Assessing crop challenges after a tough 2015

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest As the difficult 2015 season progresses toward harvest, Ohio’s growers may continue to face more challenges before the year is over. While there is not much that can be done at this point for the 2015 crop, scouting fields will help growers to decide which fields need to be harvested first as well as what plans should be made for next year in terms of crop rotation, tillage, varietal selection, etc.In many areas of the state, diseases have developed in both corn and soybean fields. Weather played a big part in the appearance and development of disease. For soybeans, sclerotinia white mold (SWM), sudden death syndrome (SDS), and frogeye leaf spot (FE) have developed late in the season. Rainy weather from May through July created an environment conducive to SWM development below the canopy. SDS has appeared in areas of fields where soil compaction exists and soil was saturated for long periods of time this spring. Wet weather has also cause FE to develop in certain areas of the state, especially on susceptible varieties. Determining what diseases are present in 2015 will allow growers to make management decisions for next year such as rotating to corn, choosing resistant varieties, or alleviating compaction and improving soil drainage.In corn, gray leaf spot (GLS), which can be identified by lesions that look like elongated rectangles, became a problem in certain areas of Ohio this year, requiring growers to apply a fungicide. GLS development occurs where conditions such as periods of heavy dew, fog, or light rain exist. Northern corn leaf blight (NCLB), identified by large “cigar-shaped” lesions, showed up in Ohio fields as much as two weeks earlier than normal this year and caused severe leaf damage on susceptible hybrids where disease pressure was heavy. NCLB development occurs as a result of wet, humid weather where periods of heavy dew and fog exist.In fields where these diseases developed, growers should consider crop rotation away from corn, tilling residues, and planting hybrids with good resistance to disease in the future. Because fungicide applications are costly, many factors should be taken into consideration to determine if they are necessary. Crop stage, disease pressure, crop rotation history, hybrid disease resistance, and weather patterns are all factors that need to be considered before applying fungicides.As crops approach maturity and harvest begins, standability could become an issue in corn fields. Root-restricting compaction exists in fields that were planted when soil was too wet or “marginal.” Where wet weather has persisted and soils have been saturated, root development has been limited. With limited root development, the possibility of root lodging is a concern. Additionally, Ohio’s corn fields have experienced various environmental factors that create stress conditions for the plant and as a result, stalk rots could be an issue late in the season. Ohio State University Bulletin 802 states: “The severity of stalk rot is confounded by plant stress. In general, the greater the stress the plant endures, the greater the severity of stalk rot. This has been demonstrated very well with plant nutrition. Plants with excessively high levels of nitrogen or with an imbalance between nitrogen and potassium are very susceptible to stalk rot. Plants stressed by drought (especially late season drought), foliage disease, or insect injury generally have more stalk rot.”Ohio’s corn fields have experienced nitrogen loss, leaf disease, and insect damage this year. Some areas of the state have experienced dry conditions late in the season as well. Where standability is a concern, corn should be harvested as soon as possible after reaching physiological maturity.Estimating yields and evaluating varietal performance will be a challenge this year. One theme that appears almost everywhere in the state is variability. In a single field it is not uncommon to see areas that will produce average or better yields while wet spots may not produce anything at all. Variability as a result of excessive wet weather will hurt yields and will cause lower field averages across much of the state.While many of the factors making 2015 a challenging year are out of the grower’s control, scouting, note taking, and collecting harvest data will still aid Ohio’s farmer in determining what needs to be done after harvest and next spring. Growers should use the time between now and harvest to observe what issues exist in their fields and use that information to make sound management decisions in the future.last_img read more

Ohio State students talk agriculture at Farmers Share

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio State Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow brought their Farmers Share event to a new location this year – the Waterman Dairy Farm. CFAES organizations teamed up to bus students from central campus to just down the road from the Horseshoe in hopes of teaching fellow students more about the agricultural world. Ohio Ag Net’s Joel Penhorwood is joined by Ohio State’s Marlee Stollar and Joel Sonnenberg to learn more about this year’s event.last_img

