’ll wait until I’m ready to go,” Bryant said. “Our goal is to win a championship. That’s our expectation. But if we’re struggling and I can’t go because I’m physically not ready, I’m not going to jump out.”Nonetheless, Bryant seemed aggressive with his recovery.He had surgery on his Achilles the day after his injury. The Lakers’ training staff traveled with Bryant on trips to China, Italy and Brazil. Bryant also routinely visited the team’s facility for treatment.Still, Bryant’s 40-foot high dive that was later posted on Vine made the Lakers cringe.“I got out and jumped again; I just didn’t Vine that,” Bryant said with a grin. “I felt great. I just wanted to go out and have fun.”Bryant displayed that personality until someone brought up Dwight Howard’s departure to the Houston Rockets.“I really don’t give a ..,” Bryant said. “If he came back, it would’ve been great. If he didn’t, then it’s not.”Instead, Bryant raved about the team’s athleticism, the versatility Chris Kaman and Gasol have in the post and having a full training camp under D’Antoni. Bryant still shared the need for Nick Young and Wesley Johnson to improve defensively and to play at a methodical pace. Despite all the uncertainty surrounding his injury and the team’s dynamics, the 35-year-old Bryant enters the final year of his contract with high hopes.“Another championship,” Bryant said, grinning. “That’s an easy one.” Kobe Bryant walked gingerly across the Lakers’ practice floor, a sign he’s both progressing surrounding his surgically repaired left Achilles tendon and eager for the 2013-14 season to start.It’s also a sign that, despite a skeptical general public, Bryant remains optimistic about the Lakers’ championship prospects.“Our expectations are always the same with every single season,” Bryant said. “That’s to improve every single day with the mindset to win a championship.”Of course, that goal hinges on Bryant. But whether he will play in the Lakers’ season opener Oct. 29 against the Clippers or practice in training camp remains anybody’s guess. Bryant has recently run at 80 percent of his body weight on a weight-bearing treadmill and completed ladder exercises to improve his footwork without sprinting. He then will advance to defensive and conditioning drills before fully practicing.center_img “I need to get in shape, but it doesn’t really take me long to do that,” Bryant said. “I work hard at it. When I get back on the court, I’ll be good to go. I don’t think I’ve ever played a season where I was 100 percent. So, like 78 percent, is fine.”The Lakers have other health concerns.Lakers guard Steve Nash has fully progressed from his right hamstring, back and broken left leg that sidelined him for a combined 32 games last season. But Lakers coach Mike D’Antoni plans to limit Nash both in training camp and in games. Lakers forward Pau Gasol reported progress with his knees after having a procedure this offseason to decrease the tendon pain in his knees. But Gasol admits he’s not fully healed and hasn’t completed many basketball drills yet.“Health is always a concern,” Bryant said. “That can really cripple a team as it did for us last year.”Bryant suffered the injury April 12, shattering any optimism on the Lakers’ already slim playoff hopes. Their success will ride once again on when Bryant returns and if he can mirror last season’s output when he averaged 27.3 points on 46.3 percent shooting, six assists and 5.6 rebounds.last_img read more