Throwback time: Warriors going old school for pivotal Game 6 against Rockets

first_img[vemba-video id=”van/sc/2019/05/10/bang_2cff992e-b1f0-42ba-9931-56bcde697ede”]The Warriors are returning to their roots — even ahead of Game 6 against the Rockets at the Toyota Center in Houston. Stephen Curry wore his 2015 shoes at the shootaround as the Dubs prepare to throw it back to the high-pick-and-roll style that won them their first championship, and then in 73 games in 2016.The same style, which the Cleveland Cavaliers also exploited in the later games of the 2016 NBA Finals, …last_img

Biological Designs Worth Imitating

first_imgTaking that lesson to heart, scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison are using the decellularized husks of plants such as parsley, vanilla and orchids to form three-dimensional scaffolds that can then be primed and seeded with human stem cells to optimize their growth in the lab dish and, ultimately, create novel biomedical implants.DNA computers are coming along, says Live Science. Tia Ghose writes, “Computers of the Future May Be Minuscule Molecular Machines.” Inspired by DNA’s longevity and extreme storage density, scientists have already encoded the entire works of Shakespeare in the genetic molecules (see article at Evolution News and hear it on ID the Future). Now that biology has shown the way to efficient data storage, engineers at DARPA are looking at other molecules that could encode in new ways beyond silicon’s 1’s and 0’s and DNA’s A-C-T-G system, using orientation, size and color to represent additional bits of information.Power plants. Bio-engineers have been trying to replicate photosynthesis for years, but still seem to have a long way to go. Science Daily says that a Japanese team has uncovered another part of the mechanism the plant uses to break down water, “marking another step towards the potential development of artificial photosynthesis.”Algae petrol. Imagine how much better it would be to create fuel from an abundant, renewable resource: algae. The Japanese are looking at this green gold: “Microalgae can grow with light, water, carbon dioxide and a small amount of minerals, and their cells divide quickly, meaning that they can be harvested faster than land-based biomasses,” Science Daily says. “Algae can also be harvested all year round, potentially offering a more stable energy supply.”Sperm therapy. To get ingredients to a female with cancerous tumors, why not imitate one of nature’s best delivery systems? Phys.org reports that German scientists are developing steerable sperm to do just that. They coax the expert swimming cells into little iron helmets, then steer them where they want them to swim. There are problems with the concept, though; how to shed the helmets after delivery, “And then there is the problem of obtaining the sperm.” There will undoubtedly be volunteers.Borrowing from nature is an age-old theme in science.Improving on nature? An article on Phys.org claims that a new technology is “better than nature” – “artificial biofilm increases energy production in microbial fuel cells.” Well, ‘better’ is relative to the function at hand. If biofilms were meant to generate electricity, the researchers at University of Bayreuth could boast. By combining a gel substance with the bacteria, the scientists got more electrical output than previous attempts with the bacteria alone.The following six papers are more technical for those interested.Bio-inspired Murray materials for mass transfer and activity (Nature Communications). Scientists build on nature’s hierarchical designs for applications needing to move mass. Why? “Natural systems and their hierarchical organization are not only optimized and designed for durability but also have the capability to adapt to their external environment, to undergo self-repair, and to perform many highly complex functions.”Reproducing the hierarchy of disorder for Morpho-inspired, broad-angle color reflection (Nature Scientific Reports). The brilliant blue Morpho butterfly returns to the biomimetics stage in the paper. Praise for the design gets mixed with long-age credulity in the opening sentences: “Intricate structures create structural colors that can remain brilliant after millions of years of fossilization. One of the most well-known examples is the butterflies of genus Morpho whose bright, blue wings grace many famous collections, and are reported to be visible even from low-flying aircrafts [sic].”Structural features and lipid binding domain