PVL: FEU takes no. 1 after quick win over San Sebastian

first_imgPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netFar Eastern University made quick work of San Sebastian, 25-15, 25-22, 25-18, to gain solo lead in the Premier Volleyball League Collegiate Conference Saturday at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.It was a collective effort for the undefeated Lady Tamaraws, who rolled to their third straight win.ADVERTISEMENT DepEd’s Taal challenge: 30K students displaced Palace OKs total deployment ban on Kuwait OFWs Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Report: Disney dropping the ‘Fox’ from movie studio names MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lacson: Calamity fund cut; where did P4 billion go? ONE: Aoki waylays Wiratchai, Gracie triumphant in return fightcenter_img Putin’s, Xi’s ruler-for-life moves pose challenges to West Sofia Sarmiento had seven points for the Lady Stags, who dropped to 0-2.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ ‘High crimes and misdemeanors’: Trump impeachment trial begins View comments “I can see the progression of the team. I’ve been able to give my second six chances to play because my first six are able to control the game,” FEU coach George Pascua said in Filipino.“The performance of my team is steadily improving and I just hope that we maintain it.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’The win pulled FEU ahead of idle University of Santo Tomas in the standings. The Tigresses currently own a 2-0 mark.Heather Guino-o posted a game-high nine points while Celine Domingo and Jeanette Villareal added eight points apiece. Trump assembles a made-for-TV impeachment defense teamlast_img read more

Almost €600,000 granted for campus upgrades at LYIT

first_imgMinister for Education and Skills Joe McHugh has today announced €590,000 funding for Letterkenny Institute of Technology to make infrastructure works and improvements.The investment is based on student numbers with more than 3,000 students in the college.The Donegal TD said: “The €590,000 funding is priority investment as it helps college chiefs to make small but important fixes and improvements to the campus for the benefit of staff and students. “The money also helps to pay for better equipment and upgrade some facilities with refurb jobs, new IT, energy efficiency and health and safety changes.“It also complements the wider investment in third level facilities with €2.2 billion being spent across the sector from 2018-2027 in new buildings, better labs and learning spaces and other areas.“LYIT can be assured that there’s good flexibility with this Government support of €590,000 and they can decide how best to make changes on campus.”The funding will be provided to LYIT through the Higher Education Authority (HEA). Almost €600,000 granted for campus upgrades at LYIT was last modified: December 11th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:educationfundingLYITMinister Joe McHughlast_img read more

