For world tourists, Zagreb, Zadar and Split are the most desirable Croatian eno-gastro destinations

first_imgAccording to a survey conducted by Booking.com, which included Croatia, 75% of world travelers claim that when choosing a destination for their next trip, they prefer to choose destinations recognizable by food and drink. Croatia has long been positioned as one of the highest quality eno-gastro destinations, and according to travelers from Croatia on Booking.com, the best Croatian cities to enjoy food are Zagreb, Zadar and Split.Booking.com is the world’s leading online accommodation booking site that guarantees users the best prices for all types of accommodation – from small private accommodation to luxury five-star accommodation. The website is available in 43 languages, offers more than 1,2 million facilities, including 651.583 holiday homes and covers almost 111 destinations in 227 countries and territories around the world, which speaks volumes about the relativity of this research. By the way, the first places in the top 25 cities in the world that Booking.com recommends for food are Hong Kong, Sao Paulo and Tokyo.The millennial generation, market research says, will most likely combine travel and food because 79% of travelers between the ages of 18 and 34 are considering traveling to a destination known for its gastronomic offer. According to last year’s Booking.com data, one in 10 (8%) respondents traveled last year because of their love of good food, and 7% because of their love of great wine. In the younger population, one in 10 people combine their love of fast, street food with travel, while only 4% of older passengers combine a love of food and travel. The data shows that Asian and South American flavors occupy the best places among the top ten destinations for food lovers, followed by Greece, Australia and Spain. Sao Paulo with Brazilian barbecue and Tokyo, whose restaurants have garnered more Michelin stars than New York and Paris combined, occupy the very top of the list.According to Booking.com, in Zagreb, travelers can enjoy a variety of meat specialties, soups, desserts, but also štruklji, which are recognized as the most famous Zagreb specialty made of rolled dough stuffed with a mixture of homemade cow’s cheese, cream and eggs.Zadar offers traditional Dalmatian cooked dishes based on fresh vegetables and seafood of the Adriatic Sea. The use of various Mediterranean spices such as rosemary, bay leaf, fennel, basil or sage contributes to the recognizability, and in the end everything is drizzled with homemade olive oil. Also, travelers must try the famous Pag sheep cheese and Posedarje prosciutto with homemade red wine. After a wonderful meal and sweet traditional cakes, you can enjoy Maraschino dessert liqueur in Zadar.Split is the gastronomic capital of Croatia known for its taverns. Split specialties are a real example of Dalmatian cuisine. Meat and fish dishes, homemade macaroni and various risottos with the fruits of the Adriatic Sea, Dalmatian prosciutto, salted sardines, anchovies and oil cheese, are inevitable in Split. In the capital of the Split-Dalmatia County, travelers must definitely try pasticada with gnocchi and Dalmatian crostula, which goes perfectly with the sweet dessert wine prosecco.last_img read more

The First Croatian Museum of Viticulture and Enology opens

first_imgAs part of the winery, the House of Wine Tradition was opened three years ago with valuable exhibits and a tasting room, while from the end of July visitors will have the opportunity to see a replica of an indigenous Dalmatian house decorated in the attic of the new museum.  In Putnikovići, at the traditional feast of St. Anne, a toast will be made to the opening of a new Pelješac attraction dedicated to vineyards, wine and Dalmatian lard. PZ Putniković is one of the largest and most successful wineries on Pelješac, which annually fills from 800 thousand to one million bottles of wine. They are dominated by those from Plavac mali, the variety that gives the best results on Pelješac.  The traditional festival on the occasion of the feast of St. Anne, July 26 in Putnikovići on Pelješac, gathers hundreds of lovers of top wines and Dalmatian atmosphere every year. But this year they have another reason to celebrate. Namely, on the feast of St. Ana, the “First Croatian Museum of Viticulture and Enology” is officially opened, which also includes the House of Wine Tradition. This small picturesque Peljesac place also hides one of the rarely preserved baroque churches in its original form, the church of Sv. Ana, which according to legend was built by winegrowers to protect their vine from misfortune. The wine “Sveta Ana”, PZ Putnikovića, which goes well with fish and Ston oysters, was named after this church.  “We are extremely proud to have completed this demanding project on two floors, with a total area of ​​800 square meters, where exhibits from our long viticultural and wine history are exhibited. The Feast of St. Anne is an excellent opportunity for this unique museum to be visited by locals and guests and to enjoy our wines, among which, in addition to the praised blues, is the maraschino named after our patron”, Says Jozo Rabušić, director of PZ Putniković, which gathers more than 140 winemakers from Putniković, Žuljana and Ponikava.  Photo: PZ Putnikovićlast_img read more