of tubulin on biomimetic mitochondrial membranes (PNAS). Tubulin is not just a protein component of the cytoskeleton; it is also “a highly unexpected component of mitochondrial membranes involved in regulation of membrane permeability,” this paper says. The authors are studying its interaction with membrane proteins, knowing this will be “important for the structure-inspired design of tubulin-targeting agents.”A living mesoscopic cellular automaton made of skin scales (Nature). Theoretical cellular automata, famously conceived by John von Neumann, are realized in—of all things—lizard skin. Nature (that is, biology, not the journal) had it first. But does Nature‘s evolutionary reference compute?Here we show that in ocellated lizards a quasi-hexagonal lattice of skin scales, rather than individual chromatophore cells, establishes a green and black labyrinthine pattern of skin colour. We analysed time series of lizard scale colour dynamics over four years of their development and demonstrate that this pattern is produced by a cellular automaton (a grid of elements whose states are iterated according to a set of rules based on the states of neighbouring elements) that dynamically computes the colour states of individual mesoscopic skin scales to produce the corresponding macroscopic colour pattern. Using numerical simulations and mathematical derivation, we identify how a discrete von Neumann cellular automaton emerges from a continuous Turing reaction–diffusion system. Skin thickness variation generated by three-dimensional morphogenesis of skin scales causes the underlying reaction–diffusion dynamics to separate into microscopic and mesoscopic spatial scales, the latter generating a cellular automaton. Our study indicates that cellular automata are not merely abstract computational systems, but can directly correspond to processes generated by biological evolution.Biomimetic supercontainers for size-selective electrochemical sensing of molecular ions (Nature Scientific Reports). This paper describes how “the unique structure of spherical viruses” is  inspiring the construction of nano-containers for storage and sensing applications.Biomimetic catalytic transformation of toxic α-oxoaldehydes to high-value chiral α-hydroxythioesters using artificial glyoxalase I (Nature Communications). This paper describes attempts to mimic enzymes for maintaining handedness in pharmaceuticals. Once again, the authors tip the hat to Darwin: “Nature has evolved a wealth of proteins called enzymes that catalyse the chemical reactions necessary to sustain all life on Earth.” How nature “evolved” these capabilities is never explained.Show these articles to those who think Darwin owns science and intelligent design is religion. Nothing could be farther from the truth. If anything, the religion in these instances is Darwinism, taking it on faith that “nature” works miracles, achieving what our best scientists and engineers are struggling to imitate.Parents: get your kid a Science Fair award! Find a natural design he or she can imitate and learn about, coming up with a useful application. It will be sure to turn the judge’s heads. (Just don’t use the forbidden phrase “intelligent design” in a public school. We don’t want your kid to get Expelled.) Borrowing from nature is an age-old theme in science. Form and function go hand-in-hand in the natural world and the structures created by plants and animals are only rarely improved on by humans. If these designs are so good that intelligent minds want to mimic them, who can believe they emerged by chance?Falcon aircraft: With eyes like lasers, wings for speed, and talons for capture, a peregrine falcon swoops down unerringly for its prey at speeds approaching 200mph—even in high winds. No wonder Phys.org reports that “research work on how falcons fly is inspiring new technologies for aircraft that could contribute to their safety in the air, aerodynamics and fuel efficiency.” But even after over a century of flight design, human engineers probably won’t get close to the falcon’s abilities for another two decades. The article includes this infographic from BAE systems:The article ends with this remark by a specialist in air flow control in military aircraft: “Bio-inspiration is not a new concept; many technologies that we use every day are increasingly inspired by animals and nature.”Cheetah robot.  “University of Twente researcher Geert Folkertsma has developed a prototype cheetah robot,” Science Daily reports. “Folkertsma has dedicated four years of research and development to constructing a scaled-down robotic version of the fastest land animal in the world, with a view to replicating its movements.” To try to replicate the cat’s movements, the PhD student “studied extensive video footage of cheetahs,” the article says.Honeybee cleaners. The life of a honeybee seems like it would be a messy job: getting covered with pollen dust all the day long, even in the eyes. And yet they keep their hairs neat and clean. How? The spacing of the hairs seems to be a key, says Phys.org. The Bioneers at Georgia Tech are onto the case. They found that bees also come equipped with cleaning tools and the training to use them.“Bees have a preprogrammed cleaning routine that doesn’t vary,” said Marguerite Matherne, a Ph.D. student in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering. “Even if they’re not very dirty in the first place, bees always swipe their eyes a dozen times, six times per leg. The first swipe is the most efficient, and they never have to brush the same area of the eye twice.”A mechanical engineer at the school says, “Our findings may also be used to create mechanical designs that help keep micro and nanostructured surfaces clean.”Honeybee robot eyes: Speaking of honeybees, Science Daily says, “Honey bees have sharper eyesight than we thought.” They didn’t specify who “we” is, but they quickly inspire the reader with details about how scientists at the University of Adelaide are applying the new knowledge to the design of sharper eyes for robots. “Bees have much better vision than was previously known, offering new insights into the lives of honey bees, and new opportunities for translating this knowledge into fields such as robot vision, outlines a new study.”Fern batteries. Storing energy from solar cells is a major challenge. You can’t charge the cells at night, so how do you maintain the day’s energy collection? Scientists at RMIT University (Australia) are looking to Americans for answers – to American fern plants, that is – for “bio-inspired” answers to fast charging. The secret is in fractals: subdivisions of subdivisions of subdivisions in the leaves of the western swordfern. “Our electrode is based on these fractal shapes – which are self-replicating, like the mini structures within snowflakes – and we’ve used this naturally-efficient design to improve solar energy storage at a nano level,” they say. The fern-mimic electrode could “boost the capacity of existing integrable storage technologies by 3000 per cent. Watch for it in smartphones, laptops, cars, and buildings.Seaweed superconductors. Speaking of energy storage, ditch the graphite. Cease the lithium-ion pollution. There’s a greener way: use seaweed, say American scientists. Phys.org explains that when chelated, seaweed takes on an egg-box structure that magnifies the energy storage potential of batteries. “Testing showed that the seaweed-derived material had a large reversible capacity of 625 milliampere hours per gram (mAhg-1), which is considerably more than the 372 mAhg-1 capacity of traditional graphite anodes for lithium-ion batteries,” the article says. This could double the range of electric cars, while exploiting a cheap, renewable resource.Bat sonar. Echolocation in a certain species of bat seems to get enhanced when they wiggle their noses and ears. The evidence seems clear; bats have “extraordinary accuracy” at finding what they need in the dark. Virginia Tech engineers have taken notice, wondering if that could improve man-made sonar systems. The techs built a model with the new wiggle technique and found that it improved signal to noise by a factor of 100 to 1000. “Bat echolocation is one of nature’s remarkable achievements in navigation,” the article on Phys.org says, making this interesting admission: “That suggests that bolstering sensor capability by using a dynamic, mobile emitter and receiver should be translatable to engineered systems less complex than real bats, improving the navigation of autonomous drones and the accuracy of devices for speech recognition.”For Bat Appreciation Day (April 17), National Geographic posted “16 Incredible Pictures Show the Beauty of Bats.”Parsley scaffolds. Getting stem cells to grow where you want them is a challenge. Phys.org explains how some scientists are succeeding with plant materials. In the process, the scientists make a good statement about the value of living models:center_img (Visited 242 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