Drive to make 2010 spectacular

first_imgKeynote speaker Sibusiso Ndebele,Minister of Transport, is adamant that theWorld Cup will unite the nation.(Image: Nicky Rehbok)MEDIA CONTACTS • Tiyani RikhotsoGCIS Chief Director: 2010 Fifa World Cup+27 12 314 2834• Margaret DingaloIMC Director: Stakeholder Relations+27 11 483 0122USEFUL LINKS• GCIS• Brand South Africa• National Communication Partnership• South African Police Service• South Africa: 2010• Fifa 2010 World CupJanine ErasmusThe fourth and final edition of the 2010 National Communication Partnership Conference saw communications experts from the private and public sector pledging to use their Confederations Cup experience to deliver an outstanding 2010 Fifa World Cup.The football spectacular kicks off on 11 June 2010 and ends 30 days later.The one-day conference was an initiative of the International Marketing Council (IMC) and Government Communications and Information System (GCIS).It aimed to provide professional communicators with the tools to launch an intensified and coordinated 2010 strategy, which will reach as many people as possible and set off a wave of excitement and support that will sweep the entire continent.“The World Cup is South Africa’s next defining moment,” said acting IMC CEO Paul Bannister in his welcoming address. “This is going to influence how the rest of the world looks at us from now on. We have to get it right – who knows when the next defining moment will be?”Among the issues discussed were the safety and security of fans, the mobilisation of people across the continent, and the increased use of tools, such as the diski dance and the national anthem, to build excitement and national cohesion.The diski dance is as unique a facet of South African football as is the vuvuzela and the makarapa (a somewhat modified hard hat). The dance borrows much of its style from the Beautiful Game, and with moves like the Header, the Juggle and the Table Mountain, it is as infectious as the spirit of optimism that is fast pervading the nation.Safety firstMinister of Transport Sibusiso Ndebele said in his keynote address that his department’s prime responsibility is to get fans to the stadiums safely and on time, and back to their hotels afterwards.With around 500 000 fans expected to pour into the country during June and July 2010, said Ndebele, the safety of both citizens and visitors is non-negotiable.A tighter national strategy and better coordination between national and provincial government, he said, will assure fans of a secure environment. Part of this tighter strategy included the establishment of a single command structure to run the entire plan.Ndebele praised South Africa’s law enforcement agencies, saying that they have proven their capability during previous international sporting events. “They will continue to improve on their capacity to deal with crime incidents and will be ready to neutralise any potential threat.”He added that his department is waiting for Fifa’s final draw, which takes place on 4 December 2009. “Then we will have a better idea of where the big crowds will be and can plan accordingly, especially for the smaller metropolitan areas that may not be fully equipped to deal with huge crowds.”The transport department’s 2010 strategy involves a combination of various modes of transport including buses, trains and taxis.Negotiations with the local minibus taxi sector, which earlier in 2009 protested over the Rea Vaya bus rapid transport system, were continuing, but the minister expected a positive outcome.“Rea Vaya will go ahead,” he affirmed. “There is no turning back.”Feedback from the Confederations Cup, he said, was mostly positive but aspects such as the park and ride system still needed attention. These will not be neglected, he added.Marketing opportunityLocal Organising Committee (LOC) chair Irvin Khoza encouraged the country to make the most of the forthcoming extravaganza, and to understand the enormity of the project.“We won’t get another marketing opportunity like in this in the next 100 years,” he said, referring to the chance to promote South Africa in all its diversity to the international community.With the Confederations Cup now behind them, he said, the focus is firmly on the big event and communication must move into top gear. “We need to feel that the show is in town. This is the real deal.”Khoza likened the upcoming World Cup to a television commercial for South Africa, except that its duration is 30 days instead of 30 seconds.“This commercial will be watched by billions around the globe,” said Khoza, “and it is our chance to present South Africa as a dynamic and exciting place to visit”.Khoza said that the biggest legacy of the 2010 Fifa World Cup, besides national pride, skills development, better infrastructure and more, would be to bury what he termed “Afro-pessimism”, and show that South Africa is on a par with developed nations in this sphere.He also urged South Africans to support all six African teams, and to shift support to a team from Africa should national team Bafana Bafana fail to make it to the later stages.Panel discussionsThe conference featured two panel discussions, chaired by TV veteran Jeremy Maggs and Paul Bannister respectively.The first session, centred on Confederations Cup feedback, featured transport minister Sibusiso Ndebele; Sindiswa Nhlumayo, deputy director-general in the Department of Tourism; Ron DelMont of Fifa’s local office; LOC marketing chief Derek Carstens; Gab Mampone, acting CEO of the embattled South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC); and assistant police commissioner Ben Groenewald.Each assured the audience that their departments and organisations were hard at work to address the flaws revealed during the Confederations Cup.Ndebele promised that the park and ride system would be overhauled, and that there would be smoother coordination between the various transport modes.Nhlumayo said the focus of her department would be on service excellence.