Resident doctors take on COVID-19 as training hangs in balance

first_imgTwo resident doctors from Airlangga University (Unair) in Indonesia’s COVID-19 epicenter – Surabaya, East Java – had been on track to wrap up years of studies in the next few months. However, following days of intensive treatment at their teaching hospital Dr. Soetomo Hospital, where they had been training and serving patients for years, they succumbed to COVID-19.Internal medicine chief resident Miftah Fawzy Sarengat died from the virus on June 10 after tending to COVID-19 patients in Surabaya, marking the first fatality reported among residents in Indonesia. Topics : “There is much worry among fellow residents. It is not only about fears of contracting the virus and potentially infecting families at home, but also about prolonging our education, whether we want it or not,” he said. “Adding one more semester means paying tuition fees for one more semester and more living costs for six more months.”Read also: COVID-19: How the second largest province became Indonesia’s epicenterSeventeen universities in Indonesia offer residency programs with an estimated 13,000 students, according to the Academy of Medicine of Indonesia (MKKI), the Indonesian Medical Association’s (IDI) council overseeing medical education.These residents are assigned to teaching hospitals, many of which are being used as COVID-19 referral hospitals. They work long hours with little to no pay, and when they do receive a salary it is way below the living wage.Indonesia’s university-based system for its residency programs meant that residents were considered university students who had to pay tuition fees, said MMKI chairman David Perdanakusuma.The fees range in the millions to the dozens of millions of rupiah, although there are scholarship options, with program duration lasting four to 12 semesters.This is in contrast to the hospital-based system applied in other countries, in which residents are considered workers who receive salaries throughout their training.”One of the ways to be able to survive being a resident is to be rich,” the Unair resident joked, adding more seriously that being a resident might not only lead to financial constraints, but also physical and mental issues.A 2011 research study that polled 117 University of Indonesia pediatric residents at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital in Jakarta found that 23.9 percent of students had experienced depression two weeks prior to their interviews. The study, published in Sari Pediatri, a journal from the Indonesian Pediatric Society’s (IDAI) publishing agency, also found that 59 percent of them had experienced depression more than once, with a majority of them relating it to their programs of study.As a result of the pandemic, some residents of pulmonology, internal medicine and anesthetics, among other fields, have been asked to directly tend to COVID-19 patients at ERs, wards and intensive care units under the supervision of specialist doctors.Hospitals and medical workers have had to limit services to non-COVID-19 patients, who have declined in number over virus fears, and reduce polyclinic activities and elective surgeries.This disrupted training among residents, as they were less exposed to cases that would help them meet the required competencies to complete their studies, David of the MKKI said. Less than a month later, on Sunday, pediatric resident Putri Wulan Sukmawati died from the virus, though Soetomo Hospital, also a COVID-19 referral hospital, insisted that she did not work in a COVID-19 isolation room and that the management was already “contact tracing internally”.center_img “At the hospital, there is no space that is safe from COVID-19. Even if we do not work in the COVID-19 [isolation] room, we can be infected by our colleagues,” an Unair resident who requested anonymity told The Jakarta Post on June 23.He said that, up until May, the teaching hospital had failed to provide enough personal protective equipment (PPE) for residents working in the emergency room, prompting them to rely on PPE donations. It was only in June, after reports caught the public’s attention, that the hospital allowed residents at the ER to ask for a new set of PPE for every four hours, he said. A resident at Brawijaya University in Malang, East Java, who wished to remain anonymous, said his teaching hospital of Saiful Anwar had seen a “boom” of COVID-19 patients, meaning there was a high possibility of prolonged training.”[Hospital] departments are now requesting for tuition fee relief […] We are certainly financially concerned because we rely on our own money and scholarships, and we cannot work [while taking residency],” he said on Sunday.Read also: Workers, volunteers involved in COVID-19 fight entitled to JKK benefits: Manpower ministerJoni Wahyuhadi, the president director of Soetomo Hospital and curative management head of East Java’s COVID-19 task force, told the Post on June 26 that the hospital made sure there was an adequate stock of PPE and that it was processing incentives for residents. He said it was restructuring its ER.At the time, he said nine residents were treated for COVID-19 at the hospital, with one admitted to the ICU. On Monday, Joni said one resident was treated for the disease at his hospital and three others at Unair’s infectious diseases hospital. Joni did not respond to questions on the total number of infections among residents.Unair has promised a 50 percent cut in tuition for residents providing care to COVID-19 patients. It has also waived their tuition while they take temporary leaves of absence from their study programs.Meanwhile, David said the government had now rolled out incentive policies for residents via teaching hospitals, which were expected to register residents with the Workers Social Security Agency (BPJS Ketenagakerjaan) to access the benefits.”There is a possibility for a hospital-based residency system. Consequently, there needs to be an adequate teaching staff and hospitals that meet the teaching requirements,” he said. “There also needs to be support [from policymakers] in the form of regulations and laws on the inception of hospital-based systems.”last_img read more

