Khan fears for McGregor in Mayweather bout

first_imgBishop Baylon encourages faithful in Albay to help Taal evacuees Phoenix Suns guard Knight to miss season after knee op OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson With the bout expected to bring in more than $60 million at the gate, the commission could earn as much as $1.2 million.But Bob Bennett, the executive director of the commission, hit back at suggestions of a conflict of interest.“As a regulator, I take offense to the fact that we’re approving this fight for fiduciary reasons,” Bennett said. “That’s totally unfair, and it’s simply not true.” McGregor has never fought in a professional boxing contest and is a huge underdog against Mayweather, a 49-0 fighter regarded as one of the best boxers in history.“It’s like a tennis player trying to play badminton,” Khan said.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’“So he (McGregor) should not show too much too balls in this fight. If he starts getting a beating — step out man,” he added.“He needs to think about himself in this fight, because if he gets seriously injured, he might not ever be the same fighter or he might not even fight again.” LATEST STORIES Hotdog’s Dennis Garcia dies MOST READ Conor McGregor stands on stage during a weigh-in Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, in Las Vegas. McGregor is scheduled to fight Floyd Mayweather Jr. in a boxing bout Saturday. (AP Photo/John Locher)LAS VEGAS — British boxer Amir Khan fears Conor McGregor could face serious injury as the Irishman prepares to face Floyd Mayweather here Saturday.Former light-welterweight world champion Khan told the MMA Hour television show Friday he believed mixed martial arts star McGregor could be hurt in what he expects will be a one-sided meeting with Mayweather in Las Vegas.ADVERTISEMENT Britain’s Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to give up royal titles Marcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’center_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Khan’s fears reflect wider misgivings by some in the boxing community who believe Saturday’s money-spinning superfight should never have been sanctioned on safety grounds.The head of the Association of Ringside Physicians, Larry Lovelace, is among those who believe Nevada should not have granted a licence to the fight.“We were very surprised this bout was even sanctioned and was going to be permitted to carry on,” Lovelace was quoted as saying by the New York Times.“The thing I really fear, truly fear, is that somebody’s going to get really hurt.”The Nevada State Athletic Commission, which sanctioned the fight, has a financial interest in the fight going ahead, earning a slice of the gross ticket receipts.ADVERTISEMENT Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite What’s in store for your animal sign this year National Historical team rescues Amorsolos, artifacts from Taal Police seize P68-M worth of ‘shabu’ in Pasay Search on for 5 Indonesians snatched anew in Lahad Datu Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View commentslast_img read more

Scalable CVD process for making 2D molybdenum diselenide

first_imgShareMEDIA CONTACTS:David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduJade Boyd713-348-6778jadeboyd@rice.eduScalable CVD process for making 2-D molybdenum diselenide Rice, NTU scientists unveil CVD production for coveted 2-D semiconductorHOUSTON — (April 8, 2014) — Nanoengineering researchers at Rice University and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have unveiled a potentially scalable method for making one-atom-thick layers of molybdenum diselenide — a highly sought semiconductor that is similar to graphene but has better properties for making certain electronic devices like switchable transistors and light-emitting diodes.This image from a scanning transmission electron microscope shows the individual atoms in a two-dimensional sheet of molybdenum diselenide. Credit: E. Ringe/Rice UniversityThe method for making two-dimensional molybdenum diselenide uses a technique known as chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and is described online in a new paper in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano. The finding is significant because CVD is widely used by the semiconductor and materials industries to make thin films of silicon, carbon fibers and other materials.“This new method will allow us to exploit the properties of molybdenum diselenide in a number of applications,” said study leader Pulickel Ajayan, chair of Rice’s Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering. “Unlike graphene, which can now easily be made in large sheets, many interesting 2-D materials remain difficult to synthesize. Now that we have a stable, efficient way to produce 2-D molybdenum diselenide, we are planning to expand this robust procedure to other 2-D materials.”In the Rice study, Ajayan and colleagues tested their atomically thin layers of molybdenum diselenide by building a field effect transistor (FET), a commonly used device in the microelectronic industry. Tests of the FET found the electronic properties of the molybdenum diselenide layers were significantly better than those of molybdenum disulfide; the latter is a similar material that has been more extensively studied because it was easier to fabricate. For example, the FET tests found that the electron mobility of Rice’s molybdenum diselenide was higher than that of CVD-grown, molybdenum disulfide.Pulickel AjayanIn solid-state physics, electron mobility refers to how quickly electrons pass through a metal or semiconductor in the presence of an electric field. Materials with high electron mobility are often preferred to reduce power consumption and heating in microelectronic devices.“Being able to make 2-D materials in a controlled fashion really will make an impact on our understanding and use of their fascinating properties,” said study co-author Emilie Ringe, assistant professor of materials science and nanoengineering and of chemistry at Rice. “Characterizing both the structure and function of a material, as we have done in this paper, is critical to such advances.”Molybdenum diselenide and molybdenum disulfide each belong to a class of materials known as transition metal dichalcogenides; TMDCs are so named because they consist of two elements, a transition metal like molybdenum or tungsten and a “chalcogen” like sulfur, selenium or tellurium.TMDCs have attracted intense interest from materials scientists because they have an atomic structure similar to graphene, the pure carbon wonder materials that attracted the 2010 Nobel Prize in physics. Graphene and similar materials are often referred to as two-dimensional because they are only one atom thick. Graphene has extraordinary electronic properties. For example, its electron mobility is tens of thousands of times greater than that of TMDCs.Emilie RingeHowever, two-dimensional TMDCs like molybdenum diselenide have attracted intense interest because their electronic properties are complementary to graphene. For example, pure graphene has no bandgap — a useful electronic property that engineers can exploit to make FETs that are easily switched on and off.As with many nanomaterials, scientists have found that the physical properties of TMDCs change markedly when the material has nanoscale properties. For example, a slab of molybdenum diselenide that is even a micron thick has an “indirect” bandgap while a two-dimensional sheet of molybdenum diselenide has a “direct” bandgap. The difference is important for electronics because direct-bandgap materials can be used to make switchable transistors and sensitive photodetectors.“One of the driving forces in Rice’s Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering is the close collaborations that develop between the people who are focused on synthesis and those of us involved with characterization,” said Ringe, who joined Rice’s faculty in January. “We hope this will be the beginning of a series of new protocols to reliably synthesize a variety of 2-D materials.”The research was supported by the Army Research Office, the Semiconductor Research Corporation’s FAME Center, the Office of Naval Research and Singapore’s MOE Academic Research Fund.Additional study co-authors include Xingli Wang, Yongji Gong, Gang Shi, Kunttal Keyshar, Gonglan Ye, Robert Vajtai and Jun Lou, all of Rice, and Wai Leong Chow, Zheng Liu and Beng Kang Tay, all of Nanyang Technological University.-30-High-resolution IMAGES are available for download at:http://news.rice.edu/files/2014/04/0407_MOLY-mose2-lg.jpgCAPTION: This image from a scanning transmission electron microscope shows the individual atoms in a two-dimensional sheet of molybdenum diselenide.CREDIT: E. Ringe/Rice Universityhttp://news.rice.edu/files/2014/04/0407_MOLY-ajayan-mug.jpgCAPTION: Pulickel AjayanCREDIT: Rice Universityhttp://news.rice.edu/files/2014/04/0407_MOLY-ringe7-lg.jpgCAPTION: Emilie RingeCREDIT: Rice UniversityA copy of the ACS Nano paper is available at:http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn501175k AddThislast_img read more