“We want those 500 000 visitors to go home and become ambassadors for South Africa,” she said. “In this way we will penetrate markets we have not yet reached.”She mentioned that the tourism department had enlisted the help of the Disney Institute, the professional development and training arm of the Walt Disney Company, to conduct research, identify the weak spots and implement best practices across all service areas.She also announced the October 2009 launch of the National Service Excellence Initiative. This is a private-public partnership with the Tourism Business Council of South Africa to develop greater levels of service excellence, thereby increasing the sector’s US$19.7-billion (R159-billion) contribution to the South African economy, and ensuring its global competitiveness.South African Police Service (SAPS) assistant commissioner Groenewald stated emphatically that fans would be safe. The dry run of the Confederations Cup was a big success overall, he said, although there were a few critical areas that needed attention. Lack of communication and not enough standard operating procedures were identified as shortcomings that would be addressed.Fifa’s DelMont said the organisation was happy with the progress to date. He mentioned that although four stadiums were used for the Confederations Cup, there remained another six untried stadiums around the country. DelMont encouraged the six host cities to follow the example of the Nelson Mandela Bay municipality, which hosted events in its brand-new stadium before the Confederations Cup, and was therefore able to assess its performance in a live situation.Derek Carstens of the LOC reported that crucial targets for the Confederations Cup had been met. As an example, he said that ticket sales for the South African event had matched that of Germany, and in a world recession to boot.The LOC is also awaiting the final Fifa draw in December, said Carstens. “Then we will start driving hard.”Mampone of the SABC assured all present that the organisation would deliver on its promises. “Our plans are well advanced, and the resources we will need had been set aside a long time ago.”In broadcasting terms, he said, the Confederations Cup saw excellence all around, with over 200 countries receiving consistent high-quality signals.World media perceptionBetween panel sessions, the audience watched presentations by Wadim Schreiner of Media Tenor SA and Jos Kuper of Kuper Research.Schreiner spoke on the world media perception of South Africa and the 2010 Fifa World Cup, obtained through a survey of 42 countries across June and July 2009. Research revealed that, while recent strike action had dented the country’s image slightly, on the whole South Africa had recovered from its lowest point in May 2008 during the xenophobia attacks.He said it was likely that South Africa would receive strong international media attention from now until June 2010.Kuper reported that active engagement through, for example, the diski dance and the national anthem was crucial in order to stir up 2010 fever among South Africans.Igniting the nationThe second panel discussion, hosted by Paul Bannister, carried the theme Igniting the nation to deliver.Panellists included Rich Mkhondo and Derek Carstens of the LOC; Mvuzo Mbebe of the SABC; Wendy Tlou of South African Tourism; Kwakye Donkor of the Regional Tourism Organisation of Southern Africa; Themba Maseko of GCIS; Vish Naidoo of the South African Police Services; German branding guru Nikolaus Eberl; and David Smith of the Foreign Correspondents Association.All agreed that a multi-faceted strategy was necessary to galvanise the nation. Early and effective communication was needed, not only to reach the thousands of visitors but also the expected 18 000 media professionals.“We don’t want them to report on just the football while they’re here,” said Mkhondo.Maseko of GCIS agreed that communication was the key to delivering the best World Cup ever.“We need to develop an appropriate and resounding communication strategy,” he commented. “As government, we have set up a number of structures to enhance our marketing and communication plan and to ensure that government speaks in one voice.”To overcome communication and cultural barriers, said Naidoo, the SAPS plans to enlist police officers from other countries and bring them to South Africa to visibly patrol in their uniforms. This will help the SAPS to effectively police foreign nationals.UK journalist Smith commented that while the controversial issue of a “Plan B” host was over, the question of South Africa’s readiness was yet to be firmly established in the UK. “This is because we didn’t have a team in the Confederations Cup and there wasn’t much coverage,” he said.Smith encouraged the local media to accentuate the positives, but to be truthful about any shortcomings.The way forwardThe second part of the conference included four breakout sessions under the themes: domestic mobilisation, tourism, communication, and continental mobilisation. During the sessions participants pooled their ideas for boosting South Africa’s brand.The communication group decided to strengthen existing campaigns, and to integrate them in order to promote a positive attitude. For instance, the Football Friday strategy adopted by hotel group Southern Sun could be developed into a national event to be held later in the year.Getting the country behind the national football team, anthem, and flag were important elements of domestic mobilisation. The group also suggested the composition of a 2010 song.Continental mobilisation would benefit from better communication and wider access to information, it was decided. South African embassies abroad need more information, possibly in the form of an information package which could be easily distributed. It was suggested that other key events across the continent could be linked to the World Cup.The tourism group concluded that the diski dance and Fly the Flag for Football campaigns need to be used more extensively, in order to entrench them in the nation’s consciousness. It was suggested that the dance be taken to schools and performed at every domestic football game from now on.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Contact Janine Erasmus at [email protected]last_img read more