IPL 2011: Chennai Super Kings vs Kolkata Knight Riders- CSK win by 2 runs

first_imgChennai beat Kolkata by two runs in the nail-biting first match of the Indian Premier League at the MA Chidambaram Stadium in Chennai on Friday. Score Kolkata needed four runs from the last ball off Chennai’s Tim Southee. Rajat Bhatia was at receiving end, but a fine Yorker from the Kiwi prevented the batsman from going for big hit and Kolkata went down by two runs.This was a far cry from an earlier situation when the Kolkata team was cruising on 93/1 with Jacques Kallis and Yusuf Pathan at the crease.The Kolkata openers Jacques Kallis and Manvinder Bisla started the chase strongly scoring more than seven runs an over. They were cruising along till left-arm spinner Shadab Jakati scalped Bisla on 27 when the team total was 64. The run rate slowed down a bit but Yusuf Pathan ensured that the delay was short-lived and together with Kallis, he set out hammering the opposition bowlers.But, Pathan too could not stay on for long and fell in the 13th over with a run out written against his initials on the scoreboard. But, the scoreboard kept ticking as Kallis was still in the middle.A few balls later Chennai got the man they wanted. Kallis went for the sweep off offie R Ashwin, but failed to get the desired result and ended up getting caught in the deep by Subramaniam Badrinath. He fell for 54 and Kolkata fell to 112/3.And then it was Suresh Raina’s turn to show his bowling prowess and he did it by removing Kolkata’s English import Eoin Morgan on 6 with Dhoni performing the final rites with fine stumping. Kolkata were reduced to 119/4.advertisementA ball later Chennai pressed further and removed IPL’s most expensive players and Kolkata captain Gautam Gambhir on 1 with a run out. Then Manoj Tiwary, who was charging away at the oppostion bowlers, too was forced to walk back with Sri Lankan offie Suraj Randiv getting the better of his in the 19th over. He fell for 27 when the score was 145.Kolkata team could only manage to score 151/7 on board in their allotted 20 overs and ended up on the losing side.Chennai inningsSrikkanth Anirudha scored an impressive 64 as Chennai put 153/4 in their stipulated 20 overs against Kolkata.Chennai skipper Mahendra Singh Dhoni won the toss and decided to bat, but the things didn’t exactly pan out in the rigth way for his team as opposition spinner Iqbal Abdulla scalped opener Murali Vijay in the first over to reduce them to 5/1.Post that wicket, Srikkanth Anirudha and Suresh Raina got on with a partnership putting a quick 75 for the second wicket before Suresh Raina departed to Yusuf Pathan on 33. The ball was pitched wide on the off and Raina could not connect it properly and gave a catch to Sarabjit Ladda in the deep. Chennai were 80/2 at the stage.In the 18th over, Jacques Kallis scalped Chennai skipper Mahendra Singh Dhoni to restrict them to 129/3. Dhoni, who scored 29 runs, put 49 runs for the third wicket with Anirudha.Finally, on the second ball of the last over Jacques Kallis bowled Anirudha to bring to end an impressive innings that saw the batsman scored a 55-ball 64, decorating his innings with six fours and two sixes.Scott Styris and Albie Morkel helped Chennai were unbeaten when the Chennai innings came to an end on 153/4.The opening ceremonyEarlier, the opening ceremony of the fourth edition of the mega cricketing event saw the King of Bollywood Shah Rukh Khan perform in front of a packed MA Chidambaram Stadium. The Kolkata Knight Riders owner wooed audience with his Chakde India to kick start things. Then he went on to do a bit of lip syncing to a Tamil script even as South Indian actress Shriya Saran joined him on the stageThe other Bollywood performer during the ceremony was Sunidhi Chauhan, who sang the popular Hindi number Dhoom Machale.Then there dancers painted in saffron, white and green showcasing their dancing skills to some grooving and heart-racing beats. The evening also witnessed famous percussionist Taufiq Qureshi created some rhythmic melody.last_img read more