Modi’s remarks on Alwar rape aimed at polls: Gehlot

first_imgRefuting Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s remarks on the gangrape last month of a Dalit woman in Alwar, Rajasthan Chief Minister Ashok Gehlot on Monday accused him of targeting the Congress on the issue for political mileage in the sixth and seventh phases of Lok Sabha election.Mr. Gehlot said Mr. Modi had twisted facts as a “ploy to get electoral benefit”.The Chief Minister told reporters here that contrary to Mr. Modi’s claims and despite his attempts to provoke Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) chief Mayawati, there was no likelihood of the party withdrawing support to the Congress government in Rajasthan.“We will continue to get the BSP’s support. Ms. Mayawati’s concern is natural and justified, as she leads the Dalit community,” he said.Addressing the election rallies in eastern Uttar Pradesh, Mr. Modi had launched an attack on Mr. Gehlot and Ms. Mayawati and dared the latter to withdraw support to the Rajasthan government over the incident. Mr. Gehlot said the State government had already taken prompt action in the matter and the police had arrested all the accused. “The Thanagazi SHO was suspended and Alwar Superintendent of Police was removed. But Mr. Modi is using this incident in his election campaign to personally target me,” he said.The Chief Minister said the State government had decided to appoint Deputy Superintendents of Police (Women’s Security) in each district as nodal officers to supervise investigation into the crimes against women and children. If a police station refused to accept a complaint in such a case, the SP could directly register the FIR, he said.Mr. Gehlot said several cases of rape took place during the previous BJP regime in Rajasthan and a BJP MLA was involved in a rape case in Uttar Pradesh. “Mr. Modi never talked about them,” he said, adding that reports had emerged about BJP leader Hem Singh Bhadana going to the victim’s family with an offer to settle the matter.“Mr. Modi has been personally targeting me on various occasions. This is the latest instance. When I was in-charge [of Congress] during Assembly election in Gujarat, he misled and provoked farmers against me. He has no right to take a high moral ground and generate controversy in a rape case,” Mr. Gehlot said.Mr. Gehlot also accused the Prime Minister of bringing all democratic institutions under the control of Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sevak (RSS) and threatening their very existence. “Democracy and the Constitution are under threat in the BJP’s rule. Mr. Modi wants to win the Lok Sabha election by hook or by crook… He can go to any extent. The Election Commission has become a silent spectator,” Mr. Gehlot said.After Mr. Modi accused Ms. Mayawati of shedding “crocodile tears” on the gangrape, the BSP chief rejected the charge as “dirty politics”. BSP State president Sitaram Meghwal told The Hindu that Ms. Mayawati was closely monitoring the progress of investigation in the case and his party would ensure that the criminals were brought to justice.last_img read more

Refreshing history

first_imgWith this thought, Doordarshan is set to telecast Dastan-E-Urdu, a new 13-part docu-drama series, bringing alive the fascinating history of this Indian language, breaking the myths by unveiling several interesting cross-cultural connections every Sunday at 9:30 pm.  Directed by Aparna Srivastava Reddy and produced by eminent Urdu activist Kamna Prasad, the 13 part series of Dastan-E-Urdu explores the journey of Urdu language and its mushtarqa tehzeeb. Be it literature, journalism or popular culture, expressed in recent times through theatre, films, television or the new media, Urdu language has retained its eminent place in the mind and hearts of people. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’In order to showcase the language’s grandeur and its tehzeeb in purest sense, Dastan-E-Urdu has deployed deep research into Urdu’s language journey, while conceptualising it. Dastan-E-Urdu takes the viewer on a pan-India journey, capturing all the aspects and nuances that underscore Urdu’s poetic opulence, its Ganga-Jamuni syncretic essence as well its everlasting, universal appeal.‘Understanding the evolution of Urdu, gives fresh insights into who we are as Indians’ is the bottom line of the show. Covering myriad shades and influences of Urdu language, the programme is being shot all over the country – from Kashmir to Kerala. It delves into dramatisation of key personalities and reconstructions of key periods in the history of the language. Galaxy of experts including Prof Gopi Chand Narang, Javed Akhtar, Prof Shamim Hanfi, Shamsur Rehman Farukhi, Pt Gulzar Dehlvi, Prof Mushirul Hasan, Dr Karan Singh and Farooq Sheikh among other stalwarts creates a panoramic view of Urdu’s evolutionary journey for the viewer. The music for the show is given by Shubha Mudgal.last_img read more