Video: How to do the diski dance

first_imgStart learning the soccer-based moves of South Africa’s diski dance and you’ll start feeling the rhythm of African football – and the energy and passion that’s in store for the world at the 2010 Fifa World Cup.last_img

Tony Award for SA puppet company

first_img9 May 2011South Africa’s Handspring Puppet Company has won a coveted Tony Award for the life-size puppets that are at the heart of the highly acclaimed West End and Broadway play War Horse.The Cape Town-based company has already accepted the honour for the 2011 Tony Awards taking place later this year. The award was an exclusive one, meaning that no other puppet-making companies were eligible for it.Basil Jones, Handspring co-founder, said: “It was wonderful to be able to announce it on the factory floor.”The award will be presented to the company on 12 June 2011 at the 65th Annual Tony Awards ceremony.Another South African export, world-renowned playwright Athol Fugard, will be honoured with a lifetime achievement award at the ceremony.Horses at warThe life-size cane and plywood horses used for the play War Horse have earned the puppet company kudos for its contribution to the creative industry. The play has received five Tony nominations – for best play, best direction, best scenic design, best lighting design, and best sound design.The play, which premiered at London’s National Theatre in 2007 and started its Broadway run in April 2011, depicts the story of a boy’s horse taken by the British cavalry to participate in World War One. It is based on the 1982 novel of the same name, written by British poet, playwright and children’s author Michael Morpurgo.Jones said: “The roots of War Horse were in a production called Tall Horse that Handspring did with a Malian puppet company and which a National Theatre creative team saw in South Africa.“We had hoped the National Theatre would take Tall Horse, which featured a giraffe, to London, but instead they came to Handspring with a proposal to do work based on animals and war.”The horses were made by a team of 12 craftsmen using durable material to make sure the wear and tear of the horses didn’t affect the play during its running.The original set of horses lasted for 1 000 performances and didn’t need professional puppeteers to work them, although Handspring sent a puppeteer to help during the first season of the play.For its use of these magnificent creations, the London run of War Horse won an Olivier Award, an Evening Standard Theatre Award and the London Critics’ Circle Theatre Award for design.Creative collaborationThe 30-year-old puppet company has collaborated with many innovative South Africans in the creative industry, including theatre directors Malcolm Purkey and Barney Simon and renowned painter, filmmaker and director William Kentridge.Kentridge, who has worked closely with the company, said: “Audiences see the puppeteers at work in pieces like War Horse, but you can’t stop yourself believing the reality of those horses, it’s kind of magical.“I think it’s fantastic that their years of work and their extraordinary skill get this recognition.”Kentridge and Handspring first collaborated in 1992 on a play based on German playwright Georg Buchner’s Woyzeck on the Highveld.Awarding theatrical excellenceThe Tony Awards were established in 1947 after the American Theatre Wing sought a way to award those who excelled in theatre.The Tony Award is regarded in the arts industry as theatre’s most prestigious accolade.The awards were named after Antoinette Perry, an actress, director, producer and philanthropist, who was the leader of the American Theatre Wing during World War Two and had recently passed.Although the Tonys were established in 1947, for the first two years of the awards there was no medallion to go with the award.The medallion was design by Herman Rosse in 1949, after the designers union, United Scenic Artists, sponsored a medallion design contest, and has been used ever since.First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