Private school finds no exam written by Sidoo son on date alleged

first_imgVANCOUVER — A Vancouver private school has concluded its investigation after an indictment alleged that businessman David Sidoo paid someone to take a high school graduation exam on behalf of his oldest son in 2012.Sidoo was charged with conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud in Massachusetts as part of a prosecution by United States authorities of an alleged college admissions scam involving dozens of accused people.The indictment released Tuesday alleged Sidoo paid $200,000 in total for someone to take the SAT on behalf of both his sons, and that he also paid an undisclosed amount for someone to fly to Vancouver and take the high school exam.St. George’s School says a review of its records from 2012 indicates no school or provincial exams were written at the school by the student in question on or around the date referenced by the indictment.Sidoo is CEO of Advantage Lithium and a former Canadian Football League player for the B.C. Lions and Saskatchewan Roughriders who is also known for his philanthropic causes in the province.Sidoo’s legal team also released a statement on Wednesday saying he intends to plead not guilty at a court appearance in Boston on Friday.“David Sidoo’s children have not been accused of any impropriety and have achieved great accomplishments in their own right,” the statement adds.“We urge the media to recognize that Mr. Sidoo is presumed innocent and that he intends to appear in court Friday, plead not guilty, and exercise his right to defend himself against the current accusation.”The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Pscholka receives AG Award from MSU Extension

first_imgState Rep. Al Pscholka (LEFT), R-Stevensville, is pictured with MSU Extension director Tom Coon. Pscholka was honored by Michigan State University Extension with its Key Partner Award for 2013. Pscholka received the award this week at the group’s annual conference at the Kellogg Center in Lansing.State Rep. Al Pscholka, R-Stevensville, was honored by Michigan State University Extension with its Key Partner Award for 2013.  Pscholka received the award this week at the group’s annual conference at the Kellogg Center in Lansing.“During development of the budget for 2014, Representative Pscholka made sure that Extension services and agricultural research were given the same consideration as the rest of higher education,” said Tom Coon, director of MSU Extension.“Representative Pscholka in hearings and testimony discussed the importance of agricultural research and Extension to growers in his district.  He made sure funding was strengthened to make sure the needs of farmers and agricultural consumers were met,” Coon said.  “Leaders like Representative Pscholka, who remember our programs at critical times, help to ensure we’ll be positioned to continue serving the needs of Michigan’s food and agricultural industries well into the future.”Pscholka, chairman of Higher Education Appropriations Subcommittee, said “Research and the Extension are important to the quality of life in Southwest Michigan.  Agriculture not only has a huge impact on our economy, it is part of our heritage,” Pscholka said.  “The services provided by MSU research and Extension are invaluable to our local growers who depend on top notch research, science, and services.”Pscholka was nominated earlier this year by an employee of MSU Extension.“I look forward to working on policies that will help agriculture grow and prosper in our corner of Michigan and across the state,” Pscholka said.-30- Categories: News 23Oct Pscholka receives AG Award from MSU Extensionlast_img read more

Rep Calley plans local office hours on Jan 22

first_img09Jan Rep. Calley plans local office hours on Jan. 22 Categories: Calley News State Rep. Julie Calley welcomes residents to office hours in two communities on Monday, Jan. 22.Rep. Calley, of Portland, will give a legislative update to attendees. Then, if residents have individual concerns, she will take one on one meetings.Rep. Calley will meet with constituents at the following locations:The Village of Middleville, 100 East Main St., Middleville, from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.; andThe Barry County Courthouse, Commissioners’ Chambers, 220 W. State St., Hastings, from 1 to 2:30 p.m.“Accountable representation requires consistent feedback,” Rep. Calley said. “Office hours present an opportunity for productive dialogue with those whom I serve.”No appointment is necessary. Residents unable to attend scheduled office hours may send their questions and ideas to Rep. Calley via email at [email protected] or by calling her at 517-373-0842.last_img read more

The YahSat 1B satellite was successfully launched

first_imgThe YahSat 1B satellite was successfully launched from Baikonur onboard a Proton-M launcher on Monday night.The satellite, owned by UAE-based YahSat, which includes a Ka-band payload, will provide services to customers in the Middle East, Africa, Europe and south-western Asia. YahSat 1A was launched last year from French Guiana onboard an Ariane 5 rocket.last_img