Construction has started on the iconic SkyNeedle Apartments

first_imgConstruction has started on the first stage of a $125 million dual tower community centred around the city’s iconic SkyNeedle.He said SkyNeedle Apartments were positioned at the heart of South Brisbane, with connectivity to the Brisbane CBD and Southbank.A cafe during stage two will be incorporated at the base of the SkyNeedle, becoming a standout feature enhanced by water features.An exclusive residents’ recreational space will include a resort-style pool, barbecue pavilions and seating areas. Mr Pradella said next year marked the 30-year milestone since SkyNeedle made its debut at Expo 88 and expected the first tower to be completed by late 2018. Developer Pradella has started construction on the first stage of a $125 million dual tower community centred around the city’s iconic SkyNeedle.Brisbane hairdresser Stefan Ackerie bought the structure in the 80s, later selling it to developer Pradella Group in 2015.More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020Pradella director Kim Pradella and Brisbane Lord Mayor Graham Quirk launched the start of construction on the ‘legacy landmark’, with more than 70 per cent of apartments in the first tower selling for a total of $38 million.Mr Pradella said the first tower included one and two-bedroom units, however a few buyers had opted to amalgamate apartments to create a larger property with a customised floorplan. He said the apartments were designed to be as iconic as their namesake and was Brisbane’s next step in its emergence as a ‘new world city’.“These residences will really be next level in terms of their accessibility and amenity,” Mr Pradella said.“The SkyNeedle makes this community immediately identifiable not only for locals but also visitors. “It is the wow factor that sets this development apart from all others across the city.” Kim Pradella and Lord Mayor Graham Quirk at the SkyNeedle construction site.A BRISBANE icon known for once lighting up the city skyline will get a facelift as part of a new development that has just kicked off.Incorporating the refurbished SkyNeedle as part of South Brisbane’s $125 million dual tower SkyNeedle Aparment project, the first tower will comprise 110 of the total 237 apartments.SkyNeedle, an 88 metre pillar, was a key feature of Brisbane’s World Expo in 1988, and remains a prominent marker on the city skyline.last_img read more

Syracuse basketball opponent preview: Visual breakdown of North Carolina State

first_imgCat Barber’s 23.5 points per game leads the ACC. He’s on pace to become the second player in ACC history to average 23 points, 4.5 rebounds and 4.5 assists per game.N.C. State grabs 37.2 percent of available offensive rebounds, which ranks 17th in the country. Syracuse is last in the conference and 338th nationally in defensive rebounding percentage. Comments Team ComparisonSyracuse vs. N.C. State Create bar charts Positional ComparisonAdvertisementThis is placeholder textMichael Gbinije – Cat BarberCreate bar charts Published on February 27, 2016 at 9:30 am Contact Jon: [email protected] | @jmettus Facebook Twitter Google+ Dajuan Coleman – BeeJay AnyaCreate bar chartsBig Numbers Trevor Cooney – Maverick Rowan Create bar charts Tyler Roberson – Abdul-Malik Abu Create bar charts Related Stories Beat writers predict mixed outcomes for Syracuse basketball’s matchup with North Carolina StateSyracuse basketball opponent preview: What to know about N.C. State Malachi Richardson – Cody MartinCreate bar charts Overviewlast_img read more

Figo proposes 48-team World Cup

first_imgFormer Portugal winger Luis Figo launched his campaign for the FIFA presidency on Thursday by revealing plans to expand the World Cup to up to 48 teams.Unveiling his manifesto at Wembley Stadium in London, the 42-year-old said the expansion of the quadrennial tournament from its current 32-team format would be “weighted towards non-European teams”.One of his proposals for the World Cup is to split it into two 24-team tournaments played simultaneously on two different continents, followed by a final knockout stage in one country.Another of his key proposals is the distribution of half of FIFA’s wealth – $2.5-billion (2.19-billion euros) – directly to its member associations for spending on grassroots football.The former Barcelona and Real Madrid superstar also called for the restoration of the ‘old’ interpretation of the offside rule, “where a player is judged offside whether directly involved in the play or not”.Figo is standing against incumbent Sepp Blatter, Dutch football chief Michael van Praag and FIFA vice-president for Asia Prince Ali bin Al Hussein in the FIFA presidential election on May 29.last_img read more