Pint-sized Zuriel Oduwole sets her cap for success

first_imgFrom making documentaries about Africa to touring the world and interviewing global leaders, encouraging education for girls and starting on writing a book, Zuriel Oduwole has done a lot. But here’s the catch – she is only 12 years old. Zuriel Oduwole is a young documentary filmmaker who wants to change negative perceptions of Africa. (Image: Facebook) • Kumoodi: from Lagos to the world • Watch: Salif Keita and Black Mambazo call for harmony in Africa • Powerful women shape Africa • African entrepreneur sold his belongings to start Kisua • All about the African Union Priya Pitamber Most 12-year-olds are occupied with going to school and chilling with their friends; but Zuriel Oduwole stands out from this crowd. Her documentary filmmaking skills have led her to interview 14 heads of state and she has visited various countries where her documentaries have been screened.Zuriel’s father is Nigerian, and her mother is Mauritian, but she was born in California.Her passion lies with Africa, however, and the perception the rest of the world has of the continent.“I wanted to do it [film and documentaries] because there is power in media and also I wanted to show positive things of the African continent to the rest of the world because usually whenever they talk about Africa, they portray it as a continent of negative things,” she explains.“But because I lived in Africa for a period of time, I see a lot of positive things.” She introduces herself as a proud pan-African child, in the ninth grade at school. “I am working hard to do my school projects, play in my basketball league, and still do what I enjoy a lot – like my extracurricular activities of interviewing world leaders, making compelling documentaries, and inspiring girls around the world to dream bigger, much bigger.”A serendipitous startHer passion for making films was ignited in 2012 when she entered a documentary-making competition with The Ghana Revolution. “After this first foray into filmmaking, Zuriel was bitten by the director’s bug and quickly wanted to make more movies,” stated US news site CNN. “She turned to the web to find the tools she needed and got involved in the entire filmmaking process.”Quite a bit of training was needed to learn how to make a video. “My mum taught me how to use different software first, like how to edit things, how to add animations, how to put in fades, transitions and all those things but I am glad I had the time to learn it,” Zuriel said.Her second project, Educating and Healing Africa Out of Poverty, it looked at the formation of the African Union in 1963. Another interest, education, was examined in Technology in Educational Development. Her latest series, A Promising Africa, profiles five African countries, beginning with her father’s homeland, Nigeria. Zuriel has visited several countries to attend screenings of her documentaries, including South Africa. Sawubona !! South Africa Movie Premier this week. Hello everyone. My most busy week in my entire life. Arrived South… Posted by Zuriel Oduwole on Saturday, 21 March 2015Left Paris to Tokyo. Got spolit a lot. Showing my film here next week/ Educate A Girl 2 see what she can do. Thankful pic.twitter.com/JUwCReEsBc — Zuriel Oduwole (@ZurielOduwole) March 28, 2015“I’ve interviewed 14 heads of state and a few of those include the presidents of Tanzania, Liberia, Kenya, South Sudan, Nigeria and Cape Verde, to name a few,” she told CNN. “I’ve also been able to interview business leaders like my friend Mr Aliko Dangote.”The list of people interviewed by the 12-year-old is impressive: • Jerry John Rawlings (Ghana) • John Kufour (Ghana) • Joyce Banda (Malawi) • Jakaya Kikwete (Tanzania) • Rajkeswur Purryag (Mauritius) • Uhuru Kenyatta (Kenya) • Goodluck Johnathan (Nigeria) • Salva Kirr Mayardit (South Sudan) • Ellen Johnson Sirleaf (Liberia) • Jorge Fonseco (Cape Verde) • Portia Simpson Miller (Jamaica) • Thomas Thabane (Lesotho) • Ralph Gonsalves (St Vincent & Grenadines) • Denzil Douglas (St Kitts & Nevis) Education and empowermentThe importance of education is Zuriel’s other passion. She visits schools and gives talks on its value through her Dream Up, Speak Up, Stand Up programme. So far, she has reached 21 000 children in nine countries.“The reason I do it is because I want them to see that education is very important in life and I want to show them here is an example,” she said, pointing to herself, “and show them what they can do if they are educated, and if they are focused in life and have goals.”Not every girl was able to get an education or a chance to accomplish her dreams. “My vision is to see that this changes one day, and my mission is to use my Dream Up, Speak Up, Stand Up programme and other new ideas to inspire girls to accomplish this mission.”Speaking to CNN, she pointed out that in Africa, boys were the first to receive an education. “The boys go to school and get an education while the girls stay at home,” she explained, “And those girls aren’t educated and have fewer options in life when they get older.”In Accra Ghana 2day with kids at De Young school – Nima. We hung out, talked education and documentary. They are cool pic.twitter.com/u7TKKxQt6T — Zuriel Oduwole (@ZurielOduwole) March 26, 2015Varied interestsBesides filmmaking, Zuriel has a variety of hobbies, such as playing sport and reading. She is part of a basketball league, she plays soccer and is on the athletics team, and she does hip-hop dancing with her sisters.Reading helps her to improve her vocabulary. “I love reading National Geographic Kids Magazines,” she writes on her website. “I also love adventure and spy novels. I have started to write my own book which I hope to publish next year.”Global recognitionZuriel was the youngest recipient of the Governors Gold Medal Award and was featured in the American business magazine, Forbes, when she was 10 years old. The Canadian edition of the women’s magazine, Elle, put her on its list of 33 Women Who Changed The World in 2014.She has also appeared in numerous television interviews, including with BBC TV in London, CNBC Africa, and the SABC in Johannesburg.Premiered my film A Promising Africa in Johannesburg, Attended SAFTA, guest on CNBC, SABC Morning LIVE #LetGirlsLearn pic.twitter.com/O68D9ThEM3 — Zuriel Oduwole (@ZurielOduwole) March 21, 2015last_img read more

California’s Energy Code Update: Ready, Set, Wait

first_imgThere aren’t many aspects of private-sector enterprise or government operations that don’t rely on software to make things happen. Just ask the California Energy Commission.August 1 was to be the day the 2008 Building Energy Efficiency Standards – parts 1 and 6 of Title 24, the California Building Standards Code – became effective. But a delay in the rollout of proprietary software that building industry professionals will use to assure they are complying with the code has, in turn, prompted the commission to shift the effective date to January 1, 2010.That’s not necessarily a bad thing. Most of California’s building industry has acclimated to the state’s progression of increasingly strict building regulations and many in the business had long ago geared up for the Title 24 update. And code in some municipalities already exceeds that of Title 24.The next edition of the code is intended to increase the energy efficiency of retrofits, renovations, and new construction 15% to 20% over Title 24 requirements set in 2005. Title 24 has 12 parts, each of which addresses a construction category or set of administrative regulations. Even after January 1, compliance with some of Title 24’s green provisions – pertaining to site development, water conservation, sustainable building materials, and waste recycling – will continue to be voluntary for the next year or two.More time to gear upA delay of five months is, as the CEC points out, not necessarily a bad thing, because it “provides the industry and building officials more time to prepare for the new standards” and gives the CEC “additional time to provide more information for the standards and work with the California utilities, building industry and the California building officials to provide training on the new standards.”Also, CEC compliance software that doesn’t perform as required could cause significant problems for the state’s building industry.“The inspectors have to be trained. They have to train the architects and engineers that are going to work with (the software),” Fred Bell, executive director of the Building Industry Association’s Desert Chapter, told the Desert Sun newspaper for a recent story on the subject. “There are components that have to be manufactured (to code) — air conditioning, ducts. Building is manufacturing. When you have a challenge in one area, there’s a ripple effect through everything else.”last_img read more

Apple wants you to pay big for their smart speaker

first_imgRelated Posts Cate Lawrence Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces As part of yesterday’s WorldWide Developer Conference (WWDC) Google launched their foray into home connectivity with the HomePad called by Apple CEO Tim Cook, “breakthrough home speaker with amazing sound and incredible intelligence that will reinvent home audio.”Don’t overlook the last word, in his statement, despite the desire some will have to group HomePad with voice activatedAmazon Echo and Google Home, the product really belongs in a separate category, and here’s why.It’s about sound, not just smarts The HomePod is a 7-inch tall smart speaker covered in a “seamless 3D mesh” fabric It contains a four-inch subwoofer According to Apple it ” uses an advanced algorithm that continuously analyzes the music and dynamically tunes the low frequencies for smooth, distortion‑free sound.” This includes “seven beamforming tweeters” that possess spatial awareness and direct the sound beams throughout the room. It automatically analyzes the acoustics, adjusting the sound based on the speaker’s location, and steers the music in the optimal direction. According to Tim Cook: “Just like with portable music, we want to reinvent home music.”If we position the product as a smart speaker (albeit voice activated) it’s a healthy competitor to the sound audio systems already manufactured by Sonos and Bose and sits in their price range.“ According to Philip Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of Worldwide Marketing:“Apple reinvented portable music with iPod and now HomePod will reinvent how we enjoy music wirelessly throughout our homes. HomePod packs powerful speaker technology, Siri intelligence and wireless access to the entire Apple Music library into a beautiful speaker that is less than 7 inches tall, can rock most any room with distortion-free music and be a helpful assistant around your home.” IYou can also link the device with other HomePods or speakers in the house that are AirPlay 2-compatible to get surround sound.It’s Apple-priceyWith Google Home retailing for $129 and Amazon Echo: $179, Apple’s HomePod is an outlier priced at $349, making it less compelling to those who either already own a smart home assistant or consider buying one in the future. Whilst many may have grown up with an iPod, iPhone or MacBook, affordability matters, and beyond this wedded to the cult of Mac, people won’t automatically turn to Apple when there are products like Alexa and Siri that are already enmeshed in popular culture. Even if you don’t own one, most people have seen the ads and know what they can do.See also: Apple’s HomeKit gets big upgrade at WWDC16HomePod is to be launched in December in the UK, US, and Australia, followed by more countries in 2018. Notably, Samsung subsidiary Harman International is intending to launch its own speaker this year in partnership with Microsoft.   The speaker will be controlled by Microsoft’s digital assistant Cortana and will enable a range of tasks including playing music, managing calendars and accessing news, similar to the functions possible on Amazon and Google’s devices. It’ll also come with Skype integration, allowing people to make phone calls to other Skype-enabled devices.  This growing trend makes it easy to envisage a connected home where voice activation matters more than a screen interface.This growing trend makes it easy to envisage a connected home where voice activation matters more than a screen interface. But in an era where people still compromise sound quality for convenience (who hasn’t listened to music on their phone for ease of access in public or even whilst sitting in bed?) Apple’s going to need a lot more than a fancy speaker to take down the successes already enjoyed by Amazon and Google Home. C’mon Apple, why don’t you really show us what Siri can do? Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… Tags:#Alexa#Amazon#Apple#Connected Devices#Cortana#Google Home#Home Automation#HomePod#Samsung#Siri#smart assistant#WWDC17 Follow the Puck Small Business Cybersecurity Threats and How to…last_img read more

A One Million Dollar Logo

first_imgWhat follows is a true story.The salesperson called his contact after learning that he lost the big opportunity for which he and his company were competing. After a long bid process and a tough competition, the low bidder was awarded the business. The salesperson wanted to understand why his prospect chose the low bidder and what he could have done differently to convey the value that he and his company created.There were four finalists. The first three finalists had prices between 1.7 million dollars and 1.9 million dollars. While $200,000 is no small sum of money, it isn’t enough of a difference to disqualify any of the bids; they’re all reasonable, and they all create value for the client.The low bidder’s price was around $800,000. That gap is too large to understand. There is a major difference in price, and that means there is a major difference in the value being created.The salesperson pressed their prospect to understand how they justified choosing a price so much lower, that the business couldn’t be done for that price. The contact told him this story.The contact called the bidding company and asked them why their price was so much lower. He asked whether they could profitably take the business at that price. The salesperson from the winning company told the contact that they were in fact going to lose approximately $1,000,000 by taking the business, but that it was worth it in order to be able to use the prospective company’s logo in their marketing material. (It is a logo that you would recognize, for sure)Assume a 15% gross margin in this business is customary. The winning bidder needs that logo to equate to $6,650,000 in new business to pay for the $1,000,000 they are losing by taking the business.I am certain that the winning bidder sees this as an investment. How do you see it?QuestionsWhat do large price differences indicate when it comes to quality and service?How do your client’s perceive a very low price? How should they perceive the lowest price?How do you provide your clients with the confidence that you can serve them without showing them logos of the companies you serve? (Not always a bad idea, in my experience)What happens to clients who underinvest in the results they need? What happens to sales organizations that don’t capture enough of the value they create to serve their clients?Was the logo worth $1,000,000? Will it equate to $6,500,000 in new sales?last_img read more

Khan died of injuries on chest, abdomen

first_imgDairy farmer Pehlu Khan, who was beaten up by a mob of cow vigilantes at Behror in Alwar district last week, died of serious injuries on his chest and lower abdomen, the autopsy report has revealed in its preliminary findings.The 55-year-old farmer from Nuh in Haryana sustained internal injuries on his lungs, while his ribs were broken and blood clots were found near his heart, stated the post-mortem report prepared by a four-member team of doctors and medical jurists. “It appears prima facie that Pehlu Khan died of internal injuries and heavy bleeding. The medical team has asked for viscera analysis for submitting its final report,” Alwar superintendent of police Rahul Prakash told The Hindu on Friday.The three accused — Vipin Yadav, Ravindra Yadav and Kalu Ram Yadav — who were arrested on Wednesday on the basis of video footage of the incident, were produced before the Additional Chief Judicial Magistrate in Behror on the expiry of their one-day police remand. The court sent them to judicial custody for 14 days.Hunt on for 10 moreMr. Prakash said the police had identified 10 more accused persons in the case after establishing their presence on the spot from the video footage circulated on social media. Their names have been added to the FIR registered initially against six suspects on charge of murder and other offences. Three special teams of police officers were searching for the accused, who had fled their homes, and were conducting raids at their suspected hideouts, said the Superintendent of Police.Civil rights groups have sought immediate intervention of Chief Minister Vasundhara Raje to stop the “lawlessness and free run” given to cow vigilantes allegedly with the support of many people in high places.Asking whether the law and order machinery had been handed over by the police to the cow protection vigilante groups, the People’s Union for Civil Liberties said if this was not stopped, lawlessness would prevail on the streets and the State’s economic foundation would be attacked.Demands of activistsIn a memorandum submitted to Ms. Raje, PUCL State president Kavita Srivastava and other activists demanded immediate arrest of all attackers, suspension of Behror Station House Officer and resignation of Home Minister Gulab Chand Kataria for “openly glorifying and lauding the criminals”.last_img read more